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Work Samples

Pry

installation, land art, environmental art, sculpture
Steel, phragmites, single channel video 14’x14’x24’ Indoor & outdoor installation Pry investigates humanity’s interruption of nature. Climate change yields more invasive species, like the acres of phragmites hugging the Chester River banks. (Shown: indoor gallery half of the installation.) Exhibition open through March 4 at Kohl Gallery at Washington College. Thanks to Maryland State Arts Council, Kent Cultural Alliance, and Kohl Gallery for their generosity in grant support for this show.

Lament

sculpture, steel, mixed media
Lament: steel, oak/pine/maple sticks sourced from Maryland forests 14'x14'x8' Women around the world, from Bangladesh to Benin, carry bundles of sticks to support their community. Sticks are used for shelter, cooking, and tools. Lament, a public artwork, references women's ritualistic ties to the land and humanity's dependency on forests. With 2021's California wildfires witnesses coast to coast, a single branch becomes sacred symbolism in a time of massive deforestation.

Acreage: A Poetry Collection

sculpture,environmental art, mixed media
Acreage, a 32-poem collection based on field notes from my art practice, was published December 2021 by Baltimore's Akinoga Press. A second collection will be released next year. Writing is a critical aspect of my artistic process. From initial research to thematic exploration, the format allows visual experimentation through words. An audiobook version of Acreage was transformed into sound art made available on Sound Cloud and Band Camp.

Paralyzed

dance, performance art, land art, environmental art
Video still of land art performance containing steel sculpture at Maryland's Duckett Watershed (video 4:51). Choreography and dance by Stephanie Garon. Music: Paralyzed by NF. As part of three part series of ecological performances supported by a Puffin Foundation grant, this work personified the land and explored nature's vulnerability through dance. The body's movements framed the relationship between humanity and nature.

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About Stephanie

Baltimore City - Highlandtown A&E District

Stephanie Garon's picture
Stephanie Garon's environmental art uses sculpture, installation, land art, writings, and drawings to investigate humanity's interruption of nature.  Natural materials, sourced locally, juxtaposed against industrial steel capture paradoxes like formalism/fragility and permanence/impermanence.  This year, Stephanie is a Hamiltonian Fellow, a National Park Service AIR in the Everglades, and a Puffin Foundation Environmental Art grant recipient. Her exhibition at Washington College is... more

Sculpture

My sculpture brings raw, natural materials into the gallery space, reassesses their forms, and calls for an acute and urgent recognition of the calamity caused by human action upon the environment. The natural materials are collected by hand locally and all steel sculpture is fabricated by me to investigate themes of claim, women's labor and permanence.

  • Brae

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Brae: Steel, cypress tree. 10'x10'x8' (As shown at Brentwood Arts Exchange 2021)
  • Beholden

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Beholden: Steel, Maryland feather grass 24"x24"x6" (As shown at Honfleur Gallery 2021)
  • Impalpable

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Impalpable: steel, felled red oak, enamel 96"x72"x36" (As shown at Hemphill Gallery 2021)
  • Prey

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Prey: Steel, oak 8'x6'x4' (As shown at Culture House 2021)
  • Kilometer

    environmental art
    Kilometer: cement mixed from melted snow. ​(Shown: 2'x6'x2') Water is means to survival. Around the globe, women are responsible for sourcing water to sustain communities. As the climate changes and access to water decreases, this sculpture quantifies the interconnectedness between humanity and the environment. (As shown at Alchemy of Art 2021)
  • Clout

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Clout: Steel I-beams, Princess Tree leaves (9'x9'x6') (As shown at Alchemy of Art 2021)
  • Lien

    steel sculpture
    Lien: Steel, soil sample from Patuxent River portion controlled by dam, 8'x4'x1' (As shown at Honfleur Gallery 2021)
  • Axis

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Axis: Steel I-beams, Oak tree 8'x6'x4' (As shown at Creative Alliance 2021)
  • Catch

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Catch: Steel, milkweed (5'x9'x3")
  • Vantage

    Vantage: Steel, water, burdock leaves, disco ball motor 3'x3'x14' (As shown at Honfleur Gallery 2021)

Installation

My installations are site specific explorations that examine the tenuous, dynamic relationship between nature and humanity. Viewers physically navigate their path and their connections to nature in site specific installations that often incorporate sculpture, sound, and video. 

