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Work Samples

DUOX4Odells: You'll Know If You Belong

DUOX4Odell’s You’ll Know If You Belong, an ode to the legacy of Odell’s, the legendary nightclub that still stands today as an aberration of its former self, no longer in use and still maintaining its peculiar façade on North Avenue. Through an installation spanning multiple projections, personal testimonies, and free-standing sculpture, Wickerham & Lomax investigate the rich history of the club’s years of occupancy from 1976–1992, an attempt at preserving and illuminating its cultural memory in the Station North Arts & Entertainment District and contemporary Baltimore club culture.

Local Atonement - A Nutshell Study of Unexplained Death (Installation view)

2016, American Medium gallery, New York. Within a series of large-scale digital paintings are objects that function in dialogue with the televisual—set design, set dressing, and props—while simultaneously challenging traditions of object presentation: the still life, shadow box, and vanitas. The hierarchy of these objects is not based on their utility, but in their ability to assist in manufacturing narrative. It is similar to the contemporary phenomenon of posturing for social media and yearning for the indicator of an experience more than the actual experience itself.

Take Karaoke - A Proposition for Performance Art

2015-2016 , Single channel HD video, Cohen Gallery, Brown University Providence, RI Take Karaoke is the first in a three-part project entitled “The Baltimore Trilogy.” The exhibition uses the materiality of bars, performance spaces, and nightlife venues to stage, engage, and rewire tropes of performance art. Organized around forms of social exchange in a Baltimore gay bar called The Drinkery, Take Karaoke is a voluptuous bionic striptease; a riot of frivolous adaptation; a performative jump-off; a platform (literally!) for activism, pick-up lines, and stand-up comedy.

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DUOX4Odells: You'll Know If You Belong

DUOX4Odells: You'll Know If You Belong, an ode to the legacy of Odell's, the legendary nightclub that still stands today as an aberration of its former self, no longer in use and still maintaining its peculiar facade on North Avenue. Through an installation spanning multiple projections, personal testimonies, and sculpture, Wickerham & Lomax investigate the rich history of the club's years of occupancy from 1976-1992, an attempt at preserving and illuminating its cultural memory in the Station North Arts & Entertainment District and contemporary Baltimore club culture. Recorded history is fused with the artist's imagination that brings the past into the present where its hardens into a meditation on loss.

Local Atonement - A Nutshell Study of Unexplained Death

American Medium is proud to presentLocal Atonement: A Nutshell Study of Unexplained Death, Wickerham & Lomax’s first solo show in New York in four years. The exhibition will trace some of the key themes in their 2012 Artists Space show DUOX4Larkin, which concerned the workspace as an articulation of one’s identity and the compulsion to personalize.

“Glessner Lee’s dioramas convey her sense that houses can be false shelters, places carefully furnished to conceal ongoing crimes, lies, suffering, and fury.”

Within a series of large-scale digital paintings are objects that function in dialogue with the televisual—set design, set dressing, and props—while simultaneously challenging traditions of object presentation: the still life, shadow box, and vanitas. The hierarchy of these objects is not based on their utility, but in their ability to assist in manufacturing narrative. It is similar to the contemporary phenomenon of posturing for social media and yearning for the indicator of an experience more than the actual experience itself.

Wickerham & Lomax's ongoing web-based narrative BOY’Dega: Edited4Syndication (since 2014) presents their character Kimbra, whose parents own an antique store. Characters in the BOY’Dega universe are shells (files) for storing various contemporary phenomenon and articulating them through peripheral means. The antiques suggested in these works seem to inherit a contagion, forcing on them some of the bodily aspects of those who have owned them: an old basketball wears a corset, a head continues life in a Ziploc bag, and a severed arm continues drafting a letter of discontent.

“These rooms evoke the incomparable silence of houses whose objects have suddenly and unexpectedly outlived the inhabitants who arranged them.”

The idea of location as character and the insidious aspects of its effects on its occupants lead to notions of escape, the discarded, and identity confusion, all colliding to punish the artists with their own set of iconography. The use of this recurring iconography is a way of running towards obsolescence and rendering these items into antiques. The matters of concealment and distraction are both taken up as forms to depict in a dizzying, yet legible, presentation.

