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Work Samples

MPT Urban portrait Staples.jpg

Portrait of the homeless.  Woven scrap copper. Portrait executed with staples, oxidation achieved with muriatic acid.
Portrait of the homeless. Woven scrap copper. Portrait executed with staples, oxidation achieved with muriatic acid.

Hill Door .jpg

Scrap copper and recycled steel sculpture mounted on an entry door. 108" h x 39"w. Part of the complete rebuild of a classic mid-century modern Atomic Rancher designed to meet present day LEED standards. Geothermal heating and cooling, combined with passi
Scrap copper and recycled steel sculpture mounted on an entry door. 108" h x 39"w. Part of the complete rebuild of a classic mid-century modern Atomic Rancher designed to meet present day LEED standards. Geothermal heating and cooling, combined with passive solar heat, low VOC finishes, green and/or recycled materials .... all new art had to meet the same standards as the new heating/cool, materials and finishes.

Blue Basket Skyline.jpg

Plaited recycled copper basket with bronze edge.
Plaited recycled copper basket with bronze edge.

pipe 1

3 blocks from the White House, I saw a man wrapped in cardboard, plastic bags and bits of cloth. Just awakening, he stretched his arms upward after what had to be a rough nights sleep. I quickly recorded the moment on the back of a manilla folder and move
3 blocks from the White House, I saw a man wrapped in cardboard, plastic bags and bits of cloth. Just awakening, he stretched his arms upward after what had to be a rough nights sleep. I recorded the moment on the back of an envelope and moved on. Later, I stumbled across some PVC pipe and flashing in the discard pile of a building site. The man, the pipe and the flashing merged. copper , pvc 19" x 30"x 7"

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About David Paul

David Paul Bacharach (b.1949) was born in Baltimore, Maryland. At an early age he was taught watercolor painting and sewing by his grandfather, how to work metal and wood from his father and picked up a passion for weaving from his mother. He studied at Case Western Reserve University, receiving his B.A. in Biochemistry in 1971 and received advanced training in physiology in 1974 from the University of Maryland. David is totally self-taught as an artist. While still in high school he began exhibiting... more

cans, tea bowls and chimneys

“cans, tea bowls and chimneys” is a series revealing ways in which the landscape has been altered by the careless jetsam of modern life.
In 1970 I moved away from welding and began plaiting metal allowing me to develop a tension between detail and form that had alluded me with welding. I chose copper to work with because of its pliability, availability and the colors I could obtain with copper that could not be produced employing other metals. Working with simple hand tools I plaited the copper, often plein air, reproducing the actual visual conditions seen at the point where I encountered my subjects, contrasting with my studio metal work that tended to create a predetermined look.

  • Blue

    woven copper form, chemical patina
    woven copper form, chemical patina
  • blue II

    blue II...copper, bronze, plaited, chemical patina 15.5" x 12" x 12.5"
  • Tea Bowl

    tea bowl 6" X 6.25" X 6.25"
  • weber-chimney

    Our local woods are being smothered by invading flora. Chinese bittersweet, wild grape, stilt grass, purple loosestrife, Japanese honey suckle and more, form sculptural forms of impenetrable material surrounding and eventually destroying everything.
    Our local woods are being smothered by invading flora. Chinese bittersweet, wild grape, stilt grass, purple loosestrife, Japanese honey suckle and more, form sculptural forms of impenetrable material surrounding and eventually destroying anything they encircle. I continually clear these invasive from our property. While cleaning out a small wood lot I saw what I thought was a natural form that looked like a miniaturized brick kiln with its huge chimney stack, imposing itself on the surrounding woodland.
  • can

    While traveling, I am constantly amazed how many people feel it is appropriate to toss anything from fast food wrappers to mattresses on the sides of the roads and in our woodlands. Often I gather the waste and dump it in the next available trash can but
    While traveling, I am constantly amazed how many people feel it is appropriate to toss anything from fast food wrappers to mattresses on the sides of the roads and in our woodlands. Often I gather the waste and dump it in the next available trash can but normally this material presents only disgust not inspiration. But, on occasion a rusty piece of steel will catch my attention. A Trader Joe's soup can with its bulging midsection and copious layers of rust intermingled with an interesting graphic was one such object.
  • ama bowl X

