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Work Samples

I Am Iran I Am America

Interactive installation at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Journey from Iran to USA caused humans suffering by governmental policies from each country. Layers of hand printed fabrics symbolize American and Iranian flags and its shared colors red and white, but the only color varies in each flag is blue (USA) and Green (Iran). The emphasis is on similarities and not differences between the two countries! The 8'X8' round table fabricated which is divided unevenly invites the two countries for a face to face round table discussion.

Sacred Crossings - A Memorial Tribute

A mixed media installation - A Memorial Tribute to 215 Baha'ies martyred after 1979 Revolution in Iran.
The ceiling of the edifice in the Sacred Crossing installation which constructs of a 10' X8' X10' has 10 roses hanged to honor ten Baha'i young women who were hanged in Shiraz, Iran in 1983. The fabric to cover the ceiling has screen printed words Iran and America.

Facing The Wall - A public performance

Facing the Wall
After my art was installed at a gallery in Downtown Milwaukee, 2011, I was told to remove my work from the group exhibition due to its content. The work was entitled: A prison called Iran. In response to this censorship, I turned my painting facing the wall and did a public performance at the opening reception.

One Million Signature Campaign

Should USA wages war on Iran?
The viewer is casting (green) vote for USA not to wage war on Iran during the presidential election 2012. Also a viewer has participated in the Change+ing Room interactive installation, which allows participant wearing veil and burka to experience how it feels to wear one in public space (the gallery).

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About Fahimeh

Howard County

Fahimeh Vahdat's picture
Fahimeh Vahdat is an Iranian American Mixed Media Installation / Performance artist, Women & Children / Human Rights Activist living in greater Baltimore / DC region. She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally and has received numerous awards including 2018 Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, Rubys project award, an NEA regional grant and Puffin Foundation grant for collaborative works among others. Recently, she was Wampler Eminent Visiting Artist / Scholar at James Madison University and... more

Get Your Power Back, from " Color of Violence" series

Fahimeh Vahdat’s exhibition, Take Your Power Back, recently on view at The Rouse Gallery at Howard Community College in Columbia, MD, is a masterful and complex exploration of two opposing forces; those of the Victim and the Hero.
First, we will explore the Victim of physical violence. As described by the artist, the flesh wound goes through four stages, but changes its color eight times during the entire healing process. These colors start with the very bright red color of fresh blood, to a darker, deeper and cloudy red of the scab. As healing continues, bruises develop, having colors that range from blue, blue- purple, purple, green- blue, brownish with yellow patches, and finally yellowish. When the wound completely heals, it may have a deep amber, and whitish scar for a while, depending on the color of the skin.

Vahdat represents these colors of violence through a series of works, each created with mixed media- an amazingly complex, yet very subtly intertwined mix of collage, sewing, embroidery, pigment, charcoal, glue, lace and fabric, on hand dyed canvas. These large veiled works take time to see and more time to fully internalize. While each is very different, they are tied together by large veils of translucent red, purple, greenish, and yellow fabric. Behind the fabric we begin to see beautifully drawn figures, those that have withstood attack and abuse. One of the many things that strikes me, while looking at the work, is how perfectly the drawings of figures are combined with the fabric, and how naturally, even quietly, these troubled figures seem to exist. They remind me of ghosts. And here I must bring in the reference to Gustav Klimt because they remind me of his work- or rather, I can see the ghosts of his work in Vahdat’s. While Klimt used heavily patterned spaces and beautifully drawn female figures, Vahdat uses softer, gauzier patterning, and figures (often maternal figures and sometimes children) that appear translucent- more an integrated part of the space.

As one walks through the exhibition, towards the back of the gallery, a room has been constructed. This room is covered in fabric and rugs and feels very soft and inviting. There is a chair where the viewer can sit and a device with which you are requested to anonymously record an act of violence or abuse you have endured. Vahdat intends to use the information within these recordings for her next project. Within the room is also a very compelling image of a young vulnerable girl, standing beside a maternal, protective figure, titled My Mother and I. This adds to the feeling of safety Vahdat wants to convey in this Safe Room.
A particularly ominous aspect of this installation is that while you at first feel very safe in the room, you soon realize that the there is a large dark, shadowy figure, just outside of the door, peering in. This dark figure is part of another mixed media work, but the positioning of it, in relation to the door of the installation, has a very intimidating feeling.

