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About Jaimes

Jaimes Mayhew's picture
Jaimes Mayhew (b. 1979) is an artist, organizer and educator. His artwork is often collaborative, interdisciplinary, and based in conceptual research of social and cultural phenomena. His work has been shown both nationally and internationally, including Eyebeam (NYC), Goucher College (Baltimore), and Hoffmannsgallerí (Reykjavík, Iceland). He is the recipient of several awards including a Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award (2015), a Fulbright Fellowship in Iceland (2011-12), and a... more

Various Projects

This is a selection of projects that did not fit into other categories ranging from the years 2006-2010.

  • Things That Might Have Happened (detail)

    Things That Might Have Happened is an exploration of the past, present and future of the Chelsea Piers, specifically Segment 4, from Horatio Street to Clarkson Street, including the highly contested Pier 45, or the Christopher Street Pier. As part of the Conflux festival exploring psychogeography in New York City, Richard James Supa Jr. and James Mayhew chose to explore the uses of the pier, both past and present, and how people feel about the changes being made and what, if any changes should come to the area.
  • Thing That Might Have Happened (2006)

    Things That Might Have Happened is an exploration of the past, present and future of the Chelsea Piers, specifically Segment 4, from Horatio Street to Clarkson Street, including the highly contested Pier 45, or the Christopher Street Pier. As part of the Conflux festival exploring psychogeography in New York City, Richard James Supa Jr. and James Mayhew chose to explore the uses of the pier, both past and present, and how people feel about the changes being made and what, if any changes should come to the area.
  • Things That Have Probably Never Been Done Here Before (2009)

    Things That Have (Probably) Never Been Done Before was an experiment and open invitation to create new behaviors for the gallery space at Delaware County Community College. In an attempt to intervene with social behaviors in a gallery environment, participants were asked to create and document everyday micro-actions that they believed had not happened in the space before using index cards, a set of wireless surveillance cameras and recording device. Whether or not these actions had or had not occurred in this place is inconsequential- there is no way to prove or disprove the occurrence of the
  • A Drill For Reimagining Wall Street (2009)

    A Drill For Reimagining Wall Street was a participatory drill at Conflux City that sought to reimagine the best-case scenario for Wall street both as a concept and a physical space, and to temporarily intervene with the tourist activity in the area. This project was perhaps a little ahead of it's time, and pre-dated the Occupy Movement. Special thanks to Shannon Allen, Liz Knafo and Liz Hodgson.
  • Cut Piece With Transgender Body (2010)

    This piece was performed on April 30, 2010 as a part of Hell, No!, curated by David Louis Fierman and RJ Supa at the Convent of St. Cecilia in Brooklyn, NY. Visitors to the convent were greeted at the entryway to the chapel by a docent who gave them a card with the following text: Cut Piece With Transgender Body (dedicated to Yoko Ono): Please use the scissors at the altar to cut his clothes away. Video and stills courtesy of Angie Young.
  • Accumulations/Temporary Occupations (detail) (2010)

    Accumulation/Temporary Occupations is a gallery installation and an organized series of events taking place from April 8-24, 2010 at University of Maryland, Baltimore County for my MFA Thesis Exhibition. In the gallery, stationary bikes were used to produce electrical power in the gallery that both illuminates a marquee sign and charges a battery. The battery, as an accumulation of power, was used to provide energy for a series of public, outdoor events that took place in the immediate area of the CADVC, and were organized by artists that I invited to be a part of the show.
  • Accumulations/Temporary Occupations (detail) (2010)

    Accumulation/Temporary Occupations is a gallery installation and an organized series of events taking place from April 8-24, 2010 at University of Maryland, Baltimore County for my MFA Thesis Exhibition. In the gallery, stationary bikes were used to produce electrical power in the gallery that both illuminates a marquee sign and charges a battery. The battery, as an accumulation of power, was used to provide energy for a series of public, outdoor events that took place in the immediate area of the CADVC, and were organized by artists that I invited to be a part of the show.
  • Accumulations/Temporary Occupations (detail) (2010)

    Accumulation/Temporary Occupations is a gallery installation and an organized series of events taking place from April 8-24, 2010 at University of Maryland, Baltimore County for my MFA Thesis Exhibition. In the gallery, stationary bikes were used to produce electrical power in the gallery that both illuminates a marquee sign and charges a battery. The battery, as an accumulation of power, was used to provide energy for a series of public, outdoor events that took place in the immediate area of the CADVC, and were organized by artists that I invited to be a part of the show.
  • Accumulations/Temporary Occupations (2010)

    Accumulation/Temporary Occupations is a gallery installation and an organized series of events taking place from April 8-24, 2010 at University of Maryland, Baltimore County for my MFA Thesis Exhibition. In the gallery, stationary bikes were used to produce electrical power in the gallery that both illuminates a marquee sign and charges a battery. The battery, as an accumulation of power, was used to provide energy for a series of public, outdoor events that took place in the immediate area of the CADVC, and were organized by artists that I invited to be a part of the show.