    tea bowl.....woven copper slittings, heat patina
    ama bowl X.....woven copper slitting, heat patina 24" X 28" X 28"
  • soccer-chimney, gourd IV

     soccer-chimney In a near-by woodland I found a perfectly round, ball of honey suckle and multiflora rose in full flower.  I realized this wasn't a natural form but it was so fragrant I cut the vines, bringing the honeysuckle and roses back to the studio.
    soccer-chimney I found a perfectly round, ball of honey suckle and multiflora rose in full flower. It's fragrance was captivating. I cut the vines, bringing the honeysuckle and roses back to the studio. For days the flowers perfumed the studio but eventually, the flowers faded and the leaves wilted. I could then see the greenery had concealed a heavily scarred, deflated soccer ball. hieroglyph: matted vine/ order emerging from chaos copper, 2012 14" X 10.5" X 10.5
  • enfield

    enfield, plaited copper form, chemical patina
    enfield, plaited copper form, chemical patina
  • fiddlehead

    fiddlehead fern...oak log carved into basic form and sheathed in discarded roofing copper, chemical patina
    fiddlehead...oak log carved into basic form and sheathed in discarded roofing copper, chemical patina
  • telephone wire sheathing

    disgarded telephone wire sheathing
    discarded telephone wire sheathing found in the local woods steel substructure, sheathing woven into steel employing a traditional Japanese basketry technique hieroglyph: waste, disregard for the environment

quilts

In the early 1990s I created 14 works reflecting a distinctly American art form the classic one patch patterned scrap quilt.
Quilting is a collage technique. Memories of home, family, community are preserved from worn bits and pieces gathered over time that relate personal stories as ideograms of memory and pattern holding meaning for the maker.
How I originally employed the quilt technique is still very much the way I use it now, and though look and scale are quite superficially different, their original identity is intact.



  • Circle 2

    "Circle II"...a quilt of woven scrap copper. 9 patches quilted with steel
    "Circle II"...a quilt of woven scrap copper. 9 patches quilted with steel
  • carpet

    carpet....three woven copper scrap, patches each 36" x36" stacked and quilted with copper wire. Heat patination.
    carpet....three woven copper, scrap, patches each 36" x36" stacked and quilted with copper wire. Heat patination.
  • workshop-scrap-quilt

    workshop-scrap-quilt made from the studio jetsam:gloves, tires, embroidery backing,scrap copper, scrap carpet, discarded house paint, barbed truss plates, quilted with wire
    workshop-scrap-quilt made from the studio jetsam: well worn work gloves layered with latex, woven retread tire, ( black); embroidery backing (blue); copper scrap originally destine for recycling, woven and colored with heat; worn 1", sand paper belts, woven and colored with house paint from the local dump; scrap carpeting colored with additional dump house paint; barbed truss plates recovered at a demo site. 40 squares quilted together with steel wire 108"w x 84"h x3"d
  • Blue Shingle

    Copper Quilt employing a riff on the giordes (rya) knot. Although I refer to this technique as a knot, it actually produces a pile on the surface of the metal. The quilt is created entirely of scrap copper recovered from a construction site.
    Copper Quilt employing a riff on the giordes (rya) knot. Although I refer to this technique as a knot, it actually produces a pile on the surface of the metal. The quilt is created entirely of scrap copper recovered from a construction site.
  • Circle I

    One of my first quilts: woven copper and woven steel patinated with heat and chemicals. quilted together with steel and copper wire  copper, steel 48" x48" x2"
    One of my first quilts: woven copper and woven steel patinated with heat and chemicals. quilted together with steel and copper wire copper, steel 48" x48" x2"
  • pink quilt

    pink quilt: copper roof material, truss plates, fabric, cardboard, and assorted lagan recovered from a building site.  46 patches quilted with copper wire and staples
    pink quilt: copper roof material, truss plates, fabric, cardboard, and assorted lagan recovered from a building site. 46 patches quilted with copper wire and staples 48"x48"
  • Chicago

