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Work Samples

So I went to New York to be born again, oil, acrylic, plastic, foam, paper, wood metal, 22x20x16 inches, 2015

So I went to New York to be born again, oil, acrylic, plastic, foam, paper, wood metal, 22x20x16 inches, 2015

Satan owns the fallen world

Satan owns the fallen world, oil, acrylic, charcoal, silk, fur, wood, plastic, 2015, 2017

5. I don't care.jpg

I don’t care if you’re not equal to me for a while, 4x8x4 inches, oil, steel, wood, linen, plaster, plastic, 2016

Picking up the pieces, Loyola University

His roundish, scholarly stomach was covered with a layer of soft, dark hair, his hands and nails well cared for, 12x9x8 inches, oil, acrylic, foam, wood, paper, 2017; I had worked for nearly two years for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body, 13.5x15x5 inches, oil, spray paint, linen, fur, fake fur, wood, metal, 2017; I don’t know how this works but I know I don’t like it, 21x12x7 inches, oil, wood, plastic, plaster, 2017; A great man’s face shows the beauty of his work, 8x10x11 inches oil, acrylic, plastic, rubber, plaster, linen, wood , 2017; Sweater vest, b

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About Jim

Baltimore County

Jim Condron's picture
Originally from Long Island, NY and Connecticut, Jim Condron lives and works in Baltimore, MD.  Condron earned his MFA at the Leroy E. Hofffberger School of Painting at the Maryland Institute College of Art (2004) and a BA in Art and English from Colby College, Waterville, ME (1992). He also studied at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture (1993-'95). Since 1993, Condron has studied with Rohini Ralby, the artist's mentor. His work appears nationally and internationally in... more

Dimiishing Returns at Goucher College's Silber Art Gallery

“Jim Condron: Diminishing Returns,” a solo exhibition showcasing over twenty paintings and new sculptural works will be presented at Goucher College’s Silber Art Gallery in the Sandy J. Unger Athenaeum from January 30 through March 15, 2018.

“Jim Condron: Diminishing Returns,” incites viewers to examine the application of the economic principle of the law of diminishing returns to painting and art making in the 21st century. The paintings in the show range in size from 5x6 inches to 90x144 inches. Each painting gradually increases in size while maintaining the project’s foundational proportion. The sculptural works in the show reference farming practices and consider the framework by which the economic concept of the law of diminishing returns was founded and explained. The agriculturally based sculptures and abstract paintings also investigate the law of diminishing marginal utility. A highlight of the show is a sculpture made from a vintage 1940’s General GG tractor in a bed of Red Bird Peppermint Puffs. Visitors are invited to experience the principle of diminishing marginal utility by eating as many of the candies as they like.

“Thinking about the economic concepts diminishing marginal returns and diminishing marginal utility and the extent to which they apply to art raises interesting questions about how one can view art from the
artist’s, consumer’s, and museum curator’s perspectives.”

-Dr. David W. Findlay, Pugh Family Professor of Economics of Colby College, ME.

Through the paintings in this exhibition Condron presents a haptic convergence of scale, size, color, texture, and dimensionality. The works explore how the physical size of a painting impacts the meaning and power of a work of art for both the artist and the viewer. The paintings in the show are hung in succession vertically and horizontally from the largest works to the smallest works. It is the artist’s hope that as the viewer confronts the exhibition and then each painted canvas, the importance of the scale and size of the work diminishes and the viewer is absorbed in the experience of each individual work of art.
The sculptural works in the exhibition, constructed from vintage farm equipment, are poignant reminders of America’s rich, though tainted, agricultural past and the economic challenges American farmers face in the year 2018 at a moment in history when the commodification of art is unregulated.

Picking up the pieces at Loyola University, Baltimore, MD, October-November, 2017

The exhibition Picking Up the Pieces includes over 35 works of art by one of this year’s top Pollock-Krasner award winning artists Jim Condron. Condron’s pieces express humor, memory, and beauty through the combination and interaction of everyday objects, castoff remnants, and paint. Each sculpture and painting is the artist’s concoction of imagery conveying nostalgia, jocosity, and melancholy. To create his sculptural works, Condron picks up bits of physical objects that interact with mental images preserved from his personal life and art history. Worldly fragments, such as a 1970s tennis ball can, candy wrappers, or a shovel handle, transform into artistic spectacles through the artist’s craft and engagement with his subject. Objects such as the 1970s tennis ball can is at once banal and poignant, since the artist spent countless hours as a child by the courts as his mother played. Condron’s huddles of broken materials break from abstraction by proclaiming the reality of everyday life through the inclusion of domestic cultural references. Like his sculptures, Condron constructs his paintings by mixing discovered color and textural combinations with collections of visual fragments he sources from the art world and his life. Each sculpture or painting is titled with a textual fragment from a story that intends to add to the work’s discourse rather than naming or defining it. Condron’s visual explorations test the limits of color, form, texture, and the haptic.