  • Pry

    installation, land art, environmental art, sculpture
    Pry, a site specific installation at Washington College, investigates humanity's interruption of nature. Climate change ields more invasive species, like the acres of phragmites bordering the Chester River. Indoor installation: steel, phragmites sourced from Chester River, single channel video, sound (24'x24'x14') Outdoor installation: steel (14'x14'x7')
  • Hover

    Hover: steel, prunus cerasus tree, cherries, projection 12'x13'x10' ​Sound by Clint Sleeper By presenting nontraditional materials, like a suspended cherry tree and its fallen cherries, within a gallery space, Hover captures the ideals of the Arte Povera movement. Surrounded by steel sculptures, the audience witnesses the decomposition of the natural elements juxtaposed against the industrial materials through the duration of the exhibit. Hover investigates themes of claim, women's labor, and permanence.
  • Breaking Ground

    installation, land art, environmental art
    Wait Loblolly pine needles, video projection (4:53 loop) Site specific installation Sound by Clint Sleeper ​2021 ​Breaking Ground, a site specific full room installation at Washington DC's Honfleur Gallery, explores humanity’s connection to nature and features 200 cubic feet of loblolly pine needles. Whether the viewer considers their connection to nature by navigating their movements through the gallery or reflects on the sculptures’ decomposition of natural materials, the contemplative space explores how we, as individuals, engage the natural world around us.
  • Bearing

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    “Bearing”: steel, single channel video 7:45, sound (8’x9’x8’), steel 8'x4'x4' Filmed at low tide in Maine (Cobscook Bay near Pleasant Point Reservation). An area on Google Maps that’s colored grey. Bearing investigates space & impermanence with undercurrents of land claim. Steel sculpture serves as a mapping of routes taken towards and away from a vanishing point.
  • Silent Spring

    Silent Spring, an immersive environmental installation at Motor House (12/1/20-2/1/21), explores humanity’s connection to the environment through a journey that is both an expedition and a contemplation. Rows of 1,000 prehistoric-sized Princess Tree leaves (Paulownia tomentosa) frame an ethereal leaf labyrinth. These leaves, classified as an invasive species of weeds, are typically found in soils hurt by construction or fire and frequently located in pavement cracks or by powerlines at the road’s edge. They grow 15 feet/year until smothering the canopy.
  • Lament II

    steel sculpture, nature art
    Lament II: steel, pine/oak/maple tree branches 8'x23'x4' Women around the world, from Bangladesh to Benin, carry bundles of sticks to support their community. Confined by land and ritualistic roles, Lament references women's work. ​Lament II was curated for Washington DC's Foggy Bottom Biennial and was exhibited from June 2021-September 2021. ​
  • Fathom

    installation, land art, environmental art, sculpture
    Fathom: sound art generated by Vermont's Mad River & Lincoln Brook’s force against 300 feet of steel & galvanized cable. Collaboration with Clint Sleeper. . Fathom, inspired by the unit of measurement of water depth, uses sound as the intersection of art & science. As we experience more storms from climate change, water agitates the steel to make sound.
  • Lament

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Lament: steel, oak/pine/maple sticks sourced from Maryland forests 14'x14'x8'. Women around the world, from Bangladesh to Benin, carry bundles of sticks to support their community. The sticks are used for shelter, cooking, and tool making. Confined by land and ritualistic roles, Lament references women's work and humanity's dependency on forests. With climate change and globally devastating wildfires, a single branch becomes sacred symbolism in a time of massive deforestation.
  • Framed

    Framed: steel, white ash tree 4'x8'x4' (As shown at Studio 80 Sculpture Park)
  • Tread

    sculpture, steel, mixed media, environmental art
    Steel, soil, glue 4'x6' Climate control, gravity, and time influence the artwork to decompose. Changes in the soil create a performance art as the movement of the soil puckers and landslides down the frame. As shown: day 4 at Creative Alliance's Organic Destruction exhibition.

Land Art

My land artworks explore humanity's interruption of the land through writing, installation works, performance art, and video. Over the past two years, a series of three land art works were created on a section of Maryland's Patuxent River managed by a dam, evidence that the earthworks will disappear when the dam reopens. The artworks were submerged like many of the Mid-Atlantic prehistoric petrogyphs that were destroyed for hydroelectric projects. The public's view from the bridge transformed the digging process into performance art. A written and spoken word piece accompanies the series. A 28-page book (long form poem) will be published in 2023 by Akinoga Press based on these works. 

Four environmental performance artworks,  supported by a grant from The Puffin Foundation, explored humanity's movement around nature. The performances focused on themes of indigenous lands, wildfires, and invasive species.  

Two new large scale land art projects also began in 2021: the Maine Mine Core Sample Project and Washington College's Solo Exhibition "Pry" with indoor and outdoor installations opening in January 2022. 