    Chicago: dumpster diving at the building site finding aluminum and stainless steel scrap.  A very cold January day. 12 aluminum and stainless steel patches, ground, woven and plaited. quilted with stainless steel strip
    Chicago: dumpster diving at the building site finding aluminum and stainless steel scrap. A very cold January day, I looked to my left and saw grey lake and sky merged. To my right was a silver, glass and steel building piercing the grey above. 12 aluminum and stainless steel patches, ground, woven and plaited. quilted with stainless steel strip 72" x 54" x 3"
  • Yellow Sentinels, following 9/11

    following 9/11.  Five panels of woven: scrap copper and steel, abrasive belts, tire retread, cardboard and table mats.  all material was burned, treated with chemicals and some panels were coated with lime and clay.
    Yellow Sentinels, following 9/11. Five panels of woven: scrap copper and steel, abrasive belts, tire retread, cardboard and table mats. All material was burned, treated with chemicals and some panels were coated with lime and clay.
  • Ushak Shingle

    Copper Quilt employing a riff on the giordes (rya) knot. Although I refer to this technique as a knot, it actually produces a pile on the surface of the metal. The quilt is created entirely of scrap copper recovered from a construction site.
    Copper Quilt employing a riff on the giordes (rya) knot. Although I refer to this technique as a knot, it actually produces a pile on the surface of the metal. The quilt is created entirely of scrap copper recovered from a construction site.
  • News Quilt

    Collage of news papers, wood and ink all gather during walks around Baltimore.
    Sleeping on grates under the cover of newspaper and cardboard. Collage of newspaper, plywood and ink all gather during walks around Baltimore.

a lens in the landscape

When out of the studio I take time to ramble, recording what I see with sketches, photographs and gathered curiosities.
Generally, I focus on a communities quiet corners, commercial/industrial buildings, industrial residue and eccentric individuals.
Recording from my perspective, impressions and occasionally self-portraits the sub-conscious with specific locations,
A distinct narrative develops that enables analysis and synthesis that taps into the sub-conscious. Most often this narrative reveals it self while I am sketching what I believe to be an objective perspective. In reality, my perspective is subjective, a metaphor.

Employing this personal, theoretical framework .... A visual language, as the resolution to an image for which exists no traditional solution, eventually reveals itself.
.

  • urban portrait

    Walking in Philadelphia I saw a man resting awkwardly in a lawn chair. no pencil or paper available I use duct tape and a scrap of plywood to capture the moment. I  preserved the memory of the resting man on woven copper, using 10,000 rusted staples.
    Walking in Philadelphia I saw a man resting awkwardly in a lawn chair. No pencil or paper available I use duct tape and a scrap of plywood to capture the moment. I preserved the memory of the resting man on woven copper, using 10,000 rusted staples. 24"x 24" x2"
  • pipe II

    Washington , D.C.  plaited copper  18" x15"
    Washington, D.C. plaited copper 18" x15"
  • Ark

    How do you create a modern Ark of the Covenant?
    Project: Create a modern Ark of the Covenant. A modern equivalent of the golden chest described in Exodus, for a new synagogue. The Ark was a vessel or box, covered in gold with a cherubim on either end. It was said to contain the source of consciousness through which all is created. To create an Ark for a new synagogue was to investigate the nature of evolving reality and creation and manifest that mercurial reality as a three dimensional statement that would remain forever unchanged.
  • pipe 1

    3 blocks from the White House, I saw a man wrapped in cardboard, plastic bags and bits of cloth. Just awakening, he stretched his arms upward after what had to be a rough nights sleep. I quickly recorded the moment on the back of a manilla folder and move
    3 blocks from the White House, I saw a man wrapped in cardboard, plastic bags and bits of cloth. Just awakening, he stretched his arms upward after what had to be a rough nights sleep. I recorded the moment on the back of an envelope and moved on. Later, I stumbled across some PVC pipe and flashing in the discard pile of a building site. The man, the pipe and the flashing merged. copper , pvc 19" x 30"x 7"
  • Callow Avenue-Baltimore

