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About Shana R.

Baltimore City

Shana R. Goetsch's picture
Shana R. Goetsch's art frequently involves themes of social justice, empowerment, love, loss and bereavement; she began painting in 1989 after witnessing the murder of her mother. Often using words, cultural references or found objects, she injects personal voice, history and memory into her pieces. Originally from southeastern Wisconsin, Goetsch's work has appeared in numerous exhibitions nationally, and is held in private collections. She received her MFA and MA in Community Arts from the... more

Community Arts, Domestic Violence Advocacy

programming and public art projects that accompany my domestic violence-informed exhibitions

  • Participatory Art with Worry Dolls

    (below, as posted during the exhibition) Please Choose a Worry Doll! Use the yarn provided to create an outfit! Give the Worry Doll to someone who might need it! _____________________________________________ Who hears their worries? Children under the age of ten from House Of Ruth Maryland, a domestic violence shelter in Baltimore, created contemporary Worry Dolls based on Guatemalan traditions. These dolls take on the burden of our worries when we are sleeping.
  • Participatory Art with Worry Dolls

    *This is an example worry doll created by youth at The House Of Ruth Maryland.
  • Participatory Art with Worry Dolls

    (below, as posted during the exhibition) Please Choose a Worry Doll! Use the yarn provided to create an outfit! Give the Worry Doll to someone who might need it! _____________________________________________ Who hears their worries? Children under the age of ten from House Of Ruth Maryland, a domestic violence shelter in Baltimore, created contemporary Worry Dolls based on Guatemalan traditions. These dolls take on the burden of our worries when we are sleeping.
  • Collograph printmaking workshop

    October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month (NDVAM). In honor of this, I offered a free collograph printmaking workshop at the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts. The workshop was developed to coincide with my exhibition, "3 Tributaries" (October 4- November 3, 2012) and engage the local community in Blue Mountain Lake, NY. This workshop was promoted by New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, as part of their "Shine the Light on DV" campaign. In return, we used purple ink in recognition of NDVAM and victims of domestic violence.
  • Collograph printmaking workshop

    October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month (NDVAM). In honor of this, I offered a free collograph printmaking workshop at the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts. The workshop was developed to coincide with my exhibition, "3 Tributaries" (October 4- November 3, 2012) and engage the local community in Blue Mountain Lake, NY. This workshop was promoted by New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, as part of their "Shine the Light on DV" campaign. In return, we used purple ink in recognition of NDVAM and victims of domestic violence.
  • Collograph printmaking workshop

    October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month (NDVAM). In honor of this, I offered a free collograph printmaking workshop at the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts. The workshop was developed to coincide with my exhibition, "3 Tributaries" (October 4- November 3, 2012) and engage the local community in Blue Mountain Lake, NY. This workshop was promoted by New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, as part of their "Shine the Light on DV" campaign. In return, we used purple ink in recognition of NDVAM and victims of domestic violence.
  • Community Art/Organizing

    This piece was conceived to be participatory in nature. Shown at the "House Show" (Urbanite @ Case[werks] gallery, in partnership with D-Center Baltimore), this piece was dependent upon community participation. It was started by me, with only the national domestic violence statistic showing. Patrons to the group exhibition were directed to a closet, where they were asked to create a row house out of cardboard and fabrics. The row houses were then painted by me (if they wanted) and attached to the board in the gallery space, to create a collective of individual pieces.
  • Community Art/Organizing

    This piece was conceived to be participatory in nature. Shown at the "House Show" (Urbanite @ Case[werks] gallery, in partnership with D-Center Baltimore), this piece was dependent upon community participation. It was started by me, with only the national domestic violence statistic showing. Patrons to the group exhibition were directed to a closet, where they were asked to create a row house out of cardboard and fabrics. The row houses were then painted by me (if they wanted) and attached to the board in the gallery space, to create a collective of individual pieces.
  • Community Art/Organizing