  • Land Art (Aerial view)

    Three large scale land artworks were created along the Patuxent River, Maryland, in an area that is controlled by a dam. This video contains the aerial footage for two artworks: Cusp (50') and Dig (500')
  • Dig

    Dig, an excerpt of a video documenting the creation of a 500' land art, is located at a section of the Patuxent River managed by a dam. When the dam reopens, the artwork gets submerged like many Mid-Atlantic prehistoric petroglyphs that were destroyed for hydroelectric projects. By exploring the interdependence between humanity and nature, this performance art and earthwork focus on impermanence.
  • Cusp

    land art, environmental art
    Cusp: shovel and hand carved portion of Patuxent River (Maryland) 50'. Cusp, the second in a land art series at a section of the Patuxent River that is managed by a dam, follows the shape of the shoreline and points towards the land's boundaries. By carving the land, like skin, the piece references loss and scarring by humanity. Over several months, the void filled with plastic bags, bottles, and receipts. When the dam reopens, the land art will be submerged. A spoken word piece accompanies the documentation of the earthwork.
  • Paralyzed

    dance, performance art, land art, environmental art
    Video still of land art performance containing steel sculpture at Maryland's Duckett Watershed (video 4:51). Choreography and dance by Stephanie Garon. Music: Paralyzed by NF. By personifying the land and exploring vulnerability through dance, the dancer's movements frame the relationship between humanity and nature. Although the watershed is a protected piece of government land, it is completely surrounded by new building developments that claimed centuries-old farmland.
  • Survive

    dance, performance art, land art, environmental art
    Video still of land art performance containing steel sculpture and textiles at Maryland's Duckett Watershed (video 3:46). Choreography and dance by Stephanie Garon. Music: Survive by Diablo. By personifying the land and exploring vulnerability through dance, the dancer's movements frame the relationship between humanity and nature. Performed in the woods simultaneously as 4 million acres of trees burned in California's 2020 and 2021 wildfires.
  • Silent Spring

    dance, performance art, land art, environmental art
    As part of the public programming of the Silent Spring environmental art installation, this performance involved navigating paths around invasive species. Music by Clint Sleeper.
  • Beginning, Becoming

    Clip of Beginning, Becoming public performance at Honfleur Gallery Beginning, Becoming: by Christopher Stracey (6:05) Movements are drawings in pine needles. After research, sketches, sourcing, writing and conversations, my personal work culminates with wordless expression. My practice is built upon sculpture, but steps through nature and land help me understand form, perspective and permanence.

Poetry

Writing is a critical aspect of my artistic process. From making lists to verse, written word serves as a companion to the themes of my sculptural work as I source local materials.  After publishing in numerous international literary journals, my poetry collection was published by Baltimore-based Akinoga Press this year and translated into an audiobook.  In 2020, I was honored to be a Writer-in-Residence with Baltimore's Yellow Arrow Publishing.  

  • Acreage: A Poetry Collection

    writing, text, environmental art, land art, poetry
    Acreage is a chapbook collection of 32 poems that speak to the vulnerability of nature to humanity. Over the past year, poems were published in eight international literary journals.
  • Acreage: The Audiobook

    book, published, nature writing, environmental art
    Sound art! Bentley Sound Studio mixed my voice, rain, oak seeds & more into professional tracks to record the audiobook version of Acreage.
  • Land Reckoning

    writing, text, spoken word, land art, poetry
    Land Reckoning is the written companion to a series of three land artworks completed along the Patuxent River, Maryland. The chapbook is distributed next to the video documentation of the land art at gallery exhibitions.
  • Reliquary

    Reliquary was published in the San Antonio Review.

    PDF icon Reliquary
  • Terra Cotta

    writing, text, spoken word, land art, poetry
    Terra Cotta was published in Resilience, a literary volume by Yellow Arrow Publishing.
  • Relentless Rain

    writing, text, environmental art, land art, poetry
    Relentless Rain is part of a collection of poems written as part of the process of sourcing materials for artworks. The collection will be published by Baltimore based Akinoga Press in 2021. The collection is also being made into an audiobook, incorporating sound art.

