Block title

Work Samples

Heart Beating Beneath the Earth VII

Archival inkjet print, 35" x 26" At the heart of this photograph is an icosahedron (or 20-sided polyhedron); the symbol for water in Plato’s cosmology of the universe. This element is situated in a landscape and is clad in detritus such as tires and plastics that commonly pollute and threaten our water.

Argo Documentation

Similar to the challenges Jason faced in order to accomplish his mission, the themes of the video projected on the outside of the structure of Argo: the power and beauty of water, industrial pollution, storm water runoff and agricultural water use.

The Ocean - Installation View I

The Ocean installation
installation documentation of "The Ocean", part of the juried exhibition it can begin with the clouds, curated by john ros.

Nudibranchs, Berghia coerulescen

Nudibranch Umbrella
Umbrella frame and mount, digital inkjet print on banner nylon 52” diameter, 39” depth

Share:

About Jann

Baltimore City

Jann Rosen-Queralt is an artist based in Baltimore, Maryland. Her artworks reveal the poetic nature of water while exploring social and ecological relationships and connecting them to universal themes. An avid scuba diver, underwater photographer and researcher of aquatic environments, Rosen-Queralt’s work integrates structures borrowed from marine creatures and scientific understanding to trigger public action and awareness. Notable works include: The Ocean, an installation consisting... more

Heart Beating Beneath the Earth

These in-progress sculptures are a futher exploration into the idea of platonic solids, which are building blocks of the universe in Plato's cosmology. In this framework, an icosahedron (or a polyhderon with 20 sides), is the symbol for water. That shape forms the foundation of each of these pieces, which are clad in detritus such as such as tires and plastic scraps, things which commonly pollute and threaten the viability and suvivability of our waterways.

Luminosity

I took these photographs to document threatened and ecologically sensitive marine environments around the world. I wanted to shine light upon the subjects of the deep to share their wonder. When scuba diving with my camera, I am faced with choices between ambient light or strobes, both of which have considerable limitations. Compensation must be made for lighting and focus. This collection of photographs is comprised of instances and moments of special illumination I have I frozen in time.

Digital Photographs printed on Archival Inkjet Paper, sizes range from 18" x 12" to 38" x 32".

The Ocean

The Ocean, 2019
multimedia installation, part of the exhibition "it can begin with the clouds", curated by john ros.
Pinkard Gallery, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore MD.

These artworks re-acquaint people with the importance of and our dependence upon water, a constantly evolving environment. A multi-faceted approach promotes understanding of the inter-related threads inherent in an ecosystem, which drives and shapes humans just as humans control and effect nature.

Together, the objects in this installation are parts of a network, stirring a memory. Similar to the way that a votive is a devotional gift designed to honor and adorn shrines, the polyhedrons and the photographs are dedications. I chose to work with polyhedrons, specifically the Platonic solids, after learning of Plato’s “theory of everything,”* a cosmology based on the dynamic elements’ primary roles in the transformation of the material cosmos –the environment.

Each polyhedron is symbolized by one symmetrical shape composed of triangles. The cube denotes solids of the Earth while the tetrahedron is associated with Fire’s purifying quality. The octahedron references the cosmic breath of Air and the icosahedron denotes Water, the life affirming liquid. This framework is a means to unlock a new perspective focused on elements - and our reliance on them - in the platonic cosmos.

*Plato's "account of the universe" is no longer satisfactory from the modern point of view, it has made a lasting impression on Western science and creative thinking.

Dystopian Collection

​Dystopian Collection 1 and 2, 2018
Archival Inkjet Prints, edition of 4

​An ongoing project, Dystopian Collection is a body of my underwater photographs which explore the frailty of aquatic ecosystems. This is evident in coral bleaching caused by rising water temperatures and acidification as well as declining fish populations due to over fishing. The focus is on the sublime beauty contrasted with the immensity of the deep awe-inspiring landscape.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In Memoriam 1 and 2, 2018 Archival Inkjet Prints paired with nickel-plated hazelnut limbs

Photographs of living marine landscapes are paired with contorted hazelnut limbs to evoke the mystery in death and what remains.