[Quotes from Patricia Storace’s The Shock of the Little]

Uncool

Uncool

April 2–30, 2016 / Terrault Contemporary / Baltimore, MD

10 things you didn’t know about the Wickerham & Lomax show:

  1. Boosting ideas from tired artworks is an erotic gesture.
  2. Pumping through life on someone else’s frequent flyer miles is supreme luxury.
  3. Killing trends by being late to them, maximizing lateness to a point of infinity.
  4. A fucked up kind of bricolage solidified into an elegant turd.
  5. Being quiet, yet screaming telepathically.
  6. Supplementals have a way of burrowing to the center.
  7. I wanna steal your shit. I wanna take your vision.
  8. Presenting glass in which you can’t be reflected, but still shattered.
  9. Wardrobe stolen from geeks online.
  10. Should we thank Joanne? Never give credit.

The ten statements above can be applied to any of the ten digital paintings in the show as functioning titles. The paintings are at once about the props which are stylistically culled from the look of W&L’s Boy’dega: EditedforSyndication and then the item chosen is presented in various types of display. In Boy’dega’s narrative, it’s suggested that one of the characters, Kimbra, works in an antique store owned by her parents. This works as a prompt not completely coinciding with the mandates of the world building’s continuity, but as an offshoot to extend further world building possibility. The manner to which the props are presented, becomes a way to further inform the fiction of these items, to provide them with a logic structure that could lead towards reality (believability). The process of generating these paintings works like a kind of assemblage, certain aspects during the CGI process are cut from other models and recombined to create a new set of conditions/context for the CGI model.

The core ideas of the exhibition are: provisionality, display, artifact, speculation, and style. In their practice Wickerham & Lomax have made the forms that are peripheral elements to a television show be the core of their works — elements that fortify the aspects of commitment to truth in a fiction. These often include: character profiles, wardrobe, set/location, trailers, and now props. This way of working acts as a metaphor of giving anything of marginality an added value not to be diminished by the thing of centrality. The works themselves have a symbiotic relationship feeding of the other’s waste and generating a kind of value for themselves.

Thrift, steal, destroy, ponder, messy… apologize.

  • Uncool (Installation shot)

    Dye sublimation print on canvas, rock-sprayed wooden frames, mesh bags, nylon webbing, metal rings. 60 x 96 inches ea.
  • Uncool (Detail)

    Uncool (Detail) Dye sublimation print on canvas, rock-sprayed wooden frames, mesh bags, nylon webbing, metal rings 60 x 96 inches
  • Uncool (Installation shot)

    Uncool (Installation shot) Dye sublimation print on canvas, rock-sprayed wooden frames, mesh bags, nylon webbing, metal rings 60 x 96 inches ea.
  • Uncool (Installation shot)

    Uncool (Installation shot) Dye sublimation print on canvas, rock-sprayed wooden frames, mesh bags, nylon webbing, metal rings 60 x 96 inches ea.
  • Uncool (Installation shot)

    Uncool (Installation shot) Dye sublimation print on canvas, rock-sprayed wooden frames, mesh bags, nylon webbing, metal rings. 60 x 96 inches ea.
  • Uncool (Installation shot)

    Uncool (Installation shot)
  • Butt Purse Male and Female

    Butt Purse Male and Female Dye sublimation print on canvas, rock-sprayed wooden frames, mesh bags, nylon webbing, metal rings. 48 x 72 inches ea.
  • Pillow Purse

    Pillow Purse Stuffed dye sublimation print on canvas, mesh, chain webbing, zinc rings, charms 24 x 72 inches
  • Pillow Purse (Detail)

    Pillow Purse (Detail) Stuffed dye sublimation print on canvas, mesh, chain webbing, zinc rings, charms 24 x 72 inches
  • Pillow Purse Two

    Pillow Purse Two Stuffed dye sublimation print on canvas, mesh, chain webbing, zinc rings, charms 24 x 60 inches

Take Karaoke - A Proposition for Performance Art

Wickerham & Lomax invite you to perform yourself and karaoke if you please at the opening of their new video installation. The first in a three-part project entitled "The Baltimore Trilogy," the exhibition uses the materiality of bars, performance spaces, and nightlife venues to stage, engage, and rewire tropes of performance art. Organized around forms of social exchange in a Baltimore gay bar called The Drinkery, "Take Karaoke" is a voluptuous bionic striptease; a riot of frivolous adaptation; a performative jump-off; a platform (literally!) for activism, pick-up lines, and stand-up comedy.

