Work samples

  • Habitat I
    glass, sand from Utah desert, 2019
  • Habitat II
    glass, moss, silicone, 2019
  • Creaturas
    Wood, 2019
  • Cohabitation
    installation documentation of Cohabitation, 2019

About Mary

Baltimore City - Station North A&E District
Mary Baum is a multidisciplinary artist from Oregon. Her work deals with themes of belief and mysticism; the connection between the natural and spiritual worlds; and the relationship between magic and miracle. She received her BFA from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and her MFA from Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland. She has exhibited internationally at Gallery 303 (Provo, Ut), the MIA show (Pasadena, California), Alice Gallery (Salt Lake City), the… more

Habitation

  • Habitat I
    Sculpture, 2019, glass, sand, silicone
  • Habitat II
    sculpture, 2019, glass, moss, silicone
  • Habitat III
    sculpture, 2019, glass, sand, silicone, wood

Cohabitation

  • Creatura
    sculpture, 2019, wood
  • Creatura
    sculpture, 2019, wood
  • Creatura
    Sculpture, 2019, wood
  • Creatura
    sculpture, 2019, wood
  • Creatura
    installation of Cohabitation 2019
  • Creatura
    Installation of Cohabitation
  • Creatura
    installation of Cohabitation, 2019

Where Two Worlds Touch II, 2018

For the last few years I have collected rocks wherever I go, I brought some of these rocks to Baltimore with me when I moved. I did not have any specific end in mind with these, but I kept them because they felt important to me. Rocks are objects of great importance because they are old, they are something that has been on earth since the beginning, and I feel that by holding it and having it, I can connect myself to the powers that created it. I began to make shells for these rocks out of clear glass. These stones became something beyond my original concept of them. They touched on ideas of the soul and eternity, of adoration and reliquary, protection and futility. They were humorous. They became objects that I felt straddled both the physical and spiritual worlds. They became something far beyond myself.
  • Where Two Worlds Touch II
  • Where Two Worlds Touch II
  • Where Two Worlds Touch II
  • Where Two Worlds Touch II
  • Where Two Worlds Touch II
  • Where Two Worlds Touch II

Point of Entry, 2017

  • Point of Entry, video, 2016
  • Point of Entry, video, 2016
  • Point of Entry, photo, 2016
  • Point of Entry, photo, 2016
  • Point of Entry, photo, 2016
  • Point of Entry, photo, 2016
  • Point of Entry, Site Specific Installation, 2017
  • Point of Entry, Site Specific Installation, 2017
  • Point of Entry, Site Specific Installation, 2017
  • Point of Entry, Site Specific Installation, 2017

Waiting for Echo, 2016

This piece touches on many diverging ideas. Inspiration was drawn from religious architecture, the origin story of Sir Lancelot of the Arthurian Legends, the myth of Narcissus and Echo, and the oft-used fantasy trope of a reflective surface becoming a portal or entryway to another world. This pool becomes a connecting point between the physical and spiritual worlds and a mysterious place of unknown significance.
  • Waiting for Echo, photo, 2016
  • Waiting for Echo, photo, 2016
  • Waiting for Echo, photo, 2016
  • Waiting for Echo, photo, 2016

Where Two Worlds Touch, 2016

For the last 5 years I have collected rocks wherever I go, I brought some of these rocks to Baltimore with me when I moved. I did not have any specific end in mind with these, but I kept them because they felt important to me. Rocks are objects of great importance because they are old, they are something that has been on earth since the beginning, and I feel that by holding it and having it, I can connect myself to the powers that created it. I began to make shells for these rocks out of clear glass. These stones became something beyond my original concept of them. They touched on ideas of the soul and eternity, of adoration and reliquary, protection and futility. They were humorous. They became objects that I felt straddled both the physical and spiritual worlds. They became something far beyond myself.
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, silicone, stone form Utah, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, silicone, dirt from Utah, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, silicone, stone from Utah, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, silicone, stone from Maryland, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, mirror, silicone, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, silicone, stone from Norway, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, solder, stone from Maine, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, silicone, stone from Maine, 2016
  • Where Two Worlds Touch, glass, silicone, stone from Idaho, 2016

Moonstones, 2017

This body of work explores the shape of the sphere and the importance it has in the universe as well as the human world.  It is a deeply significant shape that resonates with meaning and function. In this work I used man-made balls and covered them in natural materials to bring the natural universe and man-made objects together in one.