  • in Memoriam #2

    underwater photograph, monuments, memory, underwater photography, fine art photography, ecology
    In Memoriam #2 (part of Dystopian Collection), 2018 photograph: 12.5”x8.5”, edition of 4, sculpture: 8"x3.5"x2.5" archival inkjet print mounted on alumnium, nickel-plated hazelnut wood, painted aluminum shelf
  • In Memoriam #2 (sculpture detail)

    aquatic, monuments, memory, sculpture, fine art photography, ecology
    detail of hazelnut limb
  • Dystopian Collection #2, 2018

    underwater photograph, sea turtle, underwater photography, fine art photography, ecology
    12.5"x8.5" archival inkjet print. An ongoing project, Dystopian Collection is a body of my underwater photographs which explore the frailty of aquatic ecosystems – including low fish populations, dying coral and climate change.
  • Dystopian Collection #1, 2018

    underwater photograph, sea turtle, underwater photography, fine art photography, ecology
    12.5"x8.5" archival inkjet print. An ongoing project, Dystopian Collection is a body of my underwater photographs which explore the frailty of aquatic ecosystems – including low fish populations, dying coral and climate change.
  • In Memoriam #1, 2018

    underwater photograph, monuments, memory, underwater photography, fine art photography, ecology
    12.5”x8.5” archival inkjet print mounted on alumnium, 4"x5"x4"nickel-plated hazelnut wood, painted aluminum shelf
  • In Memoriam #1 (sculpture detail)

    aquatic, monuments, memory, sculpture, fine art photography, ecology
    Detail of the 4"x5"x4" nickel-plated hazelnut wood Limb
  • Held High Above The Vanishing Surface

    Jann Rosen-Queralt In Memoriam
    Held High Above The Vanishing Surface, part of the In Memoriam Collection, 2019 31”x22” Photograph mounted on dibond, 4”x4.5”3” Copper gilded hazelnut limb on aluminum shelf.
  • (detail) Held High Above the Surface

    Jann Rosen-Queralt Copper Limb
    part of In Memoriam - Held High Above The Vanishing Surface, 2019 4”x4.5”3” Copper gilded hazelnut limb on aluminum shelf

Arterial Waters

These projects in Arterial Waters add to a catalog of artwork that advocates for the marine ecosystem through focusing on its inhabitants and clean water.

Gentle Giants, 2017 (series in progress)
Underwater digital photographs, 10"x17"

Manta rays are one inhabitant, which has captured my imagination. They are pelagic gentle giants, who gracefully swim in strong current, mesmerizing anyone who has the privilege to experience the magnificence of their cartilaginous skeleton flex. Similar to an albatross, their mammoth wingspan gives them superb lift, as they effortlessly swim and somersault through the water. They are endangered due to hunting and climate change that has impacted water temperature and acidification along with phytoplankton and zooplankton populationsthey feed on along migration routes.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

​Rays in Reflection, 2018
Article in Full Bleed: A Journal of Art and Design, Issue 2 - The Crisis Issue.
Text: Jennifer Wallace and Jann Rosen-Queralt
​Photographs: Jann Rosen-Queralt ​My work and research focused on Manta Rays was included in the Crisis Issue of Full Bleed. ​Published by Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), Baltimore, MD.

  • Gentle Giants

    Manta Ray
    A Manta Ray photographed in the waters of the Socorro Islands.
  • Gentle Giants II

    Manta Ray
    A Manta Ray photographed in the waters of Socorro Islands.
  • Gentle Giants III

    A Manta Ray photographed in the Soccorro Islands
  • Rays In Reflection

    full bleed journal of art and design, Maryland Institute College of Art, Sustainable, Underwater, Photography
    Rays In Reflection, Page 2 of Full Bleed, A Journal of Art and Design Published in Issue 2, The Crisis Issue by the Maryland Institute College of Art also online at fullbleed.org Text by Jennifer Wallace and Jann Rosen-Queralt Photographs by Jann Rosen-Queralt
  • Reverance

    A Manta Ray photographed in the waters of the Socorro Islands.
  • Spotted Eagle Ray

    Spotted Eagle Ray, Galapagos Islands
    A Spotted Eagle Ray photographed in the waters of the Galapagos.
  • Spotted Eagle Ray II

    Spotted Eagle Ray, Galapagos Islands
    A Spotted Eagle Ray in the waters of the Galapagos Islands
  • Spotted Eagle Ray III

    Spotted Eagle Ray, Galapagos Islands
    A Spotted Eagle Ray in the waters of Galapagos Islands

Unsung Heroes

Unsung Heroes, Silber Gallery. Goucher College, 2016

(7) Umbrellas - Inkjet print on banner nylon, water, umbrella frames, handmade mounts, 52” Diameter, 39” Depth
(7) Dodecahedrons - laser-cut acrylic pieces from digital photograph, hand-constructed rhombic dodecahedrons, 5"x5"x5"

Work from "Intricate Observations x2", an exhibition featuring pieces from the ongoing series Unsung Heroes, which centers invertebrates and their role as indicator species in water quality assessment.