SYNOPSIS
Various elements of nightlife take on a new utility in the feature-length work by allowing moments of excess to become performance gestures. Digital modification treats the body as a springboard for experimentation between chthonic elements and bionic appendages to layer visual glamour on performative spectacle. In capitalizing on troupes of performance, such as stand-up comedy, karaoke singing, striptease, pick up lines and drinking games, stylized violence and onstage presence become distorted. Codification occurs through a commitment to the form that is in tension with the artists’ interpretive relationship to what performance actually may be. The whole work functions as an experiment of compositing real life frivolity with imagined digital obstructions/adaptations.

  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art

    Take Karaoke 2015 Runtime:45.3 minutes (Installation view) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.
  • Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 11.42.20 AM.png

    Take Karaoke - A Proposition for Performance Art (Still)
  • Take Karaoke 03.png

    Take Karaoke - A Proposition for Performance Art (Still)
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art

    Take Karaoke 2015 Runtime:45.3 minutes (Installation view) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art (Installation view)

    Take Karaoke 2015 Runtime:45.3 minutes (Installation view) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art

    Take Karaoke 2015 Runtime:45.3 minutes (Installation view) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art

    Take Karaoke 2015 Runtime:45.03 minutes (Installation view) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art (In

    Take Karaoke 2015 Runtime:45.3 minutes (Installation view) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art (still)

    N.Security & Coat Check 2015 Runtime 4.35 minutes & 12.4 minutes (Installation View) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art (still)

    Icons 2015 Runtime 2.45 minutes (Installation view) Brown University, Cohen Gallery Two platforms sit in the center of the room which are utilized for audience participation in response to the scripts/prompts from the video. The audio is fed through wireless headphones and the performer's voice is used as a surrogate for the artist own.

Janet & Walter Sondheim Prize Finalist Exhibition

In Boy'dega the ensemble cast is an oscillating extension of its lead actor and becomes a metaphor for community and family. In the televisual web series its made explicit due to the ability to inhabit his body. He is a vessel and his friends become technologies extending his person. The lines of character, fan, author and actor gain fluidity to talk about the aims of successful collaboration. Girth Proof is an investigative stance on a subculture that talks about notions of access and exclusivity based on one's body-image. It explores things about ways one becomes disassociated from the group or find various points across its spectrum while still using narrative and the language of television as an investigative tool. We have deliberately chosen frats as the follow up social group to explore because the conversation has a dual implication in this work as both a homo erotic gesture, and a conversation around sexual violence whether through rape or hazing.
We wanted to design a project that could allow all these groups represented through forms to function in the same space as well as work towards the ways they imbue and complicate each other's narratives down the line.

  • Installation View

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 6 printed towels, 2 6'x9' vinyls, 6 wigheads covered in a bird seed mixture and bar snacks covered in resin, 5 ceramic works dispersed through the installation 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Detail Image

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 6 printed towels, 2 6'x9' vinyls, 5 ceramic works dispersed through the installation, 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Detail Image

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 6 printed towels 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Installation View

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 6 printed towels, 2 6'x9' vinyls, 6 wigheads covered in a bird seed mixture and bar snacks covered in resin, 5 ceramic works dispersed through the installation, Three channel video work with interactive web component 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Detail Image

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 6 printed towels, 2 6'x9' vinyls, 6 wigheads covered in a bird seed mixture and bar snacks covered in resin, 5 ceramic works dispersed through the installation 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Detail Image

    6 wigheads covered in a bird seed mixture and bar snacks covered in resin, 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Detail Image

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 6 printed towels, 5 ceramic works dispersed through the installation, Three channel video work with interactive web component 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Detail Image

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 2 6'x9' vinyls 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Installation View