In summary, Fahimeh Vahdat’s Take Your Power Back, is an exhibition full of depth, meaning, and beauty. Her works unfolds slowly in time, displaying a true level of mastery and integrity in the process. She is particularly adept at mixing materials that a less skilled artist could never pull off. That said, the content of the work takes center stage, and this content is certainly worth experiencing.
Art Review by Greg McLemore, writer & artist, Baltimore

  • Color of Violence - Installation Shot

    Color of Violence and Healing
    From the "Get Your Power Back" Color of Violence series- Gallery shot. Hand-dyed canvases 13'X72" each were treated with vegtable dys to create various colors of trauma healing. Many fabrics, laces and embroidories are a part of each piece.
  • Bondage From "Color of Violence" series

    Color of Violence -
    My comparative research continuous to be on domestic violence statistics in Iran and USA. in both countries domestic violence is high but the form of abuse varies and different in each country. Structural abuse is enforced in Iran by patriarchy power and in USA by baring gun Amendment that allows significant use of gun in domestic violence more than any other country in the world.
  • Gallery shot: Get Your Power Back

    Get Your Power Back
    Gallery shot from "Get your Power Back" exhibition. The large hand-dyed mixed media canvas, 12'X 72" X4" is entitled the Color of violence.
  • Color of Violence - Gallery Installation

    Culture of Domestic Violence
    Large Hand- dyed canvases with lace and fabric layers, drawings, collage and prints on each painting represent various form of domestic violence which is usually hidden and is covered by both the abuser and the victim.
  • Gun Violence - USA

    Domestic violence, Gun
    Gun violence is prevalence in USA especially during domestic abuse incidents which usually ends us to deadly violence against the victim. In this piece the image of a hand gun is printed on red lace against a hot pink fabric and lace to symbolize the force of gun during a domestic violence incident.
  • 5_FVahdat-Gunshot wound-.jpg

    Gun Shot - Domestic Violence
    Use of guns in domestic violence has increased drastically. In recent decades, domestic violence has been recognized as the world’s most serious social problem, crossing cultural, social, and geographical boundaries to the extent that it is found in all societies and across all social classes. It is considered one of the main health problems among women given the negative effects of domestic violence on physical, mental, and pregnancy health.

I am Iran I am America

A site specific and interactive mixed media installation at the Milwaukee Art Museum entitled: I am Iran I am America. This is the only art piece that I have ever done that symbolically deals with my journey from Iran to America, but most important part of this installation dealt with the political relationship between USA and Iran.

The 8'X8' round table is divided in two uneven halves representing my life divided between living in USA and Iran, which I lived less years in Iran than in USA, but in exile for the past 34 years. Iran is also is much smaller than USA, a super power, but with continued divide and conflict between the two countries. The top surface of each section is screen printed by the word Iran and America in Persian. The layers of fabric also are printed with the same words in the color of each country's flag. No negotiation is taking place around this divided and uneven round table and no deal has made yet.

The smaller three tired, red and blue egg tempera painting represents my feet for taking the journey, which took 556 days. It also represents the hanging practices by the government of Iran that takes place every day mostly in public places in various cities and towns in Iran.

I fled Iran after its revolution of 1979 due to persecution of Baha’is and execution of three of my relatives. Since then, I have lived in Europe and then USA in exile. As an Iranian-American artist, Women / human rights activist and educator I have worked on various capacities to share my experience with other artists and the community in which I live in.

  • I Am Iran I Am America

    Interactive installation at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Journey from Iran to USA caused humans suffering by governmental policies from each country. Layers of hand printed fabrics symbolize American and Iranian flags and its shared colors red and white, but the only color varies in each flag is blue (USA) and Green (Iran). The emphasis is on similarities and not differences between the two countries! The 8'X8' round table fabricated which is divided unevenly invites the two countries for a face to face round table discussion.
  • I am Iran I am America

    The frontal view of this site specific installation at the Milwaukee Art Museum, 2010. I used the same round table for another interactive installation entitled: Protest in 2012.
  • I am Iran I am America

    Different view near Kelly's work.
  • I am Iran I am America

    Interactive installation with the audience and the viewer.
  • I am Iran I am America