Underwater photographs from my diving trips are digitally composited and then stitched into umbrellas or fashioned into dodecahedrons (a polyhedron with 12 faces). The works are installed all about the gallery, encouraging an immersive experience of looking as gallery attendees move about the space, becoming part of the grouping of pieces which are hung from the ceiling, sprout from the ground, and protrude from the wall.

Unsung Heroes creates a context for humans to think of themselves as an umbrella species because we, as stewards of the earth, might be considered the most important one, with the potential to protect or neglect indicator species like those featured, through our implementation of policy and steering conservation and its effectiveness. All this underscores that through protecting umbrella species, we can indirectly protect the other orders that make up an ecological habitat.

Source

Source, 2012
an installation combining sculpture, digital sound, photography and public programming

Source is composed of seven elliptical columns that range in height from 6.5' to 9'. They are covered in wax and indigo dyed West African textiles. Each column contains a sensor which triggers a sound component, from a trio of sound compositions called "Water Sonettos" as visitors walk among them. The sounds were recorded during my visit to the Dogon villages of Andjoubolo, Pouroly, Soroly, and Sibi Sibi in Mali, and capture conversations with women in the YAGTU shallot co-operative. Photographs of the women, along with transcripts of the recorded conversations are displayed near the columns. Contributing to an already extant relationship between US Lutherans and the Dogon community, this project was sponsored by the Lutheran World Relief Organization as an outcropping of more general relief-work that addresses shared mission statements of broadening awareness of issues connected to water, women's empowerment and poverty reduction. A main tenant of the partnership was to reinforce ties between the two communities through telling the story of women's stewardship of water in Mali by way of art, performance, and public programming.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Shallots, 2012
chrome, onion bulbs, wood chips

A pair of two chrome plated onion bulbs placed on a thin layer of wood chips. Traditional sand molds were used to cast them in iron. The automotive chrome-plated polish references their value within the Dogon community. Through the sale of shallots, education, medicine, and other food can be acquired.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Water Footprint, 2012
Cast iron, steel, vinyl, water. 54" x 38" x 5"

This piece brings awareness about potable water depletion. A steel plate, cast-iron shallots and an inflatable vinyl oval filled with water, reference the volume of water used to produce shallots, a valuable foodstuff in the Dogon villages. Condensation and evaporation take place within the inflated form, giving Water Footprint a life of its own.

  • Water Footprint

    Water Footprint
    This sculpture references water consumption required to sustain a staple crop. It is a response to a trip to Mali where I met with the women of the YAGTU co-op. Access to irrigation allows them to grow shallots that return profit to pay for their families’ educational and medical needs. Water Footprint brings awareness about potable water depletion. A steel plate, cast-iron shallots and an inflatable vinyl oval filled with water, reference the volume of water used to produce shallots, a valuable foodstuff in the Dogon villages.
  • Water Footprint (Detail)

    detail of water footprint
    Detail photograph of Water Footprint
  • Water Footprint (Installation View)

    Water Footprint (Installation View)
    A woman takes a closer look at the cast shallots and details of Water Footprint, as installed for SOURCE.
  • Shallots

    Shallots
    Shallots is a pair of two chrome plated onion bulbs placed on a thin layer of wood chips. Traditional sand molds were used to cast them in iron. The automotive chrome-plated polish references their value within the Dogon community. Through the sale of shallots, education, medicine, and other food can be acquired.
  • Water Sonettos, (Excerpt) Sound Composite

    1 minute 5 second excerpt from Water Sonettos, the sound piece created for Source. The sound piece features Mali women speaking, singing, sounds of water, and other sound captured by Jann during her time in Mali.
  • Source (Installation View)

    Woman listening to the embedded sound in SOURCE
    A woman leans in to listen to one of the columns that makes up part of the installation SOURCE - which includes seven elliptical columns covered in wax resisted and indigo dyed West African textiles that are arranged about the gallery. Each column has an embedded sensor which, when triggered, plays a sound piece from Water Sonettos, the trio of sound works recorded from my conversations with women in the Dogon villages I visited in Mali.
  • Water Sonettos (Installation view)

    Water Sonettos
    Young girls lean in to one of the columns from SOURCE, in order to hear a sound piece from the collection Water Sonettos.
  • Source (Installation Printout)