    I grew up at 2200 Callow Ave, Baltimore, several blocks below the now bull dozed wasteland of old Whitelock Street. Walking round the old neighborhood I sketched, remembered, accumulated and discarded; mosaic tile, rusted bits of metal, an old pair of pli
    I grew up at 2200 Callow Ave, Baltimore, several blocks from the bull dozed wasteland of old Whitelock Street. Walking the old neighborhood I sketched, remembered, accumulated and discarded; tile, rusted bits of metal, an old pair of pliers, wire, memories and family. 67"h x 24"w x 5"d
  • collected offerings

    children retrieving balls from the outlet drain of a sewer using a crab net, dropping each orb into a basket.  the balls looked to be in desperate shape but obviously useful treasures to the children.  back in the studio.....orb and container.  corroded e
    Children retrieving balls from the outlet of a sewer, using a crab net, they dropped each precious orb into a basket. The balls looked to be in desperate shape but obviously were treasures to the children. Back in the studio.....copper orbs and a container. Corroded eggs resting in their nest. A comment on todays disposable people and culture. 36" x 36" x 10"

collage


I begin working, with at best a vague impulse, the result of living with my accumulated sketches, photographs and collected discarded materials. But, when I pick up my torch and hammers, I had provided no method for myself to proceed directly from initial impulse, to hammer and metal, to a completed work.
I found I did not think abstractly with my torch and hammers. What I thought about when working with the metal were principally the issues associated with the craft of metalsmithing, which was a problem.
The act of turning sheet metal into a sculpture transformed the material, allowing the material to speak with a voice of its own but, the final work was unrecognizable when compared to my original vision.
To resolve the issue of converting hammer blows into an actuality that was not directed by technique I found I needed an informative mid-step. An active work-platform that allowed me to coalesce ideas, creating for myself a visual substructure for the work.
Collage, to my mind more useful than other available techniques because it could more easily be made to serve a purpose.
My original paintings and charcoal sketches, metal silhouettes, scraps of paper, oxidized metal, card and fabric, leaves and woodland litter and other additive elements are layered, cut, considered and reconsidered.
I then photograph the cumulative artwork which comprises a retrospective overview of my approach to image creation including painting, fabric collage and sculptural elements.
Finally computer software is employed to enlarge, shrink, crop, blur, contrast and intensify colors, obscure/eliminate details, create repetition, and flatten the depth of field. The result is a mach-cut that disrupts spatial or temporal continuity, shatters preconceived notions, and questions what the image is communicating.

  • spotted owl

    oil painting of spotted owl from sketches at raptor recuse center
    oil painting of spotted owl from sketches at raptor recuse center
  • ravens black and white

    collage of 2 original paintings, wood burning, steel silohouettes, leaf litter and dirt
    collage of 2 original paintings, wood burning, steel silohouettes, leaf litter and dirt
  • Great Grey Owl

    Great Grey Owl. Colored pencil, watercolors, charcoal. 16x20
    Drawing of Great Grey Owl. Colored pencil, watercolors, charcoal on board. 16x20
  • a parliment of owls

    computer manipulated original painting
    computer manipulated original painting
  • Blue-Black Spotted Owl

    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane by collaging multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane by collaging multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
  • Black/Grey Polyptych 5

    Encaustic/giclee polyptych employing multiple giclees to compose the final 5 part image.   Individual giclees employed in the final polyptych is the print from a photograph of an original acrylic painting.
    Encaustic/giclee polyptych employing multiple giclees to compose the final 5 part image. Individual giclees employed in the final polyptych is the print from a photograph of an original acrylic painting.
  • Spotted Owls Polyptych 4

    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
  • Black Shovel

    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
  • Great Horned-Bullseye Polyptych 5

    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
  • Great Pink Grid

    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.
    Giclee/encaustic investigating interruption of the pictorial plane through the collaging of multiple giclees, hand torn and composed to create a final image.

a parliment of Owls.... a conspiracy of Ravens

It is all subjective, defined by one’s sense of intensity…
For years, I walked through woodlands, photographing/gathering; leaves, stones, pieces of bark or moss. I observed form and color, was aware of the graceful calligraphy of birds in flight, but rarely noticed the insects, small mammals and individual plants, the substructure of the woodland that created a kind of hieroglyphic sign language whose meaning of was overpowered by grander forms and colors.
In this series of works I developed a language that registers these individual components, but which at the same time is as specified as an ideogram.
This is of course subjective, but it is so real to me that it feels "real".