    Detail of the sheered hand printed Persian words Iran and America in the colors of each country's flag.
  • Detail: I am Iran I am America

    The 8 feet round table is unevenly severed with uneven height and printed surface with the persian word Iran and America, but sits bare in its space. This uneven design was purposefully chosen to represent two ideas: 1. The smaller part represents my former country of Iran that I have spent less time there, before fleeting to seek religious asylum in USA as is represented by the larger part of the design. 2. This is a round table for meetings, but there is no negotiation or no deal on the table with these two countries (yet)!
  • I am Iran I am America

    This three tiers egg tempera on wood and screen print on felt, is the center piece for this installation, which has two folds: one is about my journey from Iran to America and the other deals with the public executions in Iran, which are mostly by hanging.
  • I am Iran I am America

    Installation shot, Mixed media site specific installation, Milwaukee Art Museum, 2010.
  • I am Iran I am America

    I am Iran I am America
    I am Iran I am America Installation View at Milwaukee Art Museum
  • I am Iran I am America

    Installation in progress.

Sacred Crossings, A Tribute , Mixed Media Installation

This multimedia installation is a memorial tribute to the 215 people who were executed in Iran after the revolution of 1979 in Iran solely for their Baha'i faith beliefs. This piece has a center edifice that shrines the images of 10 young women who were hanged in Shiraz, Iran publicly on June 1983. One of them was my second cousin Tahireh. In this installation I have used digitized printing method using etching press on Chiri paper mounted on varnished wood for keeping them archival. Sound, Rose water, removing one's shoes entering the edifice, a persian rug in the center of it and 215 white roses across the exhibition space was intended to create a sacred space for those who lost their lives fo thier faith. My uncle Mr. Vahdat who was 80 years old was executed and his wife was given 100 slashes that made her paralized for rest of her life. The criminal state run atrocities against Baha'is in Iran has continued to this day. The UN resolution has recently called for Government of Iran change its policies toward improsionment and continous abuses agains Baha'is in Iran.

  • Sacred Crossings - A Memorial Tribute

    A mixed media installation - A Memorial Tribute to 215 Baha'ies martyred after 1979 Revolution in Iran.
    The ceiling of the edifice in the Sacred Crossing installation which constructs of a 10' X8' X10' has 10 roses hanged to honor ten Baha'i young women who were hanged in Shiraz, Iran in 1983. The fabric to cover the ceiling has screen printed words Iran and America.
  • Sacared Crossings - Inside the edifice, 10' x 8' x 10'

    Sacared Crossings - Inside the edifice, 10' x 8' x 10'
    . I tried very hard to fix this image, but the site keep showing it on its side!!! Using 215 white roses placing the against the exhibition floor/wall and 10 hanged insided the edifice for a tribute for the 10 young women hanged in Shiraz for thier faith. The edifice ceiling's nstallation shot. Had screen printed fabric used as ceiling cover.
  • Sacred Crossings, A Tribute

    Sacred Crossings, A Tribute
    This is a multimedia installation dedicated to the 215 people who were executed in Iran after the revolution of 1979 in Iran solely for their Baha'i fiath. This piece has a center edifice that shrines the 10 young women who were hanged in Shiraz, Iran publicly on June 1983. One of them was my second cousin Tahireh. In this installation I have used digitized printing method on Chiri paper mounted on varnished wood for keeping them archival.
  • Installation view

    A Tribute, Mixed Media Installation
    This is a multimedia installation dedicated to the 215 people who were executed in Iran after the revolution of 1979 in Iran solely for their Baha'i faith. This piece has a center edifice that shrines the 10 young women who were hanged in Shiraz, Iran publicly on June 1983. One of them was my second cousin Tahireh. In this installation I have used digitized printing method on Chiri paper mounted on varnished wood for keeping them archival.
  • Sacared Crossings

    A memorial dedicated to the Baha'is who were killed in Iran after 1979. The Baha'is have no civil rights under the current government. They are outlawed to practice their faith.
  • Sacred Crossings

    Installation view
  • Sacred Crossings - My Uncle- Mr. Vahdat

    Sacred Crossings -close up
    My great uncle, Mr. Yadulla Vahdat, was executed in Shiraz Iran on June 1981. His only crime was that he was a Baha'i and enttiled: father of the poor by people of Shiraz for his generosity to people. He was 80 years old.