    8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets, 6 printed towels, 2 6'x9' vinyls, 6 wigheads covered in a bird seed mixture and bar snacks covered in resin, 5 ceramic works dispersed through the installation 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Frat Paddle 1-8

    (Detail) 8' black stained wood paddle customized (in mesh, straps, 6' metal chains, and rock spray) du-rags with grommets 2015, Baltimore Museum of Art

Video Works

Wickerham & Lomax

  • WHALES SPF 50

    The evolutionary track becomes a place from which stereotypes, swimming, and intimacy ricochet off experience about surface, sound, and theme to bemoan the end of a relationship. Whales SPF 50 is the first in a series of commissioned video works for BmoreArt and will be featured on the poetry EP XXIV Humans early next year. In the series, anthropological concerns are moved from cold, object, and observation driven models to ones of emotional and spiritual connection.
  • Self with Self, 2016

    Self with Self is a dyptic video work where parenting is considered by non-parents as an enduring performance.
  • Take Karaoke: A Proposition for Performance Art (2015)

    Digital modification treats the body as a springboard for experimentation between chthonic elements and bionic appendages to layer visual glamour on performative spectacle. In capitalizing on troupes of performance, such as stand-up comedy, karaoke singing, striptease, pick up lines and drinking games, stylized violence and onstage presence become distorted. Codification occurs through a commitment to the form that is in tension with the artists’ interpretive relationship to what performance actually may be.
  • Encore in the AftaLyfe (2014)

    Runtime 31:02 minutes HD video. Season 2, Encore in the AftaLyfe is an interpretation of the director’s cut and takes the content of the first season's web based multi video presentation and condenses it by turning it into a single-channel video. Having undergone drastic editing the creators become forensic specialists, and the voiceover in this video eulogizes the end of Season 1 where our cast has all died. Throughout AftaLyfe the artists take on the role of the actor and the observer of the action.
  • BOND SALON (2014)

    Runtime 5:50 minutes HD video. BOND SALON complicates Bond's concerns for concealing information, security through obscurity, and wearing a narrative to help her avoid further assimilation into the show’s ensemble cast. Bond is played by Betty Fashionopulous. This salon, where nearly every surface is mirrored, is a disorienting place to work. Modeled after a CIA office, a traditional hair salon, and Vogue’s fashion closet, the salon—like the nosey neighbor on the block—uses its surfaces to absorb rumors and gossip.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication INTRO CREDITS

    Runtime 1:29 minutes HD video. This video takes its references from T.V. crime drama introductions credits, particularly that of HBO’s The Wire. This video introduces our cast through head shots and body bags.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication Trailer

    Runtime 1:11 minute HD video This is a trailer for the BOY'Dega website project which examines the merit in the actor's ability to embody his character, there too could be value in the author's ability to embody their fans. “We are both the fans and the parents of our progeny (prodigy).” Through levels of role confusion the artist seek to create a form of security through obscurity.
  • Male Purse (2015)

    Runtime 1:00 minute HD video.
  • Female Purse (2015)

    Runtime 1:00 minute HD video.

GIRTH PROOF

Girth Proof is the first physical "spin off" from the BOY'Dega website—specifically from the section titled Keys to the Khroma Klub. Girth Proof considers the territory of the club, where gay Bears have been placed, as a liminoid for potential customization. The detritus of disaster is reclaimed to form an antidote to the mundane. Bad behavior remaps the social codes of nightlife. These vinyl flyers list demands and promises the way all flyers demand and promise access and privilege.

The vinyls push the typical layered visuals seen in actual club flyers over the edge of good taste. The images are variously pierced with digital grommets threaded with diamond necklaces, scaffolded with gold-studded planks scarred with text, split and then re-bound with trompe-l’œil laces. The gay hosts are under decorative assault and repair, and the viewer is invited to deal directly with the superficial—to “get into it” or get out.

We have previously looked at collaboration through the lens of best friends, fashion designers and show runners as surrogates for ourselves. Most recently, we have identified as gay dads who "gave birth" to the character named Boy'd, the primary figure of the sprawling online narrative franchise BOY'Dega. Girth Proof belts this endless self-expansion and looks at what and who—is being squeezed out. It began with a casting call for gay Bears. This subculture is at the center of the exhibition in so much that it is the material spread around four club flyers.

