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Work Samples

Jenny's Departure (detail)

Woven image of a screenshot of "The Bachelor"
Part of a larger series addressing modern mythology through the lens of popular culture. This image depicts a woman rejected by the lead during the second episode of the season of "The Bachelor". I was struck by her strength and resiliency in the face of reality television rejection and explored her character as a modern mythological figure. Detail to reveal modified rosette pattern structure. A rose is the symbol of validation on “The Bachelor” and receiving a rose allows a contestant to continue on to the next week.

Jenny's Departure

Woven image of a screenshot of "The Bachelor"
Hand-woven on a TC2 jacquard loom with naturally dyed cotton and silk, Screenshot “The Bachelor,” season 22. Part of a larger series addressing modern mythology through the lens of popular culture. This image depicts a woman rejected by the lead during the second episode of the season. I was struck by her strength and resiliency in the face of reality television rejection and explored her character as a modern mythological figure.

The Martyr (Here for the Right Reasons)

Lace portrait of the "villain" of season 22 of the Bachelor in black and white surrounded by lace roses
Filet lace, fishing net, cotton thread, Screenshot from "The Bachelor" (Season 22)/ 30"x30"/ 2019 Filet lace woven on a fishing net to produce an analog pixelated image. Screenshot from Season 22 of "The Bachelor." The woman pictured is often considered the "villain" of the season. She is surrounded by roses, the symbol of choice and validation within the structure of the reality television show.

The Martyr (Here for the Right Reasons) (detail)

Detail image of a lace portrait
Filet lace, fishing net, cotton thread, Screenshot from "The Bachelor" (Season 22)/ 30"x30"/2019 Detail to reveal filet lace structure. This piece was hand woven on top of a fishing net, creating an analog form of a pixelated image.

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About Sasha

Baltimore City

Sasha Baskin's picture
Sasha Baskin’s weaving and drawing work explores the intersection of craft and classical rendering. She uses traditional weaving and lacemaking processes in combination with source imagery from reality television to address the intersections between analog and digital technologies. Trained in classical drawing, Baskin received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2014 and worked as a portrait artist for several years. Transitioning to craft and studying weaving,... more

Will You Accept This Rose?

A series of woven images addressing modern mythology through the lens of popular culture. Each piece was hand-woven on a TC2 jacquard loom with naturally dyed cotton and silk and is based on a digital still from season 22 of “The Bachelor.”

This image depicts a woman, Jenny, rejected by the lead during the second episode of the season. I was struck by her strength and resiliency in the face of reality television rejection and explored her character as a modern mythological figure.  By repeating her image in multiple large-scale weavings I created a pantheon of her digital image as a mythic figure. 

I used a modified rosette weaving pattern throughout this series- a pattern typically seen in Americana coverlet weavings.  A rose is the symbol of validation on “The Bachelor” and receiving a rose allows a contestant to continue on to the next week. Through the repetition and distortion of this rose-based weaving pattern, I offer the woman getting rejected a form of agency and control over her own roses.

  • Jenny's Departure

    Woven portrait of a woman rejected from an episode of "The Bachelor"
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22) / 115"x55"/ 2018
  • Jenny's Departure (detail)

    Detail of a woven portrait of a woman rejected from an episode of "The Bachelor" based on an inverted screenshot
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22)/ 115"x55"/ 2018
  • Jenny Rejected

    Woven portrait of a woman rejected from an episode of "The Bachelor" based on an inverted screenshot
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton and silk, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22)/ 50"x42" /2018
  • Jenny Rejected (detail)

    Woven portrait of a woman rejected from an episode of "The Bachelor"
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton and silk, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22)/ 50"x42" / 2018
  • Dramatic (Study for Jenny's Departure)

    Woven portrait of a woman rejected from an episode of "The Bachelor"
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton and silk, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22)/ 28"x48" /2018

By Any Other Name

In the Greek Myth of the judgment of Paris, three goddesses wait for a mortal to offer them an apple proclaiming the chosen goddess the most beautiful. On The Bachelor, women wait for roses delivered at overly dramatized “Rose Ceremonies” when a man makes the choice of who he wants to keep dating out of his pool of available women and sends the rest home. The rose is just a new manifestation of the apple. It is the same story over and over again. It is another symbol of acceptance and validation. The repetitive structure of each episode becomes a retelling of a Hero’s Journey: a new myth for a new era.
 