    SOURCE printout
    Informational printout to provide further cultural context for the installation of SOURCE and the sound pieces Water Sonettos
  • Public Programming

    Public Programming and Events
    SOURCE brought together local artists, activists and community members to explore our relationship to water systems and water ecology. Creating a unique platform for awareness and examination through the combination of art, NGOs and educational programming, the exhibit tackled regional and global perspectives on water’s role in the matrix of life. The exhibition also featured information and public programs to connect artists and viewers to local and international NGO’s and scientific researchers who confront water quality issues and poverty reduction in their work.
  • Open house activity - casting soap shallots

    documentation of open house programming
    Open house programming - Project Coordinator Ryan Patterson helping youth Sam Bowers make soap using the shallot molds from "Water Footprint" at the Source exhibition.

Selected Site Specific Installations - Intermezzo Suite, Argo and Stream

Intermezzo Suite, 2013.
Cast soap oyster shells, steel mesh, duratrans, and video.
Dimensions variable.

With water as the unifying thread, Intermezzo Suite, a triptych of quiet interventions at The Kreeger Museum in Washington D.C. respond to Lloyd and Carmen’s travels and art collecting patterns as well as Philip Johnson’s architecture, in particular his desire to bring the outdoors inside and attention given to materials and framing views.
Objects such as hand-cast soap bars shaped like oysters, a duratrans piece that takes advantage of a grand window, and an embedded video raise the ideas of sanitation, purification, and ritual in context of a common domestic setting.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Argo, 2017
Wood, LED lights, video projection
Overall Dimensions: 55’ X 22’ X 11’

Commissioned by Light City Baltimore through the Baltimore Office of Promotion and Arts for the Light City Festival in 2017, this collaborative project with artists Marian Ochoa and Kirsten Walsh was supported by the Maryland Science Center.. The immersive sculpture and video installation is inspired by the Greek myth, Jason and the Argonauts Quest for the Golden Fleece. The sculpture references the Argonauts’ ship, Argos, and the narrative for the video approximates the hero’s journey.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stream, 2014

1:51 minute excerpt, full length 8:29 minutes. Video, projection and recorded audio. Projected onto the walls of the Maryland Science Center as part of the HOTWALLS series curated by Luminous Intervention, a Baltimore based new media activist group, Stream is a video piece that explores the inter-connectedness of water environments and inhabitants. Using the roller coaster as a metaphor for the closed system of the hydrologic cycle one is reminded to consider our daily dependence and access to water, the imagery connects urban and aquatic life creating an awareness of and respect for our finite water resources.
  • Part II: Sustenance

    Sustenance
    Part of Intermezzo Suite Part II: Sustenance. A semi-transparent photograph hangs illuminated from the interior garden window behind. In between two sculptures and at a slightly competing scale, the shark presented is filtering water as it feeds on plankton. Much like the filtering of water, here the flora of the man-made tropical rainforest lends a natural frame and background to the work, evoking the shark’s habitat and standing out from the more static tones and poses of the nearby sculptures.
  • Part II: Sustenance

    Sustenance
    Part of Intermezzo Suite Detail from Part II: Sustenance
  • Video Excerpt - Part III: Procession

    Part of Intermezzo Suite Located in the library, this piece blends footage of water-related systems inherent in Johnson’s design with light and color found in works from the collection into an abstract composition of its own.
  • Part III: Procession

    Procession
    Part of Intermezzo Suite. Located in the library, this piece blends footage of water-related systems inherent in Johnson’s design with light and color found in works from the collection into an abstract composition of its own. Appealing to both mind and heart, these installations about caregiving and regeneration pierce the confines of everyday reality and encourage us to rethink their place in the world around them.
  • Part I: Cleansing

    left: A detail image of soap oyster shells and written informational placard about the chesapeake bay.  Right: a pulled back image of the context, a bathroom.
    Part of Intermezzo Suite Left: Detail of soap oyster shells, Right: Context Part I: Cleansing (Intermezzo Suite) Cast soap oyster shells, steel mesh 10” D, signage 11 x 8.5” hand-made soap bars cast from oysters are arranged in the public bathrooms to raise the idea of sanitation, cleansing and ritual in the context of a common domestic setting. A companion label explains the filter-feeding mollusks source in the Chesapeake Bay and their vital relationship to water detergency.
  • Argo Exterior and Interior

    Argo exterior and interior
    Top: exterior of Argo. Bottom: interior of Argo. While the video on the outside of the piece focuses on catalysts for change to the regions' water systems, Argo's interior is illuminated by programmed LED lights which compound the immersive experience of the work.
  • Argo Documentation