  • GIRTH PROOF - Installation view

    Digitally printed vinyl, printed metal plates and single channel video. Girth Proof considers the territory of the club, where gay Bears have been placed, as a liminoid for potential customization.
  • Immaculate Conception Club Flyer - Detail view

    72" x 120" Digitally printed vinyl, acrylic rod, grommets. We have previously looked at collaboration through the lens of best friends, fashion designers and show runners as surrogates for ourselves. Most recently, we have identified as gay dads who "gave birth" to the character named Boy'd, the primary figure of the sprawling online narrative franchise BOY'Dega. We asked ourselves what an image would look like if it got dressed up to go out.
  • Set Design - The Cave

    Digitally printed vinyl 120" x 271" Across from these four flyers is hung the largest work in the exhibition, a 23? diagram: The Cave. Simply put, it is a digital club that rests idly on a flatbed truck. (A set piece from episodes 4-10 in transit to the backlot? A place designed perhaps for the BOY'Dega cast to enjoy?)
  • GIRTH PROOF - Detail view

    Outside The Cave, the night sky is filled with anecdotes, rumors, and gossip about the artists’ practice. "BOND SALON was the easiest work we ever made.” Our practice is based on the accelerated exchange of frivolous information, gossip, and codified language that crystallizes into accessible forms in hopes of giving dignity to that exchange.
  • Set Design - Flooded Bar

    120" x 271" Digitally printed vinyl, grommets.
  • ID Vitrine - Corner Booth

    96" x 96" Metal shelf, printed metal plates. The back room of the exhibition sits in contrast to the superficial front room. As ones moves deeper into the exhibition more is learnt about the host's real names and interest via dating site type questionaries. hobbies, favorite foods, eye color etc. There's no time to determine whether this is the coveted VIP booth or a green room, a memorial or a rehearsal; the bar is flooding nearby.
  • BOY’Dega Season 4 Video

    Runtime 2:20 minutes HD video This video is a simulation of a walk through of the real exhibition if wind could blow the gallery roof off to animate the works on the wall. The video is meant to create a myth of the exhibitions physicality and to complicate the show's reputation from being easily described. This video starts Season 4 of BOY'Dega, where weather plays the role of a sculptor, creating, destroying and distributing images.
  • 01-12.jpg

    GIRTH PROOF Vol. II (Installation shot) Double Sided Odalisque, Jarell (foreground) Digital printed vinyl, mesh cover, on metal stand 108" x 84". Ice Purse, Lawrence (Background) 54" x 66" Inkjet on canvas. Girth Proof Vol. II pivots on the exhaustion of being visible, active, and participatory. On view are four large-scale, double-sided male odalisque images positioned to expand and collapse the gallery’s physical space by allowing the images in proximity to absorb one another through digital reflections.
  • 20-5.jpg

    GIRTH PROOF Vol. II (Installation shot) Frozen in ice or stuck behind glass, a series of paintings, elevated window decals, framed club paraphernalia, and a video proposing a collection of rotating ass purses add to the density of an installation intended to simulate the excitement of brushing past a crush at the club.
  • 37-2.jpg

    GIRTH PROOF Vol. II (Installation shot) Two single channel videos Male Butt Purse, runtime 1:00 minute and Female Butt Purse, runtime 1:00 minute. Digital printed window decal feature the BOY’Dega cast member’s heads in ice.

BOY'Dega Edited4Syndication

A visionless prototype (BOY’D) throws a desktop through a storefront window. The resulting storyboard vinyl suggests a merger/marriage/mirage. This is a previsualization for the collaborative's invented miniseries, BOYD'ega. [BOY’D?] is a protagonist developed in the early decades of the new millennium to star in a miniseries as a notion to challenge teenagers to push their bodies in regards to fitness, technology, lifespan, self-esteem, and multi-tasking. The miniseries premiered on June 2, 2018.

BOY'Dega Edited4Syndication is a project disseminated digitally through a website containing video and media rich content that looks at television as an expanding form.

If there is merit in the actor's ability to embody his character, there too could be value in the author's ability to embody their fans.