  • Raven-the orator...close-up

    Raven-the orator: ideogram: woodland eyes/beak, dense leaf pattern copper, stainless steel 29" x 40" x 10"
    close-up Raven-the orator. ideogram: woodland eyes/beak, dense leaf pattern ideogram: woodland eyes/beak, dense leaf pattern copper, stainless steel 29" x 40" x 10"
  • Raven-the Orator

     Raven-the Orator ideogram: woodland eyes/beak, dense leaf pattern 29"x 40" x 15"
    Raven-the Orator...full frontal view ideogram: woodland eyes/beak, dense leaf pattern, tangled invasive vines 29"x 40" x 15"
  • praying mantis...close-up

    One of the first works completed as part of this project was a 96" high sculpture of a praying mantis poised patiently on a steel rod of grass. I chose the praying mantis because of it's architectural body and the inherent symbolic meaning attributed to t
    One of the first works completed as part of this project was a 96" high sculpture of a praying mantis poised patiently on a steel rod of grass. I chose the praying mantis because of it's architectural body and the inherent symbolic meaning attributed to the insect. Appearing calm, patient, even meditative this contradicts the insects aggressive, indiscriminately omnivorous reality. copper, bronze steel 2012 96"H x 75"w
  • Raven-the Statesman....full view

    Raven-the Statesman, each bird in the series is different, capturing a different aspect of the birds essence.  ideogram: woodland beak, dense leaf pattern, tangled of invasive vines, detritus of man copper, bronze 45"L x 43"H x 15"W
    Raven-the Statesman, each bird in the series is different, capturing a different aspect of the birds essence. ideogram: woodland beak, dense leaf pattern, tangled of invasive vines, detritus of man copper, bronze 45"L x 43"H x 15"W
  • Raven-in thought

    Raven-in thought The ravens intelligence and curiosity is a constant wonder to observe. ideogram: woodland beak/eyes/claws-danger, dense leaf pattern, tangled invasive vines copper, bronze  36"L x 15"H x 13"W
    Raven-in-thought The ravens intelligence and curiosity is a constant wonder. ideogram: woodland beak/eyes/claws-danger, dense leaf pattern, tangled invasive vines copper, bronze 36"L x 15"H x 13"W
  • Raven....close-up of leaf litter, matted undergrowth

     Raven-close-up. ideogram; matted undergrowth/leaf litter copper
    Raven....close-up of leaf litter, matted undergrowth ideogram; undergrowth/leaf litter copper
  • wood thrush-nest-shovel...close-up

     wood thrush.... a nest with eggs... leaves balanced on a ne72" long steel branch rotates 360 degrees.... bobbs up and down... supported by a stylized shovel. ideogram: transparent qualities of woodland birds and animals, individual leaf, domed-shaped
    wood thrush..close-up.... a nest with eggs... leaves balanced on a 72" long steel branch rotates 360 degrees.... bobs up and down... supported by a stylized shovel. ideogram: transparent qualities of woodland birds and animals, individual leaf, domed-shaped nest (the result of species transitioning to nesting off the ground, where the risk from predators is greater), detritus of man steel, copper, bronze. 72" wide x 84" high
  • wood thrush-nest-shovel....full view

    ideogram: transparent qualities of woodland birds and animals, individual leaf, domed-shaped nest
    Full view, wood thrush.... a nest with eggs... leaves balanced on a 72" long steel branch rotates 360 degrees.... bobs up and down... supported by a stylized shovel. ideogram: transparent qualities of woodland birds and animals, individual leaf, domed-shaped nest (the result of species transitioning to nesting off the ground, where the risk from predators is greater), detritus of man steel, copper, bronze. 72" wide x 84" high
  • Balzac, Spotted Owl....close-up

    great horned owl ideogram: secretive, concealed, covert qualities of woodland birds and mammals, tangled/knotty nature of the woods stainless steel, copper, bronze. 72" wide x 84" high
    great horned owl ideogram: secretive, concealed, covert qualities of woodland birds and mammals, tangled/knotty nature of the woods stainless steel, copper, bronze. 72" wide x 84" high
  • Balzac, Spotted Owl...full view

    Balzac, great horned owl. ideogram: secretive, concealed, covert qualities of woodland birds and mammals, danger, tangled/knotty nature of the woods stainless steel, copper, bronze.
    Balzac, Great Horned Owl...full view ideogram: secretive, concealed, covert qualities of woodland birds and mammals, danger, tangled/knotty nature of the woods stainless steel, copper, bronze. 15" x15" x 40"

CRAFTSPEOPLE: in their own words. A chronicle of the American crafts movement from 1950s to the present.

