Block title

Work Samples

Only Degas makes the Van Gogh

Natan Lawson - Resort - Home Sweet Home
Only Degas makes the Van Gogh Acrylic on Canvas 47” x 32” 2018

Feline Frenzy

Natan Lawson - Resort - Home Sweet Home
Feline Frenzy Ink on Canvas 44” x 30” 2018

Mr. Plumbean’s House (side view)

Natan Lawson - Resort - Home Sweet Home
Mr. Plumbean’s House Plexiglass 4.5' x 7' x 3.5' 2018

Nathan Lawson

Natan Lawson - Resort - Home Sweet Home
Home Sweet Home - Resort Gallery - Install shot

Share:

About Natan

Baltimore City

Natan Lawson's picture
Natan Lawson is a Baltimore based artist. He received his BFA in painting from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2015. He received an individual artist award in sculpture through the Maryland State Arts Council in 2016 and was selected as a resident artist at the Horned Dorset Colony in the previous year.  Natan’s work is included in the Kadist collection in San Francisco, CA, and Capital One’s headquarters in MacLean, VA.

Home Sweet Home (album 1)

Home Sweet Home is Natan Lawson’s first solo exhibition in the Baltimore area and includes a new series of paintings and sculpture. The works in Home Sweet Home reference imagery found in home interiors - a nostalgic and perhaps melancholic look back at the tactility of childhood. Crafting projects, fridge drawings, bedroom decorations, wallpaper, pets, toys and games, picture books, textiles, still life paintings, floral patterns, and seasonal decorations inform the imagery that has been scanned or sourced from the internet and collaged, combined, and adjusted. This specific and loaded imagery is simultaneously autobiographical and universal, familiar to an 80s and 90s upbringing. Lawson revisits and monumentalizes these bygone aesthetics as meditation on collective and personal loss. This series builds on Lawson’s previous, abstract iconography sourced from a vast archive of printed material, referencing vintage computer graphics, graphic design, logos, and instruction manuals.

In this new body of work, Lawson continues his use of modified CNC and vinyl cutter machines to explore and subvert grid-oriented imagery. These mechanical units have been hacked and altered to use the axis-bound arm to execute imagery with a range of traditional artist media including acrylic paint and Copic ink applied with brushes and airbrush. Lawson’s machines effectively “print” manipulated digital images that are sent from a computer, requiring separation of the files into color layers much like other printmaking processes. The process has parallels to and visual echoes of traditional methods of creating images on a grid including textile production techniques like cross stitch and weaving. This alternative approach to painting involves stops and starts, swapping colors, misregistration, error, and imperfection, all of which become part of each final piece and reflect a process that is not fully streamlined and predictable.

Home Sweet Home (album 2)

Home Sweet Home is Natan Lawson’s first solo exhibition in the Baltimore area and includes a new series of paintings and sculpture. The works in Home Sweet Home reference imagery found in home interiors - a nostalgic and perhaps melancholic look back at the tactility of childhood. Crafting projects, fridge drawings, bedroom decorations, wallpaper, pets, toys and games, picture books, textiles, still life paintings, floral patterns, and seasonal decorations inform the imagery that has been scanned or sourced from the internet and collaged, combined, and adjusted. This specific and loaded imagery is simultaneously autobiographical and universal, familiar to an 80s and 90s upbringing. Lawson revisits and monumentalizes these bygone aesthetics as meditation on collective and personal loss. This series builds on Lawson’s previous, abstract iconography sourced from a vast archive of printed material, referencing vintage computer graphics, graphic design, logos, and instruction manuals. In this new body of work, Lawson continues his use of modified CNC and vinyl cutter machines to explore and subvert grid-oriented imagery. These mechanical units have been hacked and altered to use the axis-bound arm to execute imagery with a range of traditional artist media including acrylic paint and Copic ink applied with brushes and airbrush. Lawson’s machines effectively “print” manipulated digital images that are sent from a computer, requiring separation of the files into color layers much like other printmaking processes. The process has parallels to and visual echoes of traditional methods of creating images on a grid including textile production techniques like cross stitch and weaving. This alternative approach to painting involves stops and starts, swapping colors, misregistration, error, and imperfection, all of which become part of each final piece and reflect a process that is not fully streamlined and predictable.

Home Sweet Home (album 3)

Home Sweet Home is Natan Lawson’s first solo exhibition in the Baltimore area and includes a new series of paintings and sculpture. The works in Home Sweet Home reference imagery found in home interiors - a nostalgic and perhaps melancholic look back at the tactility of childhood. Crafting projects, fridge drawings, bedroom decorations, wallpaper, pets, toys and games, picture books, textiles, still life paintings, floral patterns, and seasonal decorations inform the imagery that has been scanned or sourced from the internet and collaged, combined, and adjusted. This specific and loaded imagery is simultaneously autobiographical and universal, familiar to an 80s and 90s upbringing. Lawson revisits and monumentalizes these bygone aesthetics as meditation on collective and personal loss. This series builds on Lawson’s previous, abstract iconography sourced from a vast archive of printed material, referencing vintage computer graphics, graphic design, logos, and instruction manuals.

In this new body of work, Lawson continues his use of modified CNC and vinyl cutter machines to explore and subvert grid-oriented imagery. These mechanical units have been hacked and altered to use the axis-bound arm to execute imagery with a range of traditional artist media including acrylic paint and Copic ink applied with brushes and airbrush. Lawson’s machines effectively “print” manipulated digital images that are sent from a computer, requiring separation of the files into color layers much like other printmaking processes. The process has parallels to and visual echoes of traditional methods of creating images on a grid including textile production techniques like cross stitch and weaving. This alternative approach to painting involves stops and starts, swapping colors, misregistration, error, and imperfection, all of which become part of each final piece and reflect a process that is not fully streamlined and predictable.