Using screenshots from The Bachelor as source material for my filet lace images, I explore reality television as a modern form of mythology. The rose as a new iconic symbol. By rendering this rose in lace I refer to lace’s historical and contemporary connotations: often found only in black or white lace for weddings or lingerie, the lace rose acts as a metaphor for the Madonna/whore paradox.
 
Each piece in this series is titled from a catchphrase popularized within the show. These phrases become mantras, almost prayer like for the contestants. The show creates a dialect and language that reference the ritualistic process. 

  • The Martyr (Here for the Right Reasons)

    Lace portrait of the "villain" of season 22 of the Bachelor in black and white surrounded by lace roses
    Filet lace, fishing net, cotton thread, Screenshot from "The Bachelor" (Season 22)/ 30"x30"/ 2019 Filet lace woven on a fishing net to produce an analog pixelated image. Screenshot from Season 22 of "The Bachelor." The woman pictured is often considered the "villain" of the season. She is surrounded by roses, the symbol of choice and validation within the structure of the reality television show.
  • The Martyr (Here for the Right Reasons) (detail)

    Detail image of a lace portrait
    Filet lace, fishing net, cotton thread, Screenshot from "The Bachelor" (Season 22)/ 30"x30"/2019 Detail to reveal filet lace structure. This piece was hand woven on top of a fishing net, creating an analog form of a pixelated image.
  • Not Here to make Friends

    Lace rose in black and white and pink and grey
    Filet Lace, fishing net, cotton thread /12"x10"/ 2019

Small Roses

A series of smaller woven works exploring the role of overshot rosette patterning on digital stills pulled from episodes of reality television. The patterning creates a veil or screen over the figures and digital images.  

In each piece, the rosette overlay functions differently, the blush of the skin, a latticework concealing the figures, or intentional distorting and glitching the image creating analog "broken pixels" as broken threads. 

As the ancestor of the modern computer, the loom’s relationship to pixel and screen are unavoidable: the 0s and 1s of binary code are a direct descendent of the overs and unders of woven threads.

  • The Rosette

    woven portrait of a woman with a rosette pattern overlaid on her cheek
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22) /27"x21"/ 2018
  • The Rosette (detail)

    detail image of a woven portrait of a woman with a rosette pattern overlaid on her cheek
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22) / 27"x21"/ 2018
  • The Rose Ceremony

    woven image of a woman holding a rose at a "rose ceremony" with a rosette pattern overlaid across her chest
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22)/ 27"x21"/ 2018
  • The Rose Ceremony (detail)

    Detail image of the rosette patterning in "The Rose Ceremony"
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22) / 27"x21"/ 2018
  • The Rose

    Woven image of a hand holding a rose. Half the image is veiled by a rosette weaving pattern
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22) / 27"x21"/ 2018
  • The Rose (detail)

    detail image of a woven rose
    Jacquard and hand-woven cotton, silk, and rayon, rosette overshot patterning, natural dye, screenshot from "The Bachelor" (season 22) / 27"x21"/ 2018

Small Portraits (Bachelor in Paradise)

Portrait of a lesser-known reality television star on the beach during filming of "Bachelor in Paradise." While on a highly produced and artificial show, the woman, appears without makeup in natural light mirroring the pose of DaVinci's "Portrait of a Woman." 

The image and pattern repeats within the woven structure, creating moments of tactile and physical glitch. The screenshot is rendered in analog pixels of overlapping threads. 

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