​​​
In 2014 a small group of craft artists gathered in Chicago to discuss the future of the American studio craft movement. During those conversations several attendees lamented the fact that no history of the movement or the community they felt so much a part of had been written .
Additionally it was noted that any first hand history of the movements beginnings had to be gathered soon because many of the original craftspeople were World war II vets and/or Black Mountain School graduates and as such were no longer working or in some cases had died.
These artists, defined by creativity, ingenuity and self reliance were in many cases self taught in the field of craft they chose to explor. Many earned their livings not by teaching or writing but by creating work in their studios and transporting that work to events around the country to sell.
Additionally, it was noted that the Craftsman's Emergency Relief Fund (CERF+), a non-profit founded and funded by these same studio craft artists that was established to provide direct financial assistance and emergency relief as well as educational oppurtunities to craftspeople was in dire need of funds as a result of the recession of 2009.
Valerie Hector a bead artist, and myself decided to develope a project that would serve both to chronicle the studio craft movement from the late 50's until today and provide CERF with it's much needed funds.
The result was a book, "Craftspeople in Their Own Words" that brought together stories written or related by the craftspeople themselves describing their lives in the studio, on the road, or at various craft events from the 1960s to the present. The book was to offer an intimate look at the experiences and philosophies of these highly creative professional artists working in all craft media.
Michael Monroe, curator of the Renwick Gallery of American Craft and Director of the American Crafts Council immediately agreed to contributed the Preface.
All profits from the sale of the book were to benefit the Craft Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) and we were started.
Seemed simple enough. I had never written a book but was competent with computer design programs. Valerie was a good writer and editor and craftspeople in general are always ready with a stpory or two.

  • original jacket design for the book

    The 85 stories contained in Craftspeople in Their Own Words range from practical to philosophical; from comical to dramatic; and from deeply personal to purely factual. Whatever the theme, these stories inspire, recounting career challenges, family crises
    My original book jacket for CRAFTSPEOPLE: in their own words. 30 months ago Valerie hector ( noted bead artist), and myself began developing a project to chronicle the American Crafts movement from the 1960s until today combining the project with a fund raising effort to support the, "Craftsman's Emergency Relief Fund".
  • The introduction to "Craftspeople in their own words"

    I have been participating in craft/art events since 1963. Often while at an exhibition someone will ask, "in all the years you have been working what is your all time favorite show". Usually my answer is that my favorite show is the one I am presently at, but that's a lie. My all time favorite is the first national juried event I ever participated in when I was 16, in Stowe, Vermont.
    PDF icon The introduction to "Craftspeople in their own words"
  • Collage hands Baker .jpg

    Makers hands tell a thousand stories, a collage Craft (noun) something produced skillfully by hand Craftsmanship (noun) the skill involved in making something beautiful or practical using your hands Craftsperson (noun) someone who creates beautiful of pra
    Makers hands tell a thousand stories, a collage Craft (noun) something produced skillfully by hand Craftsmanship (noun) the skill involved in making something beautiful or practical using your hands Craftsperson (noun) someone who creates beautiful of practical objects using their hands Handcrafts (noun) objects created by people using their hands or an activity in which people created objects using their hands
  • How to Cook and Ox

    1966. Sixteen and flying solo. Steering Mom’s olive-green Galaxy to my first craft event away from home. Black Mountain trained craftspeople explaining the “essence of the essential”. Exploring, probing, unknown foods, unknown drugs all demanding investigation. What could be better!
    PDF icon How to Cook and Ox
  • Setting up the exhibit, a collage

    Each exhibit’s set up is the same, Yet different. Unload the vehicle, Crap packed under the seats, on the roof, between your legs. Lights, flotsam, action, The calm before the storm.
    Each exhibit’s set up is the same, Yet different. Unload the vehicle, Crap packed under the seats, on the roof, between your legs. Lights, flotsam, action, The calm before the storm.
  • Paula's Pilaf

    Sipping bitter coffee, I gingerly removed the steaming hot, white toast and fried egg from the neatly folded wax paper cradle. Taking a tentative bite, I tasted the perfect mix of salt, grease and cholesterol.
    PDF icon Paula's Pilaf
  • Studios, a collage.

