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About Anthony

Anthony Stellaccio's picture
Anthony Stellaccio was raised in the suburbs of Baltimore and earned his BFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art. As an avid traveler and artist who frequently works abroad, Baltimore has been the city to which he has returned for more than 25 years. A member of the American Ceramic Circle and the International Academy of Ceramics, Anthony is a trans-Atlantic Baltimore artist.

Handle for the Axe

Artist Statement
HANDLE FOR THE AXE

In my artwork, I have always dealt with tensions, harmonies, and metaphorical dichotomies that I express through visual and processual contrasts. Thus, alterations between different forms of casting and mark making, the relationship between the organic and the inorganic, and rhythmic, shifts between modulation and improvisation have always been at the core of my vocabulary as a ceramic artist.

However, as I no longer limit myself to the use of a single material, contrasts and dualities have found new dimension in my recent work. Particularly, combinations of ceramics and Formica have allowed for greater disparity in process and starker visual contrasts than I was able to achieve working solely with clay. Becoming a multi-media artist has also granted a greater perspective on the nature and use of materials, not merely as a means of achieving a visual result, but as distinct elements with an intrinsic value that shape the content of sculpture.

Working with two materials that imply domesticity, domestication, domestic spaces, and domestic articles, I have looked to these most familiar environments and icons as a source of inspiration for form and surface. The result of late has been work that is as much part of a broad commentary as it is personal reflection on the macro and micro – the private and social - environments in which I live. Honest reflection into these spaces of my life has resulted in work that aims to be both critical and nostalgic – a seemingly irreconcilable paradox that breeds strangeness and duplicity.

  • Domestic Article #2 (Irons)

    48’’x 42’’ x 15.5’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • Domestic Article #2 (Irons)

    48’’x 42’’ x 15.5’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • Domestic Article #1 (Dogs)

    41.5’’x 49’’ x 8.5’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • 6/7

    41’’x 9 x 21 Wood, porcelain, Formica 2010
  • 3/3

    53’’ x 28’’ x 20’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • 4/3

    28’’ x 48’’ x 24’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • XXX

    36’’ x 36’’ x 12’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • 2/4

    30’’x 42’’ x 14’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • Inversion

    30’’ x 48’’ x 11’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010
  • Forte (My Mother’s Piano)

    18’’ x 40’’ x 22’’ Porcelain, wood, Formica 2010

How It's Done (Handle for the Axe)

Artist Statement

HANDLE FOR THE AXE

In my artwork, I have always dealt with tensions, harmonies, and metaphorical dichotomies that I express through visual and processual contrasts. Thus, alterations between different forms of casting and mark making, the relationship between the organic and the inorganic, and rhythmic, shifts between modulation and improvisation have always been at the core of my vocabulary as a ceramic artist.



However, as I no longer limit myself to the use of a single material, contrasts and dualities have found new dimension in my recent work. Particularly, combinations of ceramics and Formica have allowed for greater disparity in process and starker visual contrasts than I was able to achieve working solely with clay. Becoming a multi-media artist has also granted a greater perspective on the nature and use of materials, not merely as a means of achieving a visual result, but as distinct elements with an intrinsic value that shape the content of sculpture.



Working with two materials that imply domesticity, domestication, domestic spaces, and domestic articles, I have looked to these most familiar environments and icons as a source of inspiration for form and surface. The result of late has been work that is as much part of a broad commentary as it is personal reflection on the macro and micro – the private and social - environments in which I live. Honest reflection into these spaces of my life has resulted in work that aims to be both critical and nostalgic – a seemingly irreconcilable paradox that breeds strangeness and duplicity.

Drifter

Artist Statement
DRIFTER

I must, to begin, accept that I will never know conventional happiness. I am a person haunted by the dark specters of loss. I persist through this, in part, by exaggerating my relationship with loss in my artistic process. And so the objects I create begin at sites of memory and of mourning - a cemetery, the home of a loved one, or a historical site to which I can connect emotionally. I collect earth and objects from these spaces, sometimes leaving what I can in their place and sometimes incorporating the sacrifice of irreplaceable objects into my work. With each ritual of creation I hope to fill and lighten the weighted void overhanging my everyday life, and in this sense my work is strictly functional. I am less interested in art than I am in confrontation and catharsis.