    This piece was conceived to be participatory in nature. Shown at the "House Show" (Urbanite @ Case[werks] gallery, in partnership with D-Center Baltimore), this piece was dependent upon community participation. It was started by me, with only the national domestic violence statistic showing. Patrons to the group exhibition were directed to a closet, where they were asked to create a row house out of cardboard and fabrics. The row houses were then painted by me (if they wanted) and attached to the board in the gallery space, to create a collective of individual pieces.
  • Community Art/Organizing

    This piece was conceived to be participatory in nature. Shown at the "House Show" (Urbanite @ Case[werks] gallery, in partnership with D-Center Baltimore), this piece was dependent upon community participation. It was started by me, with only the national domestic violence statistic showing. Patrons to the group exhibition were directed to a closet, where they were asked to create a row house out of cardboard and fabrics. The row houses were then painted by me (if they wanted) and attached to the board in the gallery space, to create a collective of individual pieces.

3 Tributaries

Domestic violence knows no boundaries and carries no discrimination. Row houses are the subject of this series, and part of my continued goal to fight domestic violence pictorially. Even though the row houses are seemingly silent and static buildings, they embody the “souls” of those affected by violence. They are a narrative that helps to explain the magnitude of domestic violence incidents nationally and within Baltimore City, Maryland.

The series, "3 Tributaries" has been exhibited at the Maryland Institute College of Art, The Riverwest Artists' Association in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and recently at the Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts in Blue Mountain Lake, NY.

  • Tributary 3 at Jubilee Arts

    When is a house no longer a home? According to national statistics, one in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. This overwhelming statistic is represented here in four large-scale collograph plates. The scale was chosen to correspond to the height of an average female or teenager. 4 large row house plates exhibited in conjunction with House Of Ruth Maryland shelter residents' art at Jubilee Arts in Baltimore.
  • Tributary 3 (detail)

    When is a house no longer a home? According to national statistics, one in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. This overwhelming statistic is represented here in four large-scale collograph plates. The scale was chosen to correspond to the height of an average female or teenager.
  • Tributary 3

    When is a house no longer a home? According to national statistics, one in four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. This overwhelming statistic is represented here in four large-scale collograph plates. The scale was chosen to correspond to the height of an average female or teenager.
  • Tributary 2 (detail)

    When is a house no longer a home? Over 4,000 domestic violence cases were heard in Baltimore City Circuit Courts in 2009. I see these row house prints as the souls of those affected; a violent and fear-filled house is no longer a home.
  • Tributary 2 (detail)

    When is a house no longer a home? Over 4,000 domestic violence cases were heard in Baltimore City Circuit Courts in 2009. I see these row house prints as the souls of those affected; a violent and fear-filled house is no longer a home.
  • Tributary 2 (detail)

    When is a house no longer a home? Over 4,000 domestic violence cases were heard in Baltimore City Circuit Courts in 2009. I see these row house prints as the souls of those affected; a violent and fear-filled house is no longer a home.
  • Tinbutary 2 (detail)

    When is a house no longer a home? Over 4,000 domestic violence cases were heard in Baltimore City Circuit Courts in 2009. I see these row house prints as the souls of those affected; a violent and fear-filled house is no longer a home.
  • Tributary 1 at 901 Arts

    53 Row Houses, collograph plates inked and wiped, exhibited with Better Waverly's 901 Arts youth artwork, Baltimore, Maryland. Display in conjunction with facilitated youth collograph printmaking workshops on the topic of "Safe Spaces" and an event in Better Waverly, "Community Conversation on Teen Dating Violence"
  • Tributary 1

    When is a house no longer a home? In 2009, fifty three people died as a result of domestic violence in Maryland. The fifty three inked collograph plates shown here represent these individuals. Used as a metaphor for the effects of domestic violence, the process of inking inherently covers up the brightness or “life” of the plate.
  • Tributary 1

    When is a house no longer a home? In 2009, fifty three people died as a result of domestic violence in Maryland. The fifty three inked collograph plates shown here represent these individuals. Used as a metaphor for the effects of domestic violence, the process of inking inherently covers up the brightness or “life” of the plate.