    Studios. Personal, private preserves Promoting creativity and reflection.
    Studios. Personal, private preserves Promoting creativity and reflection.
  • Mike and Maureen Banner, "The Long and Winding Road"

    It had been a wonderfully exhilarating ride and it isn't over yet!
    PDF icon Mike and Maureen Banner, "The Long and Winding Road"
  • Craftspeople working, a collage.

    Hands, eyes, backs, arms, Bent, intent, skilled,  Speaking with a voice all their own.
    Hands, eyes, backs, arms, Bent, intent, skilled, Speaking with a voice all their own.
  • They're going to drop drugs

    Woodstock was also a craft show?
    PDF icon They're going to drop drugs

myth and arthropoda

“What blocks a creative solution to a problem is often an overly narrow and single minded concentration from a single frame of reference. The person who can combine frames of reference and draw connections between ostensibly unrelated points of view is likely to be the one who makes the creative breakthrough. " Denise Shekerjian, Uncommon Genius
In 2014, fiber artist and Professor Emerita, Art Department, University of Hawaii, Pat Hickman and I set out to challenge ourselves. Pat suggested a collaboration. We spoke for several days about how the collaboration could proceed.
Pat had previously collaborated for eleven years with fiber artist Lillian Elliot. I had never collaborated with anyone.
Our collaboration was going to be one of a fiber artist working with delicate animal membranes and a metal artist welding steel and copper. The fact that those two materials might not mutually coexist presented potential problems but, creative solutions to those very problems was part of the appeal.
We both agreed we wanted a means to expand our personal artistic visions but we felt we needed plan. To that end we decided I would work on my own in Baltimore. I would then deliver the metal frames to Pat who would work independently in her Hudson Valley studio. Every 4 to 6 months we would come together for several days to talk, study and complete a few of the pieces we both felt had “potential”.
My metal work often begins life based on a realistic observation of the natural world but, in the end it is about something more abstract, it concerns what we value, what is important. The work never addresses the natural world in a purely literal way.
Pat’s animal membrane coverings don’t represent anything specific, but when you see them you feel that they are “real”. These paradoxes are what the collaboration is about. When the metal and the fiber interact, we feel they, lead you to a new way of seeing, not possible without our interaction.
Since beginning our collaboration in the fall of 2014 our collaborative work has been exhibited in three gallery exhibitions, featured on the cover of the “Textile Society of America," biennial report, fall 2015 and included in an exhibition at the New Bedford Museum of Art.








  • reef

     massed ridge of forms, each one 5" to 12" in diameter, arranged as rock, coral and sand just below the seas surface
    a massed ridge of forms arranged as rock, coral and sand just below the seas surface steel, copper, animal membranne 48" X 132" X 15"
  • charybdis

    A black Charybdis whirlpool swirls, consumes; surrounded by the Scylla. Choosing between two evils Animal fiber stained with ink is enclosed within a steel armature  layered with unaltered animal fiber.
    A black Charybdis whirlpool swirls, consumes; surrounded by the Scylla. Choosing between two evils Animal fiber stained with ink is enclosed within a steel armature layered with unaltered animal fiber.
  • primeval

    form of the earliest of ages; steel, copper, animal membrane
    form of the earliest of ages steel copper animal membrane 11" x 17" X 12"
  • harvest

     transporting goods in ancient baskets, henna tattooed trays. Red oxide, steel, animal membrane, copper, bamboo, waxed linen. 25"  x 33"  x14"
    Traders, traveling together transporting goods in ancient baskets, henna tattooed trays. Red oxide, steel, animal membrane, copper, bamboo, waxed linen. 25" x 33" x14"
  • wounded

    what remains after the armies retreat?  Steel, copper, animal membrane, pierced.
    what remains after the armies retreat? Steel, copper, animal membrane, pierced. 30" h x 18"w
  • molt

    shedding the old shell to make way for new growth; steel, animal membrane, iron oxide
    shedding the old shell to make way for new growth steel, animal membrane, iron oxide 5" X 10" X 6" and 18" X 14" X 15"
  • hatch