The Institute for Infinitely Small Things

I have been working with the Institute for Infinitely Small Things since 2005, and actually visited Baltimore for the first time to perform with the Institute at the 2005 Transmodern Festival. From the Institute's website:
The Institute for Infinitely Small Things conducts creative, participatory research that aims to temporarily transform public spaces and instigate dialogue about democracy, spatial justice and everyday life. The Institute’s projects use performance, conversation and unexpected interventions to investigate social and political “tiny things”. Based mostly in Boston, MA, and occasionally under the leadership of kanarinka, James Manning, Jaimes Mayhew, Forest Purnell or Nicole Siggins, the group’s membership is varied and interdisciplinary.

  • Corporate Commands: Enjoy Life (2005)

    Performances of corporate commands (ads in the imperative) where they occur in the urban landscape. We try to perform each command as literally as possible. There have been more than 15 performances of corporate commands in the U.S. and Canada in public and private urban spaces.
  • Corporate Commands: Say It With Flowers (2005)

    This performance took place near Eddie's Market in Baltimore as a part of the Transmodern Age Festival. Performances of corporate commands (ads in the imperative) where they occur in the urban landscape. We try to perform each command as literally as possible. There have been more than 15 performances of corporate commands in the U.S. and Canada in public and private urban spaces.
  • Corporate Commands: Say It With Flowers (2005)

    This performance took place near Eddie's Market in Baltimore as a part of the Transmodern Age Festival. Performances of corporate commands (ads in the imperative) where they occur in the urban landscape. We try to perform each command as literally as possible. There have been more than 15 performances of corporate commands in the U.S. and Canada in public and private urban spaces.
  • Corporate Commands: Rollover (2004)

    Performances of corporate commands (ads in the imperative) where they occur in the urban landscape. We try to perform each command as literally as possible. There have been more than 15 performances of corporate commands in the U.S. and Canada in public and private urban spaces.
  • Corporate Commands

    2004 - present. Performances of corporate commands (ads in the imperative) where they occur in the urban landscape. We try to perform each command as literally as possible. There have been more than 15 performances of corporate commands in the U.S. and Canada in public and private urban spaces.
  • 57 Things To Do For Free in Harvard Square (2006)

    The Institute was commissioned to do a work for a public video screen in Harvard Square, an outdoor mall in Cambridge, MA. The resulting work is a video guidebook for tourists in Harvard Square which instructs them in 57 things they can do for fun, leisure and entertainment without spending any money. Shot and edited by Jaimes Mayhew and Nicole Siggins.
  • The City Formerly Known as Cambridge

    2006-8. What would the city look like if we could rename all of our public spaces, right now? The Institute invited members of the public to RENAME places in Cambridge, MA, for the 2008 publication of a new map of "The City Formerly Known as Cambridge".
  • Transgender Bathroom Dedication

    2010. Transgender Bathroom Dedication dedicates bathrooms at MFA Boston to Chrissy Pollis and Dean Spade, both victims of transgender hate crimes that took plate in bathrooms in Maryland and New York, respectively. Transgender Dedication placards are available for purchase or loan to interested parties.
  • Failure Suppport Archive (screenshot)

    Art projects fail a lot, particularly those that are participatory, public and/or social. They fail for different reasons and cause myriad revelations. Nevertheless, the structures that we use to talk about these works and contexts where they are presented often don’t leave room for discussing the failures plainly and objectively. We’re interested in failure– in its relationship to creative production, artistic rhetoric and public presentation.
  • Failure Support Group

    Art projects fail a lot, particularly those that are participatory, public and/or social. They fail for different reasons and cause myriad revelations. Nevertheless, the structures that we use to talk about these works and contexts where they are presented often don’t leave room for discussing the failures plainly and objectively. We’re interested in failure– in its relationship to creative production, artistic rhetoric and public presentation.

Autonomous Energy Mobile Research Lab (Iceland)

This is photo documentation of events that I hosted around Iceland with the Autonomous Energy Mobile Research Lab while on a Fulbright grant in the 2011-12 academic year. I used the mobile lab setup as a catalyst for conversations about electricity usage in Iceland, and collected stories on postcards.