Facing the Wall, A performance in response to my Censored work entitled: A Prison Called Iran

A performance in response to my Censored work entitled: A Prison Called Iran.
From the "Freedom" series: A Prison called Iran” is the title of my work at this exhibition; it has been turned to the wall due to its content. This mixed media ten feet tall painting on hand-dyed canvas, metaphorically, represents a contour drawing of a standing nude woman with supplicating hands in a prison cell in Iran while flower motifs on her feet symbolizes hope and freedom. This piece represents the women who are in prison cells in Iran, as prisoners of conscience, whose voices are not heard by the outside world. At the same time, my voice as an artist is also not being heard due to censorship here in Milwaukee, WI. On June 16th, when I physically turned this piece to face the wall, I was overwhelmed with emotions and felt that I literally became the woman in a prison cell in Iran who faces the walls every day without the outside world hearing her voice.

  • FaciFacing the Wall, Censored Work entitled: A Prison Called Iran, 10' X 5', Mixed Media

    Facing the Wall, Censored Work entitled: A Prison Called Iran, 10' X 5', Mixed Media
    This is my 10' X 5' censored artwork at the gallery M in Milwaukee, WI, 2011. In order not to remove my work from the exhibition and protest against the censorship in USA, I turned the piece facing the wall during the entire exhibition. The public did not get to see the artwork, but it brought many discussion about the topic. The vedio is too large to uploade on this site. Throughout the entire exhibition this work remained facing the wall and the public did not have a chance to view the actual artwork.
  • Facing the Wall

    Please watch the video to see the performance and the painting as well. In 2012 I was invited to exhibit this work in a gallery in Milwaukee with two other artists whose works were also censored many years ago in Wisconsin.
  • Facing the Wall

    Discussion among the viewers at the reception.
  • Facing the Wall

    Of course, some people could not help themselves and had to steal a look at the work even the note on the wall explained why they only seeing the back of the painting.
  • Facing the wall

    I faced the wall against my painting, which was turned facing the wall as well. I stood in the same position without moving in total silence for an hour while the reception for the exhibition was going on. I gave a short talk to the large crowd before my performance.
  • Facing the wall

    Why is it facing the wall? Is it a new thing to be censored in this country?  When does the public have the right to freedom of expression? Censorship takes place in all levels of society, but not mostly by the public. Rather, censorship takes place by those who make decisions about what kind of art should be seen or not.   I believe the public should not be deprived of the opportunity to have exchange of ideas over issues that are current and urgent, and to see works of art that can open the dialogue and lead to new awareness.
  • Facing The Wall - A public performance

    Facing the Wall
    After my art was installed at a gallery in Downtown Milwaukee, 2011, I was told to remove my work from the group exhibition due to its content. The work was entitled: A prison called Iran. In response to this censorship, I turned my painting facing the wall and did a public performance at the opening reception.

One Million Signiture Campaign: from the "Freedom" series

Living in exile in the free world, my work deals with human rights abuses, violence against women and girls and the prison systems especially in Iran and the Middle East. It is ironic as we have entered the age of maturity we still witness violation against human’s rights and lack of freedom of expression in its pandemic state around the world.

For example; in the body of work entitled: “Protest"; from my ongoing" Freedom” series, I examine the notion of protest especially since 2009 and its effect to bring positive changes around the world. And how it has changed the courses of history of nations, but also, the lives of so many people.

Since 2006 many courageous women in Iran have launched a “One Million-Signature Campaign” demanding changes to discriminatory laws against women's rights in Iran. Women in Iran and other Middle Eastern countries continue to protest to bring equal rights to the existing civil and social discriminatory laws.
In support of “One Million Signatures Campaign” since 2007, I have used the single word in Persian “Khodaya” which means “O God” to represent a signature and will continue to repeat this word over and over in my work until it adds up to one million signature as a testimonial for the support of this worthy cause.