Television’s evolving penchant for storytelling has given way to its own peripheral distribution platforms such as: Hulu, Netflix, official show sites, and fan sites that inform a show’s episodic universe. These central narratives can also manage to be at odds with their syndicated selves leading towards: moralizing reedits, binge viewing, appropriation, shared commentary and further convolutedness. Through these a new story evolves that implicates the collective makers, participants, and addicts as formidable foes to the show’s creators.

“We are both the fans and the parents of our progeny (prodigy).”

Boy’dega: Edited 4 Syndication is a website that uses a model to extrapolate scenarios and visuals from systems that seek to either qualify or quantify the body in the urban sphere, and through levels of role confusion create a form of security through obscurity. The site is a supplemental to the show’s non-existence, a consciously chosen mirage based on aspects of HBO’s The Wire. The model posits the nature of interchangeability through a set of key roles in any show’s canon: the character, the author, the fan, and the actor working towards a dissolving of their stability. HBO’s The Wire presented a metropolis where bureaucratic institutions and the people they quantify are steeped in codes, hierarchies, and modes of conduct while simultaneously policing each other. The show’s creator David Simon uses the phase “juking the stats” referring to institutions that setup systems and test only to benefit from their results directly. This phrase/action implying moral ambiguity sets a working model for his series. The nature of this ambiguity lead us to our model and a set of 5 central terms as modes of operation.

  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication Walk Through.

    Runtime 1:31 minutes HD video. This video shows what a viewer would see first when visiting http://duoxduox.com/ the Boy’dega website. They are introduced to an ensemble cast and asked to pick a navigation weapon before moving through a digital body and exploring video content.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication (Website still)

    After DUOX4Larkin we craved to release a viral project into the water supply, with all the fluidity that image might entail. This still from BOY'Dega Season 1, is a 3D rotating head which is one of sixteen different webpages of a digital cadaver that splits the body up into parts for navigating the website. The user will find prop videos and text about the making of BOY'Dega the deeper they navigate into the body. BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication is a 10-part series. Here we draw on the conceptions and conceits of cross-platform, transmedia storytelling.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication (Website Still)

    This is a still from BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication Season 1. This image is an early page on the BOY'Dega website where the user is given choices among various cursors to use, all of which are interpretations of weapons made in prison. Choice and navigation are the main ideas in BOY'Dega Season 1. B:E4S presents itself as fan-fiction parlaying as an artwork, both intended to inform one another by taking a Trojan Horse and trapping it in a Droste effect.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication (Website Still)

    This is a still from BOY'Dega, it is a detail from within the cadaver's body. The cadaver is one way of navigating season one where slipping sideways, confounding expectations and dissolving and refocusing are foregrounded as realities of this sprawling website. Distantiation, the supplemental, cultural practices, process/procedural, and self preservation cause further proliferation, engender new forms to present ideas of propagation, of reproduction, of mutation, of generation, and of moving from a place of origin to a "Frankensteinian" notion of selfhood.
  • BOY'Dega: BOND SALON (Video still)

    This still is from Season 3 of the BOY'Dega web series. BOND SALON takes place in a fictional Baltimore salon owned by BOND, played by Betty Fashionopulous, one of the main eight characters of the BOY"Dega series. This salon space in the video serves multiple functions and is modeled after a CIA office, a traditional hair salon and Vogue’s fashion closet. The salon becomes the place where news, gossip and rumors are collected and can be transformed in new possibilities to develop the characters and the story itself.
  • BOY'Dega: BOND SALON (Video still)

    This still is from Season 3 of the BOY'Dega web series. On screen the artists build elaborate foil headgear, first introduced into our work in the DUOX4Larkin Break Room 2012. They are worn to either keep information from entering or exiting. In this season the hats are the hope;? the inexpensive cost and ease of construction combat paranoia and conspiracy theories. Bond has a secret to unveil in Season 3, but receiving her message is the hard part. The voice of Genesis (Season 1 character) is heard throughout the video.
  • BOY'Dega: Encore in the Afta Lyfe (Video still)