  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Left to Right: If you hide your ignorance, no one will hit you and you'll never learn, 29x29x21 inches, spray paint, foam, 2017; She was interested in his work. But it really doesn’t matter what he did, he could have been an anthropologist, 33x49 inches, oil, foam on linen, 2015
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    In the Case: The son of an ancient friend, oil, fur, plastic, plaster, wood, 21x6x4 inches, 2015; She stole chalk and erasers, from school. I think it was simply she didn't want to teach anymore, 20x4x4 inches, oil, leather, fur, wood, 2017; The lines that penetrate us are slender, plaster, acrylic, oil, fur, wood, 14x6x6 inches, 2017;
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Left to Right: It's a lot of funnels and lot of water poured down the spout and out the bottom, and them telling us it's wine when it's not, 39x40 inches, oil on linen, 2017; There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth, 7x28x4 inches, oil, spray paint, acrylic, foam, cement, wood, 2017
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Shelves: He wanted to sin with another of his kind, 9x7x3 inches, wood, fur, leather, mesh, plaster, cotton, 2015; He's a bloody four-letter man, 6x10x3 inches, oil, cloth, plastic, wood, acrylic, rubber, 2015; Satan owns the fallen world, 10x8x7 inches, oil, acrylic, spray paint, cotton, charcoal, wood, plastic, fur, , 2015, 2017; I didn’t spit it out: it was one of the few things connecting us, 5x2x3 inches, oil, cement, fur, wood, 2015; My nobler part to my gross body’s treason, 8x6x4 inches, oil, acrylic, spray paint, foam, cement, plastic, 2015; It was impossible to
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Installation of Picking up the pieces, Loyola University, Baltimore, MD, October-November, 2017
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Left to Right: I had the standard bread and then the round bread, 39x40 inches, oil on linen, 2017; I'm talking for her because her throat hurtst, 36x42 inches, oil, spray paint on linen, 2017; No sweat, he deadpanned, 22x19x7 inches oil, spray paint, foam, spray foam, plastic, cement, 2017; On the surface my days were the same as ever, 14x7x5 inches, oil, spray paint, foam, plastic, cement, 2017; The bones becoming light, 70x68 inches, oil on linen, 2015
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Left to Right: I'm talking for her because her throat hurtst, 36x42 inches, oil, spray paint on linen, 2017 No sweat, he deadpanned, 22x19x7 inches oil, spray paint, foam, spray foam, plastic, cement, 2017 On the surface my days were the same as ever, 14x7x5 inches, oil, spray paint, foam, plastic, cement, 2017
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Left to Right: His roundish, scholarly stomach was covered with a layer of soft, dark hair, his hands and nails well cared for, 12x9x8 inches, oil, acrylic, foam, wood, paper, 2017; I had worked for nearly two years for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body, 13.5x15x5 inches, oil, spray paint, linen, fur, fake fur, wood, metal, 2017; I don’t know how this works but I know I don’t like it, 21x12x7 inches, oil, wood, plastic, plaster, 2017; A great man’s face shows the beauty of his work, 8x10x11 inches oil, acrylic, plastic, rubber, plaster, linen, wood , 2017;
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    Left to Right: I had worked for nearly two years for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body, 13.5x15x5 inches, oil, spray paint, linen, fur, fake fur, wood, metal, 2017; I don’t know how this works but I know I don’t like it, 21x12x7 inches, oil, wood, plastic, plaster, 2017; A great man’s face shows the beauty of his work, 8x10x11 inches oil, acrylic, plastic, rubber, plaster, linen, wood, 2017; Sweater vest, bad idea, 21x14x4 inches, oil, acrylic, plaster, charcoal, wood, 2017
  • Picking up the pieces, Loyola University Installed

    So I was full of trouble, full as I could be; and didn't know what to do, 72x52 inches oil, paper, feathers, wool, 2017

In the back of the fridge

Thickly painted abstractions that incorporate found objects, wood, scrap metal, concrete, plaster, and repurposed animal fur. The works converse with the Sienese and early Renaissance paintings by Giotto, Sassetta, and Fra Angelico; some works confront more contemporary works. Titles are taken from literature by a range of great authors such as Don DeLillo, James Salter, Anton Chekhov, Nikolai Gogol, Oscar Wilde, Hunter Thompson, Kurt Vonnegut, Ernest Hemmingway, Henry Miller, Anais Nin, and others.

In the bankers box

A series of bricolages

67th and Park

Paintings

It's not because I'm old

Paintings after Proto Renaissance masters

Installed

  • Canton

    Beliefs are meant to cleave us to the bone, oil on linen, 68x85 inches, 2013 (Canton, MD)
  • Goose

    2013
  • Lite

    And float
  • Ham

    You will probably recognize the outlines of this plot
  • Pollock

    On the floor
  • Kid

    Critically under-theorized
  • J.W. in Maine

    I'm getting bored with dying as with everything else
  • Band

    The Bird

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Jim's Curated Collection

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