  • From "Freedom" series, Vote: for or against USA wages War on Iran

    Should USA wages war on Iran?
    This interactive mixed media installation was set up in a way that the viewers would silently choose a ballot to cast their votes for yes (Red cards) and no (Green cards) on the question: Should USA wages war against Iran or not? This question continues through 2019! This exhibition was up during the presidential election in USA, 2012.
  • One Million Signiture Campaign: from "Freedom" series

    One Million Signiture Campaign: from "Freedom" series, 250" X 90"
    This mixed media two- sided print and painting installation is 250" X 90". The central piece has monotype printed images of women prisoners of conscience in Evin prison, Tehran, Iran who have helped with this campaign. Also the Persian word has been repeatedly written all over the work signifying signatures collected by people for this cause. Hand-dyed canvas, fabric, sweing, thread and metal
  • Detail: One Million Signituare Campaign

    The images of some of the women who have been imprisoned helping out with this campaign have been printed on the central panel. The central panel has been cut but attached only from the top to represent prison and isolation.
  • Detail: One Million Signituare Campaign

    This campaign is for collecting one million signatures in the hope of changing the discriminatory civil laws set by the government against women in Iran. The images of some of the women who have been imprisoned helping out with this campaign have been printed on the central panel. The central panel has been cut but attached only from the top to represent prison and isolation.
  • Protest, from the"Freedom; series

    In this mixed Media interactive installation, I have used the word "Oh God" repeatedly in various forms in Persian that signifies a signature for this campaign. Cast Your Vote: For or against USA wages War on Iran is a part of this installation that is visible in this image.
  • One Million Signature Campaign

    Should USA wages war on Iran?
    The viewer is casting (green) vote for USA not to wage war on Iran during the presidential election 2012. Also a viewer has participated in the Change+ing Room interactive installation, which allows participant wearing veil and burka to experience how it feels to wear one in public space (the gallery).
  • One Million Signature Campaign: from "Freedom"series

    his mixed media two- sided print and painting installation is 250" X 90". The central piece has printed images of women prisoners of conscience in Evin prison, Tehran, Iran who have helped with this campaign. Also the Persian word has been repeatedly written all over the work signifying signatures collected by people for this cause.
  • From " Freedom" Series: One Million Signiture Campgain

    One Million Signature Campaign, 250" X 90" X 5", mixed media prints on Canvas
    The title of this large work is: One Million Signature Campaign.This very large piece took over two years to complete. It is made out of hand-dyed canvas, layers of fabrics sewed together, Montotype printed images of activist women in Evin prison in Iran, lace, ink and several thousands of hand written Persian word: "Khodaya" which is a secular and supplicating word meaning "Oh God" in English resembling individual signature collected to support this cause.

What Will Befall Her?

“What Will Befall Her?” is a series of large scale charcoal drawings on hand made Korean paper. Each image depicts female figures often against a backdrop of symbolic imagery and text and if not space employed is flat and stark. Some texts used in these images are from contemporary Iranian political poets in Persian calligraphy. Also, the drawings are designed in the persian carpet format which represents garden of paradise which traditionally is filled with colorful flowers, but in these drawings (Persian gardens) the color has been intentionally restricted to black and white, at once symbolizing the oppression, and stripping the work its to essential imagery and content.

The flowers and patterns used in these works are chosen very carefully to symbolize various topics related to women and girls. For example; lilies represent purity, innocence and essence of life where a little girl is standing on the sea of lilies in “What Will Befal Her?”, or the Alchemical roses in the borders of “ The Dishonor of War” is an ancient female symbol of the virgin daughter within the mother which contains female creative power. In “Women Are Not For Burning” the uprooted saffron flowers which is a religious / wedding ceremonial incense represent the bride burning in India in order to collect dowry. The fire flower used on the border of this work also represents the essential gift of the Goddess's of love and the palm tree represent male force. Iris is the messenger of heaven sent to gather up the souls of women. In the border of “The Fallen” which is a 20 feet long drawing the oak tree leaves represent power.

The scale which is a primary factor puts the viewer into a one to one relationship with the images. The images confront the viewer, yet do not overwhelm, but do command attention and space. The women are nude, as the intent is to show them without the "veils" of restrictions, assumptions, and cultural roles. The nobility of women stands out in the plain, bold and simple statement of contour line drawing on paper. I exhibit the work in installation format, employing the physical space of various venues to direct the viewer’s interactions with these images. Each drawing stands on its own, yet, the dynamic created when ten or more of these images are viewed simultaneously is quite impacting.