    This still is from Season 2 of the BOY'Dega web series. Spring 2014 Afta Lyfe is a reinterpretation of the initial Boy'dega website into a single channel video that highlights the artist relationship to the characters who are in turn characters themselves. It takes an Urban drama set in Baltimore Maryland and fractures it through varied forms and mechanisms of representation. Here we present a structure that foreshadows the artist death as well which occurs at the end of the video.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndication (Website still)

    This still from BOY'Dega Season 1 This website uses the same model to extrapolate scenarios and visuals from systems that seek to either qualify or quantify the body in the urban sphere and through levels of role confusion, create a form of security through obscurity. The website is a supplemental to the show’s non-existence, a consciously chosen mirage based on aspects of HBO’s The Wire.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndcation (Website Still)

    This a still from BOY'Dega's Fanatic Section Audiences are left wondering: is this a game, a crime scene, or something else altogether? The website takes the character BOY'D from our last exhibition and builds a non-existing television show around him. Utilizing only supplementals of a TV show, we use other characters' lives to flesh out who BOY'D is, even as he himself remains a shell.
  • BOY'Dega: Edited4Syndcation (Website Still)

    This a still from BOY'Dega's Fanatic Section This page is found in the website's Fanatics section, where we as artist play the role of the TV show's fans and create video and images on their behalf. Dora the Explorer is a common character we have shifted and remodeled throughout many of our projects. Here we dress like her and taunt the viewer to add narrative information and help the story of BOY'Dega grow.

DUOX4Larkin

DUOX function's like a fast fashion brand (H&M) overlaying themselves and their methods onto Larkin Soap, a defunct company from the 19th Century. Adopting some old ideas and stretching others to an extreme, new productions emerge. Male Pregnancy, XL Look Books and The Gift Bags for all.

DUOX4Larkin draws on the historical example of the Larkin Company, a now defunct soap and home decorations company founded in the 19th Century. Housed in an administrative building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, Larkin achieved notoriety for its endeavors to promote harmonious working conditions and “pure” values amongst its workforce, in synthesis with the purveyance of lifestyle solutions to its customers. Considering Larkin as a prescient Gesamstkunstwerk of branded product and corporate values, DUOX4Larkin incorporates arrangements of objects and images that relate to the changed notion of labor - overly designed and dysfunctional workstations, detoured workwear, customized commodities, and the use of screens for both display and concealment. The physical qualities of DUOX’s work in which related elements indicate hierarchies of “the simulated” and “the real”, build on the application of physiological ideals of cleanliness and hygiene within contemporary culture. Underlying processes of customization suggest both the standardizing of aesthetic choice, and its extension into the realm of biopolitics. The composite inhabitant of their workspaces is part health worker, part surrogate parent, part fashion victim.

  • Installation view

    Digital prints on silk, laminated digital prints, vitrines filled with various objects DUOX4Larkin is a solo exhibition consisting of three sculptures (from right to left: Cribs, XL Look Book and Break Room) that consider life from birth to death and (the) work in between. Focusing on the screen's ability to hold information, the work's surfaces are laminated, concealed, and preserved.
  • XL Lookbook (Detail)

    Double sided digital prints on silk. These photographs sprang from the true story of a female construction worker who dyed her bangs to match her safety vest. We were interested in ways people use customization to cope with even the most banal and precarious aspects of their lives.The show was initially called Customize Your Strife. We created a wardrobe by making alterations at the dry cleaners, adding zippers, creating slits, hems and patching up holes. These codified alterations operated like DNA that could easily be passed on to an adopted by a new designer/collaborator in the future.
  • XL Lookbook (Reverse)

    Double sided digital prints on silk. A backside detail of XL Look Book prints are the most directly related to the show's title which is meant to invoke a fast fashion brand's collaboration with a high­end designer (ex: Alexander Wang for H&M) Our interest was to create these images to function like a design studio that wants to establish and spread the company's vocabulary and planting a seed in a broader audience
  • Cribs

    Laminated digital prints, metal pipes, stainless steel buckets, cereal, metal rings. The first sculptures are the Cribs, which exist in various stages of erection. They are flexible cradles where new form is meant to take shape. This show is the birth of a character named BOY'D. Here his baby face is rendered from thousands of dots contained in each Rasterbated page. Our collaboration was looking at the creative possibility of male co­pregnancy and what could be conceived together under this unlikely circumstance.
  • Cribs (Detail)