  • Drifter (Home)

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 9’’ x 7’’ x 16’’ each
  • Drifter (Home) detail

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 9’’ x 7’’ x 16’’ each
  • Drifter (Rest)

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 8.5’’ x 25’’ x 15’’ each
  • Drifter (Rest) detail

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 8.5’’ x 25’’ x 15’’ each
  • Drifter (Rest) detail

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 8.5’’ x 25’’ x 15’’ each
  • Drifter (Bust)

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 18’’ x 11’’ x 11’’ each
  • Drifter (Bust) detail

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 18’’ x 11’’ x 11’’ each
  • Drifter (Bust) detail

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 18’’ x 11’’ x 11’’ each
  • Reliquary Vessel

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 3'' x 18'' x 10''
  • Reliquary Vessel (image 2)

    Earth from the grave of the artist’s father (fired), earth from the home of the artist’s mother (fired), earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from two New Orleans’ cemeteries (fired), clay (unfired talc, ball clay, and frit 3124), sodium silicate HWD 3'' x 18'' x 10''

How It's Done (Drifter)

I must, to begin, accept that I will never know conventional happiness. I am a person haunted by the dark specters of loss. I persist through this, in part, by exaggerating my relationship with loss in my artistic process. And so the objects I create begin at sites of memory and of mourning - a cemetery, the home of a loved one, or a historical site to which I can connect emotionally. I collect earth and objects from these spaces, sometimes leaving what I can in their place and sometimes incorporating the sacrifice of irreplaceable objects into my work. With each ritual of creation I hope to fill and lighten the weighted void overhanging my everyday life, and in this sense my work is strictly functional. I am less interested in art than I am in confrontation and catharsis.

Drink From the River (Bocio)

Artist Statement
DRINK FROM THE RIVER (Bocio)

During more than two years of work at the National Museum of African Art in Washington DC, I became acquainted with a body of work known as bocio. Bocio, which are primarily figurative, are the signature art form of the Vodun religion that is practiced in Benin. Vodun is the antecedent of the Voodoo religion brought from Africa, via the Caribbean, to New Orleans, where my current body of artwork, heavily influenced bybocio, was made.

As distant relatives, the makers of bociodivined the composition of their assemblages from an inherited, culture- and community-based lexicon, while I divine the composition of my sculptures from a personal narrative and more broadly understood symbols and icons. Where bocioconfront chaos and negative external forces with an unnerving aesthetic potency, my visual language is that of a white, Western, academically trained fine artist working in the present day. Moreover, what I confront is my own past, the symptoms of loss, and a chaos that is mostly internal. Yet, in both bodies of work, material is metaphor, objects are personalized, feelings trespass upon the intellect, and visual presence is the arrow tip that drives the pursuit of catharsis - a confrontation, embrace, and ultimate defeat of the negative.

  • Isolation

    Clay, lead glaze, cement, correspondences (ash and fragments), human teeth, blood from the artist HWD 17.5” x 14.5” x 9.5 ''
  • Isolation

    Clay, lead glaze, cement, correspondences (ash and fragments), human teeth, blood from the artist HWD 17.5” x 14.5” x 9.5 ''
  • Isolation

    Clay, lead glaze, cement, correspondences (ash and fragments), human teeth, blood from the artist HWD 17.5” x 14.5” x 9.5 ''
  • To Give and To Take

    Clay, lead glaze, cement, Historical Introduction to Philosophy by Albert Hakim (ash), axe, goat’s heart (ash) HWD 40’’ x 17.5’’ 13’’
  • To Give and To Take