  • What Will Befall Her?

    This exhibition was at Recoleta Art Center in Argentina with Hemispheric Institute, NYC. 2007
  • What Will Befall Her?

    Women Are Not For Burning: from the "What Will Befall Her?" series, 7' X 10', Charcoal on hand-made Korean paper.
    This work is entitled: Women Are Not for Burning is an homage to Men Are Not for Burning, but also a reference to bride burning which still is a wide spread crime in parts of India. 7'X10', Charcoal on hand-made Korean paper.
  • How many Wives? from the "What Will Befall Her?" series,

    This piece is called: How Many Wives, in reference to pleasure marriage which is legalized after the revolution of 1979 in Iran and other parts of Middle East. Alos is a direct realization to under aged marriage of girls ages 11 to 16. 7'X10'
  • Where Is Justice? From "What Will Befall Her?" Series

    Where Is Justice? From "What Will Befall Her?" Series
    Where is Justice? is the title of this 15 feet wide drawing depicting women from all backgrounds dealing with domestic violence from the "What Will Befall Her?" series, Charcoal on hand-made Korean Paper. 7' X 15'
  • What Will Befall Her?

    The Fallen, from the "What Will Befall Her?" series, Charcoal on hand-made Korean Paper. 7' X 20'
    This 20 feet by 10 feet drawing entitled: The Fallen, depict a little girl standing in front of a massive number of women who have been victim of violence against them is from the "What Will Befall Her?" series, Charcoal on hand-made Korean Paper. This work symbolically addresses the ongoing violence against women and girl around the world.
  • From "What Will Befall Her?" Series, Exhibition shot

    The Slaughter of the Innocent from " What Will Befall Her" Series, 7' 10'
    "The Slaughter of the Innocent" is a Charcoal drawing from " What Will Befall Her" Series that deals with millions of human embrios which have been aborted based on their gender. of being girls especially in China and India over many decades. The shortage of women and girls in these countries is alarming now due to those hidden criminal abortions.
  • From "What Will Befall Her?" Series

    From "What Will Befall Her?" Series
    This body of charcoal drawings deal with various violence against women and children especially young girls. Sizes varies from 7' X 5' to 7' X 2'0 Feey long on hand-made Korean paper.
  • Dishonor of War From "What Will Befall Her?" Series

    Dishonor of War
    In this shot there are two works on display. "The Dishonor of War" is from the "What Will Befall Her?" series which depicts a solder aiming at innocents women and children during war especially US Iraq war. 7' X 10' .Charcoal on hand-made Korean paper. The second one is called: What Will Befall Her? to the left which is the title work for this series; "What will Befall Her?" 7' X 5', Charcoal on hand-made Korean Paper.
  • Soldiers Are Coming

    Soldiers Are Coming
    Soldiers Are Coming, from "What Will Befall Her?" Series 7'X10', charcoal on hand-made Korean paper.

Exile and Protest from the "Freedom" series

The interest in the complexity of cultural identity, a sense of belonging to a particular place, a place in society, or a place called “home”… The childhood memories, the language and poetry of the motherland… The pull of the past and the force of the future is like a thread interwoven in the fabric of my work where, as an Iranian-American artist, I choose to advocate for human / women’s & children's rights and freedom of expression. Exile as a form of a forced human condition on displaced individuals has been misunderstood and misused in many ways, especially in contemporary settings. Growing up in Tehran in a Baha’i household with parents of Zoroastrian and Muslim backgrounds in a neighborhood where Armenians, Turks and Jews were living peacefully together, I learned early on that each human being has a story of survival to tell. I also learned that most of ethnic and religious minorities initially chose Iran as their sanctuary, but were persecuted in some form or another as the power structures shifted and changed. Much intolerance and persecution continues in the aftermath of the 1979 Revolution.

