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Work Samples

A Demographic Case Study (35-44, woman, Baltimore)

Sculptural installation of 126 Instagram ads viewed over a one-week period

Users Gonna Use

"Users Gonna Use" is a Performative Screen Recording that critiques Google's data collection practices

Homestead

This video touches on the history of my great-great-great grandparents who claimed land under the Homestead and Timber Culture Acts. The landscape, now vast, indistinguishable farmland, reveals more absences than answers. Two 150-year-old trees at the site and a nearby pioneer cemetery where my maternal grandmother, her mother, and her mother's mother are all buried, are vague markers of this history. In returning to this land, my matrilineage is subsumed by Mother Nature.

Old Oak

Old Oak is part of an interdisciplinary project that situates my matrilineage alongside larger notions of landscape, home, and gender.

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About Amber Eve

Baltimore City

Amber Eve Anderson's picture
Amber Eve Anderson's work as a conceptual, multidisciplinary artist pairs lyrical narrative with larger notions of home, memory, and identity. She vacillates between physical and digital worlds, combining images and found objects through installation and video while using artist books to physically archive digital phenomenon. She is interested in the way one's surroundings, whether virtual, man made, or natural, come to shape one's behavior and identity. She draws attention to everyday... more

A Demographic Case Study (35-44, woman, Baltimore)

"A Demographic Case Study (35-44, woman, Baltimore)" is an archive of every ad that I viewed on Instagram over a one-week period. Composed of 126 images that almost exclusively depict household goods, the archive presents a self-portrait through the lens of targeted advertising. Objects ranging from rugs to sofas to earrings to soap portrayed amidst orderly, plant-filled, sun-dappled rooms, suggest affluence, aesthetic integrity, and a good night of sleep. The work calls attention to everyday technologies by upsetting the usual means of interaction while also functioning as a playful critique in order to explore how identity is reduced by consumerism. This work was exhibited in my solo exhibition "This is Who I Am Now" at H-Space in Washington, DC.

Ad Words

"Ad Words" is a companion text for my solo exhibtion "This is Who I Am Now" at H-Space in Washington, DC. The book features 11 AI-generated poems based on captions from "A Demographic Case Study," an archive of 126 ads I viewed on Instagram during a one-week period.

Users Gonna Use

"Users Gonna Use" was exhibited alongside "A Demographic Case Study" in my solo exhibition "This is Who I Am Now" at H Space in Washington, DC. The video is a performative screen recording in which I critique Google's data collection practices using a video tour of one of Google's own data storage facilities as a background throughout the recording.

Accumulations

"Accumulations" consists of one-of-a-kind objects and images displayed in white frames, including torn wrapping paper, yellow tissues, a map, and pine needles, among other things. The work was exhibited alongside the installation of Instagram ads in my solo exhibition and acts as an alternative self-portrait.

Homestead

Homestead is an interdisciplinary project that situates my matrilineage alongside larger notions of landscape, home, and gender. In 1873, ten miles south of my native Nebraska and an hour's drive from the geographic center of the United States, my great-great-great-grandparents claimed land under the Homestead and Timber Culture Acts. The landscape is now vast, indistinguishable farmland. History reveals more absences than answers. Two 150-year-old trees at the site and a enarby pioneer cemetery where my maternal granmother, her mother, and her mother's mother are all buried, are vague markers of this history. In my return to this land, my matrilineage is subsumed by Mother Nature. The work archives and memorializes what remains of this place­­­­—personally significatn and universally forgtten­­­­—while considering the ways certain histories are privileged over others.

