Block title

Work Samples

Haze

“Haze” acrylic on panel, 2019 60” x 60”
“Haze” acrylic on panel, 2019 60” x 60”

Humanity, the only living organism aware of it’s own mortality

“Humanity, the only living organism aware of it’s own mortality” Acrylic on panel, 2019
“Humanity, the only living organism aware of it’s own mortality” Acrylic on panel, 2019 36” x 36”

Pity Party

"Pity Party" Acrylic and Oil on panel 60" x 60", 2019
"Pity Party" Acrylic and Oil on panel 60" x 60", 2019

The weight of posture in maintaining false happiness II

“The weight of posture in maintaining false happiness II” Resin and found takeaway bag, 2019 3” x 10” x 7”
“The weight of posture in maintaining false happiness II” Resin and found takeaway bag, 2019 3” x 10” x 7”

Share:

About Jeremy

Baltimore County

Jeremy Jirsa's picture
Jeremy Jirsa was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1992. He graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) with a Bachelors of Fine Arts in General Fine Arts and a minor in Art History in 2014 and Master of Arts in Teaching from MICA in 2015. In 2017 he received his Master of Fine Arts at The University of Pennsylvania. His work has been exhibited up and down the East Coast as well as Florence, Italy.

2020 works

Masquerade: 2D works

While bringing my tourette’s syndrome to the forefront of my practice I find my work exploring​ tones of isolation, self-medication, and depression, ultimately offering a perspective of tourette's through a false façade of perceived reality. Living with such an ailment has left me in chronic pain and at times unable to function due to extreme ticing. Leaving one to feel trapped and as if they are a prisoner with in their own body. Through the work my goal is to explore this psychological space that is integral to the experience of tourettes itself with in the internal and external environment of one's being. I use the disposed take away bag that usually reads “Have a Nice Day” as a motif. I see the bag as a tragic figure that is present in everyday life but ultimately leads a second life as it is used and disposed of. Always covering and holding what is inside while reminding its audience to “Have a Nice Day”. The pain TS sufferers experience at most times is suppressed and hidden. We can’t necessarily control our tics but at times we can fight to suppress them in order to hide what is truly happening until we physically can no longer suppress our tics and have to release everything that has been boiling underneath the surface. Hiding our physical and psychological distress from the public and dealing with the suppressed fallout on our own, while we present a false composure the world. ​The works become a facade and a stand in for the body, creating an externalization of one's psychological space and mental process. The hiding and recognizing, the play between facing aspects of one’s self that may be too hard to deal with, while simultaneously keeping and maintaining outward composure.

Masquerade: 3D and Interdisiplinary works

Masquerade: 3D and Interdisiplinary works
While bringing my tourette’s syndrome to the forefront of my practice I find my work exploring​ tones of isolation, self-medication, and depression, ultimately offering a perspective of tourette's through a false façade of perceived reality. Living with such an ailment has left me in chronic pain and at times unable to function due to extreme ticing. Leaving one to feel trapped and as if they are a prisoner with in their own body. Through the work my goal is to explore this psychological space that is integral to the experience of tourettes itself with in the internal and external environment of one's being. I use the disposed take away bag that usually reads “Have a Nice Day” as a motif. I see the bag as a tragic figure that is present in everyday life but ultimately leads a second life as it is used and disposed of. Always covering and holding what is inside while reminding its audience to “Have a Nice Day”. The pain TS sufferers experience at most times is suppressed and hidden. We can’t necessarily control our tics but at times we can fight to suppress them in order to hide what is truly happening until we physically can no longer suppress our tics and have to release everything that has been boiling underneath the surface. Hiding our physical and psychological distress from the public and dealing with the suppressed fallout on our own, while we present a false composure the world. ​The works become a facade and a stand in for the body, creating an externalization of one's psychological space and mental process. The hiding and recognizing, the play between facing aspects of one’s self that may be too hard to deal with, while simultaneously keeping and maintaining outward composure.

Installations views of select works from "Masquerade"

Installations views of select works from "Masquerade"

Drawing

  • Mainting

    Maintaining, charcoal and graphite on rives bfk, 2019, 22'x 30"
    Maintaining, charcoal and graphite on rives bfk, 2019, 22'x 30"
  • Untitled

    Untitled, charcoal and graphite on rives bfk, 2019, 22'x 30"
    Untitled, charcoal and graphite on rives bfk, 2019, 22'x 30"
  • touch

    Touch, charcoal and graphite on rives bfk, 2019, 22'x 30"
    Touch, charcoal and graphite on rives bfk, 2019, 22'x 30"

Connect with Jeremy

Jeremy's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.