    Door to other worlds. Thank you Mr. Carroll Steel, animal membrane. 10" x 11" x13"
    Door to other worlds. Thank you Mr. Carroll Steel, animal membrane. 10" x 11" x13"
  • luminaria

    luminaria steel, animal membrane; pierced, burnt, stretched, tatooed 17" X 23" X 21"
    glowing with an internal light exposing structure and flaws steel, animal membrane; pierced, burnt, stretched, tatooed 17" X 23" X 21"
  • excarnation

    Bleaching and bloating as excarnation progresses, flesh still encases bone. animal membrane, steel 11"  x 17"  x 12"
    Bleaching and bloating as excarnation progresses, flesh still encases bone. animal membrane, steel 11" x 17" x 12"

making visible the invisible....the Leopold wall project

In 2009, an international symposium of craftspeople working with metal was held at Peters Valley Craft Center in Layton, New Jersey. Artists from Spain, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Portugal, Scotland and the United States were invited to gather and create work addressing the artist’s relationship to the world around us.
I was asked to present a talk and create with the assistance of the other symposium participants a large, permanent, outdoor sculptural installation. Choosing to speak of Aldo Leopold and design my installation in response to his 1949 book, “A Sand County Almanac," which was influential to my thinking regarding environmental issues.
I envisioned an installation of three hand woven, recycled-scrap copper walls. Weaving each wall on site with the assistance of the other participants each wall would be 120'’ high x 168'’ long x 14" deep. My intent was to demonstrate what Leopold referred to as “land ethic”, a visible reminder of the relationship between people and nature. Copper is a reactive metal. I intended that color changes on the coppers surface, the result of the metals interaction with local pollutants, would provide a visual demonstration of Leopold's "land ethic" philosophy. The more dramatic the color change the greater the degree of pollution.
Leopold wrote, "One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds. Much of the damage inflicted on land is quite invisible to laymen. An ecologist must either harden his shell and make believe that the consequences of science are none of his business, or he must be the doctor who sees the unchanged dimensional marks of death in a community that believes itself well and does not want to be told otherwise.” My intent was to make the invisible pollution, visible.
Leopold also wrote that, “A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise,”. Peter's Valley had been plagued for decades by constant, ruinous flooding of its' buildings and property. By careful positioning of each wall on the crest of a centrally located dell, the walls could divert rain water, decrease the flooding and create a new rain garden in the dells' basin again making the invisible, visible.

  • Spring 2009 Wall

    "Peter's Valley, Leopold Project Wall". Installed at Peters Valley Center during an International Symposium in 2009. Symposium participants, who assisted with the weaving and installation of the walls, pose in front of the completed sculpture.
  • Fall 2009 Wall

    "Aldo Leopold Wall Project", fall 2009. Patchy darkening and noted iridescent dichroic, (interference colors), at ground level.
    "Aldo Leopold Wall Project", fall 2009. Patchy darkening and noted iridescent dichroic, (interference colors), at ground level. Interference colors faded after several weeks as they are composed of free radicals and therefore only loosely adherent. The wall's deeper colors persisted indicating probable sulfidedeposits on the surface. . Possible causes; acid rain, pollution of the surrounding soil, sulphur in the air and anaerobic environment of nearby marshy areas.
  • Fall 2010

    One year after installation the wall is showing thick, adherent oxidation that would normally take 3 years to develop.
    One year after installation the wall is showing thick, adherent oxidation that would normally take 3 years to develop.
  • Spring 2010

     Acidic residue of rain water remains on a reactive surface.
    Walls exhibit, overall deep adherent patination. Although the acidity of rain in the eastern US is generally high, rain by itself is not sufficient to corrode copper in this manner. This reaction occurs when the acidic residue of rain water remains on a reactive surface; dissolved by dew and other conditions that don't sufficiently dilute the acids or there is a persistent generation of sulfides in the atmosphere causing rapid patination. .
  • Spring 2011

    Significant verdigris observed. Probable cause acid rain and/or sulphur dioxide, (common air pollutant) converting to sulfuric acid.
    Significant verdigris observed. Probable cause acid rain and/or sulphur dioxide, (common air pollutant) converting to sulfuric acid.
  • Winter 2012

    In three years the walls show changes normally seen on the seacoast or a heavily industriallized area after 5-7 years. A visible reminder of Leopold's "land ethic" philosophy
    In three years the walls show changes normally seen on the seacoast or a heavily industriallized area after 5-7 years. A visible reminder of Leopold's "land ethic" philosophy

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