    Similar to the challenges Jason faced in order to accomplish his mission, the themes of the video projected on the outside of the structure of Argo: the power and beauty of water, industrial pollution, storm water runoff and agricultural water use.
  • Excerpt from Argo video projections

    This video was projected on both sides of the sculptural element of Argo. The sequences replicate the structure of the myth of Jason and the Argonauts through through utilizing chapters that concern various elements of water health, quality and access. Fracking and climate change are addressed in this 2 minute excerpt.
  • Argo Public Performances and Workshops

    Argo performance evening
    The piece featured additional programming including interactive performances by Valeska Populoh (bottom right, performing as Riparia), an evening of performances by poets (top left, Anna K Crooks) and musicians (top right, Marca Cassity and Joseph Stands With Many) and workshops focusing on light's characteristics (bottom left) in partnership with the Maryland Science Center, in front of which it was sited.
  • Stream

    Projected onto the walls of the Maryland Science Center as part of the HOTWALLS series curated by Luminous Intervention, a Baltimore based new media activist group, this video narrative explores the inter-connectedness of water environments and inhabitants. Using the roller coaster as a metaphor for the closed system of the hydrologic cycle one is reminded to consider our daily dependence and access to water, the imagery connects urban and aquatic life creating an awareness of and respect for our finite water resources.

Selected Public Art Projects - Percolare, Awi-Spek, Resonance and Confluence.

A selection of public art projects.

Percolare, 2017
City of Raleigh Arts Commission. Sandy Forks Road Widening Project, Raleigh, NC.
Materials: Copper, Stainless Steel, Polished River Pebbles
Dimensions: Footprint: 130” X 78”
Element A (Tall Cone) 141” X 14” X 32”
Element B (Center Column) 224” X 24” X 30”
Element C (Short Cone) 52” X 15” X 26”

Sited beside a bio-retention pond, Percolare is designed as a response to the environmental rehabilitation integrated into this (LEED rated) Greenroads project, highlighting the passage of rain and storm water easily visible to pedestrians and automotive traffic. Composed of shapes and surfaces reminiscent of strainers and sieves, the piece mimics the distillation process occurring in the bio-retention basin. Inspired by the natural filtration process occurring in the basin, the three elements of the sculpture collect filter and release water during wet weather. During dry periods without water flow, the shapes and surfaces may remind one of distillation vessels, strainers, and sieves. Elements of the sculpture are both permeable and solid providing the means to collect and release water into the surrounding region.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Awi-Spek​, 2006
Commissioned by the Arts and Science Council - Charlotte Mecklenberg, Inc., Billingsley Medical Facility, Charlotte Mecklenberg, NC.
Concrete, permeable pavement, powder-coated aluminum, plant materials, and Trex.
Plaza dimensions: 20' x 30'. Sound Trumpet dimensions: A: 115”H x 25”D x 40”L, B: 83”H x 33”D x 46”L.

Awi-Spek sits on the north side of a bridge which connects the two sections of the Billingsley Medical campus. This refuge provides a physical place to observe the cycles of life and reaffirm patient activities while preserving and highlighting the ecosystem of indigenous plants and wildlife. The sounds of the environment can be listened to through the “ear trumpet” sculptures installed around the perimeter of the plaza area. Each trumpet is mounted on a pedestal directed upward toward the tree canopy to amplify sounds emanating from birds, rustling leaves, or creaking branches. The plaza is a tranquil place to sit and eat lunch, read or wait for an appointment. It also serves as a destination for patients to connect with nature, allowing caretakers the opportunity to structure educational programming around the resources of the woodland environment, such as bird walks that highlight sightings in order to identify and count the number of songbird species, or joining the dawn chorus to witness their singing. Patients participated in a poetry and painting workshop where they created unique designs on stones to embed in the drain-stone patio.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Confluence, 2011
Concrete, pavers, plant materials, powder-coated steel, water.
Overall Dimensions: 225’ x 65’ x 10’

This artwork explores the inherent balance, continuity, and cycles required in the treatment of waste water. The permanent installation is sustainably designed in that it is powered by recycled electricity and air produced during the cleansing process. Confluence is integrated into the plaza north of the solids building at the Brightwater Waste Treatment Plant in Seattle, Washington. Using data derived from peak periods of water flow in the wastewater system process plant, a kinetic sculptural element called the "breathing lung" recycles water with a smooth, human motion. As the pipes make visible the scale of conveyance and water consumption, the breathing action and volume of water changes according to literal use of water over the course of a day, reinforcing the impact of human use and the ebb and flow of natural tide-pools. Beyond Confluence lies a willow garden. The volume of the willow plants represent less than one percent of the millions of gallons of water treated daily at the facility.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Resonance, 2003-2009
Exterior porcelain tile, concrete pavers, nozzles, water. 30’ Diameter
Street and Park Road NW, Columbia Heights, Washington D.C.
Commissioned by the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities.