Energy Awareness Month

Energy Awareness Month was an exhibition organized by Jaimes Mayhew and the Autonomous Energy Research Lab, presented at Gallery CA in Baltimore, MD. explored electricity and our relationship with the production, consumption, and creative inspiration that can be drawn from it. The artists included were Jaimes Mayhew, Steve Bradley, Marian April Glebes, Tim Nohe and Services United. The exhibition ran from October 6-28, 2012.

This documentation includes work from all involved artists.

Relations (animated GIF series)

As a way to change relationships in imagery between landscapes and humans, this series of animated GIFs portrays relationships that have been "queered", or made strange. Each GIF produces power in ways that do not produce power, but because they are GIF images, they are always animated, looping quietly in the background.

  • American Powered Paper Turbine (animated GIF)

    *click image to see animation* paper, thread This animation was shot in front of a window facing an Alcoa Aluminum smelter in Eskifjordur, Iceland, which is powered by a nearby, controversial hydro-electric powerstation.
  • Relations: I Am Generating Power (animatedGIF)

    *click image to view animation" This is a video performance piece, in which I recorded each portion of a performance of energy production on separate layers of video to produce a looping, autonomous performance of power production.
  • EnergyFromTheLand/EnergyForTheLand(animatedGIF)

    *click image to see GIF animation* In front of a geothermal electricity plant, I used my bicycle to produce electricity that powered a grow light, bringing light to the moss on the rocks in the dark Icelandic Winter.

Post Landscape

These images are the result of using a technique that includes using photo software to auto-stitch images taken out of a window of a moving car. The results are manufactured landscapes made from images that were largely unplanned and spontaneous. The glitches in color and shape matching, paired with the moving perspective in these images creates disjunctions where towers float away in the sky, beautifully engineered structures stop and start at random in the desert landscape, and new logics of visual ecology are formed.

Ways To Change The Body/Land

Inspired by my experience as a transgender person from a family of geologists and ecologists, Ways To Change The Body/Land is a series of instruction works that describe ways that a body or landscape (a body/land) is changed in social, political, cultural, physical or ecological contexts. These instructions are abstract, and relate to the assigning of identity and use-value, inciting a call to action but not assigning the power that is needed to follow through. This leaves room for questions- if one wanted to change a body/land by assessing value, what kind of value should be assessed? Would taking out a life insurance policy assess value? Would estimating available resources assess value? All of these works seek to acknowledge the constant flux of a body/land in a perpetual state of becoming. Although I do not believe that landscapes and bodies are qualitatively the same, I believe that we assign meaning to both in similar ways.

I also send out instructions for changing a body/land on Twitter (@aerlab) and Facebook (The Autonomous Energy Research Lab).

Niagara Falls Without Water, 1969 + 2014

Applique quilt
6'8" x 10'
Applique quilt made with found fabrics based on a found image of Niagara Falls without water taken in 1969. Half of the electricity used to sew this quilt was produced in my studio with a stationary bicycle and a magnet motor. Produced with support from Provisions Library.

Samesies Island Map

Colored pencil, pen on paper
Cartographer: Jaimes Mayhew
Surveyors: Bones, Mickey Dehn, Asa Keiswetter, Jaimes Mayhew, Jack Pinder
22"x30"
This is a pregnant seahorse-shaped map of an entirely imaginary place where transmen who date other transmen live in a separatist community. While none of the collaborators have any intention of actually building this community, we designed this map as an escapist exercise in which we re-imagined a world that was built for us, by us. The features on Samesies Island reflect the specific desires of our group, and we imagine that if this map were made with a different group of Samesies, many of the features would change. We hope that this map will inspire other marginalized people to imagine utopias, and will be taking this project in that direction in 2015.

This version of Samesies Island is complete with a sky bucket for public transport, a taco stand, beaches, Coney Island, Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, a free vet, two mountain ranges, Del LaGrace Volcano, narwhals, parrot fish, Billy Tipton recording studios, a couple dozen coves named after famous trans* masculine-of-center people, and many other features.

Prints of this map can be ordered from Society 6 (either large or extra large sizes are recommended) here: http://society6.com/jaimesmayhew/samesies-island_print#1=45

The Wave of Mutilation Monument at Samesies Island Visitors Center

The Wave of Mutilation is a semi–permanent wave off of the coast of Samesies Island. The wave appeared when a group of transmen decided to set sea in search of utopia, and were carried to an area of sea trash that they constructed in the shape of a pregnant seahorse to form Samesies Island. Once believed to be the only means to arrive on Samsies Island, theWave of Mutilation is now understood to be a myth. It is notable that variations of the Samesies myth of The Wave of Mutilation exist across many gender variant communities, This monument stands as a permanentreminder of the reclamation of the very idea of mutilation, and the variety of ways that Samesies can healthily arrive in utopia.

Jaimes's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.