  • Exile: from Freedom series

    Mixed media print, drawing on hand-dyed canvas and fabric, sewing, lace. 2014
  • Exile: from Freedom series

    Exile
    Mixed Media Print and hand-dyed canvas and fabric, lace and sewing. 2014, ongoing. This piece was an inspiration for my new and ongoing acid attacks series.
  • Exile Freedom seires

    I was a very young woman leaving Iran and finally to settle down in America. The Exile series examines the most intimate experiences of human beings including my own that becomes universal on its core.
  • Exile: Freedom series

    The map of Iran, my former country, is printed on this hand-dyed canvas, but sheer fabrics covers the piece with colors of American flag representing my adopted country.
  • Where is my Vote? Protest: from "Freedom" series

    Where is my Vote? Protest: from "Freedom" series
    Images of protesters from around the world has been printed on this hand-dyed canvas and veiled with fabric and embroidery. 2012- ongoing
  • Protest: from Freedom series

    Mixed media drawing and print on paper, 50"X50", 2012-13
  • Where is my Women's Rights? Protest: from "Freedom" series

    Protest: Where is my Women's Rights?
    Where is my Women Rights? This is a tribute work to Homa who was a doctor educated in USA, but whent back to Iran in 1995, but could not tolorate the contnious abuse of women in public especially the compulsory veil. She put herself on fire in protest. Print and drawing on Paper.
  • Protest: from Freedom series

    Mixed media painting on canvas, 52"X50"
  • Protest: from "Freedom"series

    Mixed Media Print and Drawing on BFK paper, 50"X50"
    Protest from "Freedom" Series,Mixed Media Print and Drawing on BFK paper, 50"X50"
  • Protest: from Freedom series

    Gun violence, Domestic violence
    Get Your Power Back has started since 2017 and is ongoing. The prevalence of domestic violence has risen dramatically during the Covid-19 pandemic since intimate partners are forced to stay at home with their children and pets when public shelters are shut down”. Mixed Media.

Evin and Kahrizak Prison Series

In Iran, a country where the right to freedom, liberty and equality are violated daily; in a country where just in one month (February 21-March 21st) human rights defenders documented more than 13,000 incidents of violation of human rights of women, workers, ethnic minorities, religious minorities, students etc.; in a country that has the highest death penalty per capita and the second highest number of executions after China; in a country that is demanding the eradication of laws protecting women and girls because they are considered a threat to national security. In Iran the prisoners of conscious are still fighting for freedom for all and give their lives for it... After the green movement in Iran, many people who disputed the election were arrested, tortured, raped and killed. The Kahrizak prison personnel in Norther Teheran committed the most atrocities against people of Iran. The Eevin Prison is also notorious for its inhumane treatment of its prisoners.

  • Stop Executions in Iran

    This is a multidisciplinary installation with video, the map of Iran is directly painted on the wall with an image of prison placed on Tehran the capital of Iran where Kahrizak and Evin prisons are located. It also includes two other installations dealing with the aftermath of the uprising in 2009 and the prison system in Iran. 2010
  • From the" Freedom" Series: Kahrizak prison

    The kahrizak prison has witnessed atrocities no other place in Iran has witnessed during the aftermath of 2009 uprising in Iran. Finally the authorities admitted to those brutal rapes and killings of young men and women that the government had to shot down the prison in 2010.
  • From the "Freedom" Series: Stone

    Stop Stoning in Iran. This piece has actually shown a kneeling woman, bloody, but the three layers of sheer fabrics veils her body. Actual stones are placed in front of the piece on the floor of the gallery as an installation reminding people that the stones has to be the right size for this vicious crime to take place. The entire canvas is filled with flowers and leaves drawn by charcoal. Mixed media print and charcoal on hand-dyed canvas, lace and stone
  • Protest: Female Ward in Evin prison, From the Freedom Series

    Protest: Femal Ward in Evin prison, From the Freedom Series
    This piece is a symbolic entrance to the notorious Evin Prison women ward. plastic pink sandals, acrylic and charcoal on linen, 130"X90", 2012
  • Installation view from "Freedom" series: Rope

    Iran is the last executioner of children. An etching of the hanged 14 years old girl is covered by a veil over the large portrait of her. Iran is the last executioner of children. An etching of the hanged 14 years old girl is covered by a veil over the large portrait of her. Please zoom in to see the etching on fabric sown on hand-dyed canvas. Please zoom in to see the etching on fabric sown on hand-dyed canvas.
  • Mixed media Installation: Stars, Circles and Women

    Stars, Circles and Women
    An installation view of the exhibition entitled: Stars, Circles and Women dealing with refugee crises in Syria that affected over 15 million people in 2016.