  • Homestead

    This video touches on the history of my great-great-great grandparents who claimed land under the Homestead and Timber Culture Acts. The landscape, now vast, indistinguishable farmland, reveals more absences than answers. Two 150-year-old trees at the site and a nearby pioneer cemetery where my maternal grandmother, her mother, and her mother's mother are all buried, are vague markers of this history. In returning to this land, my matrilineage is subsumed by Mother Nature.
  • Certain Histories

    9" x 12" Digital Photograph of my great-great-great-grandmother standing in front of the now-dying cottonwood that marks the land homesteaded by my ancestors
  • Old Oak

    Installation using Digital Photograph on Fabric with adhesive backing, Found paint swatches, Pressed cottonwood buds, Rconstructed historical book, Pillowcase embroidered by my grandmother, Tree limb, House paint
  • Detail of Old Oak

    Digital Photograph, Pressed Cottonwood Buds
  • Farmingdale

    Installation of photographs, tracing paper, found objects, dirt, and vinyl
  • Farmingdale detail

    Framed photographs and found objects
  • Detail of Personal Archives

    Cicada found at the National Homestead Monument preserved in resin
  • Timescales

    Timescales, Two-channel Video Installation

DIRT

DIRT considers the way land is defined and occupied. Using a vintage RISK board game, I replaced the army pieces with various seeds and the deck of cards with an accordion book that incorporates visual elements of the natural world and the nostalgia of childhood. The board itself became a three-dimensional garden in the way of a pop-up book that uses images cut from used gardening books. Flowers, bushes, and trees are pieced together in shapes and colors that mimic the countries outlined on the board. Finally, the rule book is replaced with a meditation on the plants that define the experience of my childhood home. DIRT was purchased by the Decker Library at Maryland Institue College of Art.

  • DIRT

    Vintage copy of the board game RISK turned into a pop-up garden.
  • DIRT

    DIRT considers the ways that land is defined and occupied. This image shows the board game box with the army pieces replaced by various seeds significant to my childhood upbringing.
  • DIRT

    I replaced the deck of cards with an accordion book with related found objects and imagery.
  • DIRT

    Detail of the accordion book
  • DIRT

    Detail of the accordion book
  • DIRT

    In place of the rule book, I made a zine that is a meditation on the plants that defined my childhood home.
  • DIRT

    These pages reflect on the peony bushes that lined the fence in my parents' backyard and the black locust tree in the front yard.
  • DIRT

    Detail of the board game-turned pop-up garden.

Things I Don't Remember

Things I Don’t Remember considers the experience of a tourist and is a reflection on my first trip to Montreal in 2008. In returning to the city over a decade later, I couldn’t remember anything from having been before, so I went back to my own Facebook archive where I found four photographs I had taken there: the façade of an nondescript building, a pair of red doors with yellow awnings, a selfie with a stick of maple taffy in my mouth, and a caramel latte with whipped cream. Souvenir in French can refer to both a keepsake one might buy as a tourist as well as memory itself. With this in mind, I used the first photograph I posted from Montreal in 2008 and enlarged it to the size of 168 postcards. Of these, viewers see only six fragments of the image and are invited to take one from the stacks on display. If a memory is something we remember, what is something we don’t remember?

Apartment 404 Not Found

For Apartment 404 Not Found I moved my home into the gallery. I then documented the installation as a 360-degree virtual reality (VR) image before removing all of the furniture. A half-circle "orientation table" similar to what you might find at a hilltop vista, sits in the center of the space, the absent objects depicted on its surface. The dislocation of relocation is exemplified by the juxtaposition of physically standing in a vacant space while viewing that same space in virtual reality filled with the belongings of home. The furniture from the installation—packed atop a moving pallet, wrapped in plastic—became a sculptural object alongside the VR installation. My home remained empty for the duration of the exhibition.

Free to a Good Home

Through this collection of objects offered and acquired for ‘free to a good home’ on Craigslist, I construct an image of home based on the things within it. Everyday objects gain importance through personal histories and associations. At times poetic, at times mundane, the pages within document the ads and subsequent email exchanges, offering a glimpse into the online interactions of the anonymous. From a classic 1940s sofa to an underwater camera case, the ephemera of one home assumes life in another, each object connecting every home. Available for purchase at Printed Matter (New York, NY) and Amazon.com.

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Amber Eve's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.