The Psychology of One

"The Psychology of One" is a series about reflections and perceptions, as well as action and reaction. Each piece ultimately creates a symbiotic contemplation between one half and the other. This multimedia series explores the psychological constructs and material aspects of transparencies, projections, reflections, symmetry and wholeness.

Blog/Artist Statement excerpt:

"...The reason why I chose this particular challenge was to tell a story.

I tell my story a lot through my art, it's used mainly for my own sanity, it's used by me for healing. I have had a lot of really bizarre things happen to me, namely my mother's murder by my brother and many of the events that surrounded it. There is a part of me that strongly knows that I would not be the person I am today, that I would not be who I am without these events. I also know, and knew at the time even, that they were far outside the realm of normal human experience.

One of the strange things, in a long litany, beyond just that solitary event, was that my maternal grandmother put our story on the 'news' program, 'A Current Affair' when I was 16. She did this to help pay for my brother's defense trial. It backfired in many ways. It was not sympathetic towards him, that's for sure...there was actually one quote by the very sensational reporter '...where did God or Nature blunder?' in reference to him. Where indeed...

...What this event was really about for me, was taking back control. For years I had had all of these images and sound bites and stories written about me and my family, my mother. And I was going to take them back. I stole them back from the media, I stole them back from my grandmother, I stole them back from the newspapers, I now take them back from the internet (because you can, indeed find some on here, if you know where to look).

So, in a strong sense, this is about my own self-autonomy, and the fight to have me and my mom on my own terms. Which is why I make art about her, it's always a tribute of sorts. And it's about all I can physically do to rectify and understand all of these things, for her and my sake. It's to cast her in a light that is more that just that of a victim. She was loved by many, but most importantly, she is loved by me. I am stealing her back, so that only I own the right to her memory and her image and her story from now on."

  • With My Own Blood

    screen capture of repurposed video, edited by Shana R. Goetsch and Ada Pinkston "I have never worked coldly...but rather, in a certain sense, with my own blood." - Kathe Kollwitz
  • With My Own Blood

    screen capture of repurposed video, edited by Shana R. Goetsch and Ada Pinkston "I have never worked coldly...but rather, in a certain sense, with my own blood." - Kathe Kollwitz
  • Darkening of the Light

    transparent digital prints on vinyl "Emotion is the chief source of all-becoming conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion." - Carl Jung
  • Darkening of the Light

    transparent digital prints on vinyl "Emotion is the chief source of all-becoming conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion." - Carl Jung
  • Darkening of the Light

    transparent digital prints on vinyl "Emotion is the chief source of all-becoming conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion." - Carl Jung
  • Darkening of the Light

    transparent digital prints on vinyl "Emotion is the chief source of all-becoming conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion." - Carl Jung
  • Darkening of the Light

    transparent digital prints on vinyl "Emotion is the chief source of all-becoming conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion." - Carl Jung
  • Darkening of the Light

    transparent digital prints on vinyl "Emotion is the chief source of all-becoming conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion." - Carl Jung

Continuum

"Continuum" is an ongoing collection of intuitive watercolor paintings, started in 2002. This gallery represents the newest works, only a small fraction in the body of paintings I've created with circular imagery.

For years, the circle has meant everything, and nothing to me, all at once. It is a paradoxical shape, at the very least, but it is the one shape that makes the most sense. Circles are synonymous with perfection, and flaws in those perfect facades can only add layers of meaning to their simple shape. The circle is a single tension that holds countless other tensions; it alludes to life, the human body, nature, and religion. It is the primary muse for the creation of my ongoing, abstract, watercolor series. Whether the circle ultimately represents a mania, or a calming agent within me, I have always returned to my center.

Wheels of Vimana

The series mines what is not working, what has not been used, things that are seemingly “useless”, yet have been saved for years. The work emulates a machine, underscoring the very human ability to put things back together in terms of a life, in terms of a workable fix, in terms of healing. The pieces are becoming cogs; useful, engaging parts of the whole. Created as a centering mechanism, the mandalas became something of a conceptual response to machinism.

Medium - collage: paints, papers on cardboard

Connect with Shana R.

Shana R.'s Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.