    The narrative around BOY'D was to create a protagonist out of parts, including Cervantes’s Don Quixote, Chaucer’s Wife of Bath, Gae?tan Dugas as the so­called Patient Zero, James Bond, and the ensemble cast of Oliver Stone’s Any Given Sunday. In this show, the press release is a letter of resignation appointing BOY'D to take over this environment.
  • LilyPad Table

    Cut glass, water cooler, DVD case, metal stand. The third sculpture is a constellation of cases, vitrines, and signage referred to as the Break Room. This part of the exhibition considers the break room as a site that, though removed from mainstream production, is no less vital.
  • Break Room (Detail)

    Vitrines and screens. Here artifices of the show's nine­month production are in casual communication: conch shells painted like sports equipment, two Dora the Explorer towels zipped together, a baby monitor filming a group of off­site Lava lamps, a net stuck with ID badges rests under glass, a coffee mug that announces World's Best Dad holds a set of pencils monogrammed with the exhibition's title, and a vitrine filled with see­through vials containing with a terrycloth landing pad, a sanitizing pen, an uncommitted ID badge, and a change of clothes.
  • Break Room (Detail)

    Again we used Craigslist, this time announcing an m4m missed connection. The entire room—the entire exhibition—is collapsed into a single image by a convex mirror mounted in one upper corner of the gallery, a vantage point for the less adventurous visitor.
  • Break Room (Detail)

    Vitrines and screens.
  • PROMO WebFlyer

    Promotional website done as a supplemental item for the DUOX4Larkin project.

Break My Body, Hold My Bones

Curator Nathan Lee commissioned DUOX to respond to Derek Jarman's 'Blue' and reflect on the becoming-viral of the digital ?ueer.

  • Installation view from Break My Body, Hold My Bones

    Installation view of B.M.B.H.M.B. CCS Bard Hessel Museum. Two single ­channel projected videos, translucent printed scrim on plastic, ceramic liquor bag, two chains encased in fabric sleeves, black vinyl.
  • Installation view

    We reflected on the becoming ­viral and the changing landscape of certain subcultures. We were asked to consider how queerness inhabits the landscape of online avatars, social networking, viral video, and multiple forms of digital being.
  • Parallel Play (B.Y.O.B. and Surrogates)

    Two single channel videos projected as one work entitled Parallel Play. Surrogates (Right) harnesses the labor of BFF's and buddy comedies by depicting best friends hanging out over the course of a day. These different pairs become stand-ins for our collaboration. B.Y.O.B. (Left) uses the scenario of a first date's vetting process to create portraits of men answer basic questions about themselves. Each were cast in the bathroom of our local gay bar.
  • Trailers for Surrogate and B.Y.O.B.

    In the foreground are two 16­foot chains that form a lazy double helix. Each is encased in a different fabric as a way to dress up or recode its situation. Two small TV screens sit on the floor, each playing the trailer to the larger videos project behind them. Collapsing the main feature film and its trailer in one space was our goal—to highlight the supplemental as the main event.
  • URHERE Scrim (Detail)

    Reference scrim printed on translucent plastic collapse's all the shows references to establish a loose map of how the show could be viewed.
  • Perfuming a Space

    A shirtless man who was casted from Craigslist and altered with a green arm. He was instructed to infect the galleries by spraying cologne as he walked. The performer functions as an app, going through the space detecting fake designer bags. Once the bags are detected he passes out a flyer scented with Givenchy's iPod-shaped fragrance "Play." All the while his appraisal is still unbeknownst to the subject of his judgement. The perfume was an attempt to create a memory of the show for the viewer.
  • Craigslist Ad for B.M.B.H.M.B.

    A casting method we thought Derek Jarman would have approved of.
  • Counterfeit Bag, 2 readymade plastics, and Ceramic Liquor Bag

    Cast offs left over from the performance
  • 2 chains

    Each chain wears its own dress code. Installation view of B.M.B.H.M.B. CCS Bard Hessel Museum
  • Altered Vinyl

    Installation view of B.M.B.H.M.B. CCS Bard Hessel Museum

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