Resonance, a large scale Streetscape Revitalization Project in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of Washington, D.C. focuses on the kaleidoscope as a symbol of the diversity of the surrounding community. The project further emphasizes that theme by utilizing textiles from different geographic locales such as Africa, Latin America, North America and South East Asia. These concentric circles reference the ripple pattern made when droplets fall from above and the center medallions reference the culture of residents of the neighborhood.
For this project, I worked with architects to develop an urban design framework plan and construct a civic plaza that accommodates community events. Our team defined qualities of the neighborhood and public places with commercial and residential support through public meetings, surveys, and consultation with our community steering committee. The work includes a plaza with terraced grassy steps, seating elements, and an interactive mosaic-tiled fountain. Additionally, I developed a series of training workshops to mentor neighborhood artists in mosaic design, and then oversaw the fabrication and installation of 17 medallions along the 14th street corridor. This process extended the project into the neighborhood and helped the community participate in a tangible way, fostering a sense of ownership and pride over the space.

  • Percolare and detail of Element A

    Full and Detail photos of Percolare
    This permanent sculpture is inspired by the natural filtration process occurring in the basin, the three elements of the sculpture (A, B and C in descending order of height), collect, filter and release water into the rain garden to its right during wet weather. Right: this detail photo shows the perforated steel globes that sit at the top of element A.
  • Awi-Spek

    Plaza overall
    Nestled at the end of a walk through the woodland area where natural sunlight is filtered through the tree canopy, the temperature drops a few degrees, birds sing and insects buzz. Awi-Spek sits on the north side of a bridge which connect the two sections of the Billingsley Medical campus. Sound trumpets (pictured at left) amplify the woodland sounds while benches speckled around the walkway provide a quiet place for relaxation and reflection. Top: plaza from the trail. Bottom: overall view
  • Awi-Spek - Documentation of sound through sound trumpets

    Field recording of what one might hear through the sound trumpets at Awi-Spek.
  • Awi-Spek - Sound Trumpets

    sound trumpet
    (right) A child puts the sound trumpet to use by putting the small speaker to his ear. Sounds in the woodland are amplified by the ear trumpet sculptures (left).
  • Resonance

    Commissioned by the D.C. Commission for the Arts and Humanities, and in collaboration with Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architecture firm, Resonance utilizes textiles from different geographic locales (Africa, Latin America, North America and South East Asia) and interlocking concentric rings as the crux of its concept. Diversity within the neighborhood is represented through the textile images, courtesy of the Textile Museum, Washington, DC.
  • Resonance - Community use of Columbia Heights Plaza

    community use
    A composite of images that show various uses for the plaza at Columbia Heights, which encompasses the project Resonance.
  • Resonance - Mosaic medallions and map

    Mosaic medallions and map
    (top) Mosaic medallions created by a community artist, conceived and developed through workshops lead by Jann (bottom) Map detailing the layout of Resonance, including the medallions designed by community artists along the 14th street corridor and fountain mosaics
  • Confluence

    dual views
    Two different views of Confluence, (left) facing toward the solids building and (right) facing toward the willow garden. This artwork explores the inherent balance, continuity, and cyclical nature of the treatment of wastewater. Incorporating sustainable design of systems necessary for it to function, Confluence was integrated into the plaza north of the solids building. The bowl-like “breathing lung” continually empties and replenishes according to data from the water flow in the wastewater system process plant.
  • Confluence - short video

    A short video by Mithun, narrated by Jann Rosen-Queralt, demonstrating the 'breathing lung' aspect of the sculpture and the flow of water as the element moves up and down.
  • Confluence Willow Garden and Plaque

    view of willow garden, view from the willow garden
    (top) view of the Willow Garden (bottom) plaque in the Willow Garden The volume of willow plants (behind the workers in the top photo) represents a percentage of the millions of gallons of water per day that are treated at the facility. The willow garden or “green volume” is a poetic reference to the flow of water.

Connect with Jann

Jann's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.