​​

Home Sweet Home (album 4)

Home Sweet Home is Natan Lawson’s first solo exhibition in the Baltimore area and includes a new series of paintings and sculpture. The works in Home Sweet Home reference imagery found in home interiors - a nostalgic and perhaps melancholic look back at the tactility of childhood. Crafting projects, fridge drawings, bedroom decorations, wallpaper, pets, toys and games, picture books, textiles, still life paintings, floral patterns, and seasonal decorations inform the imagery that has been scanned or sourced from the internet and collaged, combined, and adjusted. This specific and loaded imagery is simultaneously autobiographical and universal, familiar to an 80s and 90s upbringing. Lawson revisits and monumentalizes these bygone aesthetics as meditation on collective and personal loss. This series builds on Lawson’s previous, abstract iconography sourced from a vast archive of printed material, referencing vintage computer graphics, graphic design, logos, and instruction manuals.

In this new body of work, Lawson continues his use of modified CNC and vinyl cutter machines to explore and subvert grid-oriented imagery. These mechanical units have been hacked and altered to use the axis-bound arm to execute imagery with a range of traditional artist media including acrylic paint and Copic ink applied with brushes and airbrush. Lawson’s machines effectively “print” manipulated digital images that are sent from a computer, requiring separation of the files into color layers much like other printmaking processes. The process has parallels to and visual echoes of traditional methods of creating images on a grid including textile production techniques like cross stitch and weaving. This alternative approach to painting involves stops and starts, swapping colors, misregistration, error, and imperfection, all of which become part of each final piece and reflect a process that is not fully streamlined and predictable.

¡Splat! (2016)

PRESS RELEASE:
¡Splat! is an exhibit of new works by Baltimore-based artist Natan Lawson, featuring a dozen machine-collaborated works on canvas. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, Natan has both modified and designed custom machines that he utilizes in his works, applying acrylic paint, permanent marker, gel pen, and airbrush techniques. He is heavily involved in every stage of the process from the design to the operation of the machines, sometimes collaborating alongside them by hand.

While the machine might inspire a curiosity about the process involved in the work’s creation, Lawson embraces it only as a tool capable of producing the aesthetic results he is after: Playful yet rigorous exploration of mark making, pattern, hyper-saturation, misregistration, and distortion through layering and line.

Lawson’s work is abstract and reflects his primary interest in relationships between color, shape and space, but visual cues and titles invite the viewer to and their own narratives.

(other works from 2016)

  • 1

    48"x 68" acrylic and sharpie on canvas
  • 2

    48" x 30" sharpie on raw canvas
  • 3

    pen on paper 8" x 10"
  • 4

    48" x 32" arcylic on gessoed canvas
  • 5

    8" x 10" pen on paper
  • 6

    30" x 22" marker on paper
  • 7

    40” x 29” acrylic on gessoed canvas
  • 8

    40” x 29” acrylic on raw canvas

Savers (2015)

Solo Show
Ceramics and Paintings

I am blueprint. I imprint legacy.
I wear the jeans of my forbears, recut,
cutting to the quick of recognized purpose,
repurposing the raw fuel into me processed
as living art, constituted of info-bits electric
and parts eclectic. So, I propose,
for what I now compose,
the forthcoming metric.

My fingers tear apart and stitch, as hands
circling the vital clock; tickling the spine
of our grandfather clock. Our common
denominators and common multiples
are the selfsame, an echo
from then to now, rebounding
off the walls, unchanged for their parts,
but with a sum new each season.
A genetic code decoded
through reason. Rhyming action revealed
as I take what I saw
and make into what I see. And we all
take this form again to its next
reconstitution, of this circle
every revolution is a recycling
of the early into later,
the now into soon.
Toward this ever-moving point, my prints sprint,
generated in the rift between past and present, presenting
itself in monochrome,
its home in vacuum-creation,
so I go from what I know
and breathe this new-old narration:

Variation of striation of paths
requires exploration. If in the light
of old answers enlightenment eludes me
I’ll dip into shaded pits
to relay colored intuition.
The textures I brush with sticky fingers,
peeling away what I can reuse—
the abused shapes in the negative
spaces of everyday.

Such techniques limber my eye,
so my mind may bend as I need it to, mending
a firmament never broken, always passed on.
Mine are fingers sewing in circles, therefore
they allow hollow revisitation of the new to the old;
as a revenant lurker about my work, they resurrect
the once-reflected, the scraps rejected. I save
what others infected with the reproducing virus of inspiration
have left to the discard pile. It’s no waste to wile
away some time, over misplaced components
to linger, and if on reused tropes
I lay my finger, still I can’t dope myself with genesis
when there is here cause to reminisce on what’s gone before,
as it flows into what comes next. So to proceed
composition is re-composition, developing
a script on envelope, a letter written
and mailed to me in the beginning of beginnings.
Which, of course, never ended. Instead,
this distended edict envelops me
and evolves in its own formation, with little useful
distinction between
what I intended
and what happened. The product?

Reformation is transliteration—literally:
the conversion of a text
from one script to another.
I plain-tell you this: of the new,
the old is always mother.

Connect with Natan

Natan's Curated Collection

View Natan's favorite works from other Baker Artists