Drawings

  • Oneirism

    drawing
    Onerism Anthotype made from melted snow, maple leaves, and charcoal 4'x9'
  • Untitled 1

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Untitled I: steel, paper, charcoal, beet 30"x24"
  • Untitled 2

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Untitled II: steel, charcoal, beet 36"x24"
  • Untitled 3

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Untitled III: steel, paper, charcoal, beet 30"x40"
  • Catch

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Catch Steel, charcoal, beet 36"x48"x1"
  • Throw

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    Throw: Steel, charcoal, beet 42"x48"x1"
  • Behold

    watercolor, pigment
    Behold: black walnut, invasive bittersweet berries, 12"x18"
  • Coarse

    painting, watercolor
    Coarse: black walnut, charcoal 12"x18"
  • Fray

    drawing
    Fray Galvanized steel cord, charcoal, beet 42" x 10 feet
  • Undercurrent

    drawing
    Galvanized steel, charcoal, beet 3'x10'

Projects in Process

Since August 2021, I have worked with teams of scientists, indigenous tribes, and community members on the Maine Mining Core Sample Project. I was invited by Smithereen Farm in Pembroke, Maine to create large scale artworks using 20,000 rock core samples to support their Maine Clean Water campaign. Close to Canada, the entire town depends upon clean water for their economy, health, & environment. I’m working with scientists, researchers, community members & indigenous tribes through the year.
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A mining company is attempting to reopen the mine in the town, where these original samples came from. Mines obliterate the water supply & surrounding environment, so the project is geared toward environmental justice. After researching mines and geology speaking with scientists from the Urban Soils Institute, learning from meetings with Passamaquoddy tribe members and exploring land and community on site in Pembroke, I am building a model for exploratory artworks that advocate for environmental justice. 

The exhibition will have two parts: an outdoor, community based installation in the heart of Pembroke and a traveling gallery component.
Exhibitions include:
-Maryland Institute College of Art (June 2022) outdoor labyrinth
-Alchemy of Art Gallery (June 2022)
-Hamiltonian Gallery (DC) (December 2022)
-University of Southern Maine (January 2023)
 
Outdoor installation:
-Labyrinth at te main quad at MICA open to the community
-Labyrinth at the main Pembroke triangle open to the community
Northeastern Indigenous tribes consider labyrinths to be a means for humanity to connect to a source: when someone walks through, it's a gesture of gratitude to the earth. Since the rocks were taken from the land by the mining company, returning the rock to the soil would signify healing. At the center of town, this interactive installation would be at the heart of the community and pull people to the venues at the town center. 

  • Extracted Mining Cores

    sculpture, steel, mixed media
    More than 20,000 mining cores were extracted from the earth 90 years ago at Big Hill, the mining site in Pembroke/Sipiyak, Maine. Stored on site at Smithereen Farms, these contain gold, silver, lead, and sulfur. The exact mineral composition impacts how much the current larger mining company, based in Canada, can sell stock.
  • Extracted Mining Cores: Storage

    rock, steel, sculpture, extraction
    The 20,000 extracted mining cores are stored based on a system consistent with the U.S. Geological Service. By working with a multitude of scientists through the Urban Soil Institute, I have been able to better understand the political, financial, and aesthetic impact of the cores' compositions.
  • The Maine Core Sample Project

    The Maine Core Sample Project uses video, photography, and large scale sculpture to investigate the impact of one mine on the small town of Pembroke, Maine.  At the heart of the exhibit is a set of 20,000 rock core samples extracted from the land 90 years ago.
  • Labyrinth

    installation, land art, environmental art
    An outdoor installation in the main Pembroke triangle will focus on using the 20,000 core samples to construct a large scale labyrinth open to the community. Maine indiginous communities consider labyrinths to be a means for humanity to connect to a source: when someone walks through, it's a gesture of gratitude to the earth. Since the rocks were taken from the land by the mining company, returning the rock to the soil would signify healing.
  • Mapping Environmental Impact of the Mine

    maps, land art
    I worked with NASA scientists and scientists associated with the Urban Soils Institute to start to assess the land from satellite. These maps, using Landsat data, visualize the change in land over time and impact on the community's water sources.
  • Slag Candlesticks

    rock, environmental art, land art
    With slag left over from the Pembroke Iron Works left as a natural resource on the land, I am investigating using it as a material for artworks that can be revenue generating, produced locally by Pembroke citizens, and sold online. I've done exploratory metal forging work with a metal jewelry artist to compose form for the artworks to transform it into bracelets, earrings, and candlesticks as an additional revenue stream for the community.
  • Pry: Washington College

    land art, environmental art, gallery
    In preparation for indoor and outdoor exhibitions at Washington College in January 2022, I've collaborated with the scientists at the Washington College River and Field Campus to identify site specific environmental issues. At the Chestertown campus, there are three parcels of land that include 230 acres of land that was converted to agriculture then managed plots that could support environmental initiatives like reducing agricultural runoff, improving water quality, and bolstering quail populations.

Connect with Stephanie

website:

Stephanie's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.