    Clay, lead glaze, cement, Historical Introduction to Philosophy by Albert Hakim (ash), axe, goat’s heart (ash) HWD 40’’ x 17.5’’ 13’’
  • Take You With Me

    Clay, cement, approximately 200 padlocks, keys, photographs, correspondences, photographs, mementos HWD 15’’ x 12.5’’ x 5.5’’
  • Tributary

    Clay, cement, sand from Africa, Louisiana sugar, earth from Congo Square, lead shot from the siege of Port Hudson, LA (1863) HWD 19’’ x 13’’ x 13’’
  • Failure

    Clay, fritted underglaze, sugar HWD 4.5’’ x 21’’ x 21’’
  • Memento Mori (To Live and to Fake)

    Clay, lead glaze, earth from the town of the artist’s birth, earth from Lithuania, skull, ink, text (originally written by the artist’s father to the artist’s grandparents), rope HWD 21’’ x 22’’ x 7.5’’
  • Memento Mori (To Live and to Fake) detail

    Clay, lead glaze, earth from the town of the artist’s birth, earth from Lithuania, skull, ink, text (originally written by the artist’s father to the artist’s grandparents), rope HWD 21’’ x 22’’ x 7.5’’

Raw Material #1 - #5

Artist Statment
RAW MATERIAL

My artwork is tied to the confrontational aesthetic and psychic potency of West African, Vodun religious sculpture. Inevitably untethered from authenticity by whiteness, Western culture, and modernity, my works are surrogates for my own life (or death), and a form of advocacy against the neglect and marginalization of mental health in society.

The objects I create begin at sites of memory and mourning: a cemetery, the home of a loved one, or any site to which I can connect emotionally. From these spaces I collect artifacts and materials, sometimes leaving what I can in their place, and sometimes incorporating the sacrifice of irreplaceable objects into my work. This is an emotional and cathartic process of intake, exchange, and expulsion that is inextricably tied to place and mobility, found objects and containment, preservation and attachment, release, and purification.

  • Raw Material #1

    Plexiglass, ash (burned childhood toys belonging to the artist), ceramic gourds (glaze, cement, corks, mementos from the artist’s deceased relatives, foodstuffs, libations) 6.5’’x 15’’x 6.5’’
  • Raw Material #2

    6.5’’x 15’’x 6.5’’ Plexiglass, fired earth from the grave of the artist’s father, topsoil from the garden of the artist’s mother, ceramic gourds (glaze, cement, corks, mementos from the artist’s deceased relatives, foodstuffs, libations)
  • Raw Material #2 detail

    6.5’’x 15’’x 6.5’’ Plexiglass, fired earth from the grave of the artist’s father, topsoil from the garden of the artist’s mother, ceramic gourds (glaze, cement, corks, mementos from the artist’s deceased relatives, foodstuffs, libations)
  • Raw Material #3

    6.5’’x 15’’x 6.5’’ Plexiglass, red earthenware (unfired), porcelain (unfired), charred tools belonging to the artist’s father
  • Raw Material #3 detail

    6.5’’x 15’’x 6.5’’ Plexiglass, red earthenware (unfired), porcelain (unfired), charred tools belonging to the artist’s father
  • Raw Material #4

    6.5’’x 15’’x 6.5’’ Plexiglass, talcum powder, talc, bricks from the artist's home
  • Raw Material #4 detail

    6.5’’x 15’’x 6.5’’ Plexiglass, talcum powder, talc, bricks from the artist's home
  • Raw Material #5

    8'' x 24'' x 12'' Plexiglass, clay/earth, human rib bones
  • Raw Material #5 detail

    8'' x 24'' x 12'' Plexiglass, clay/earth, human rib bones

Raw Material #6 - #7

Artist Statement
RAW MATERIAL

My artwork is tied to the confrontational aesthetic and psychic potency of West African, Vodun religious sculpture. Inevitably untethered from authenticity by whiteness, Western culture, and modernity, my works are surrogates for my own life (or death), and a form of advocacy against the neglect and marginalization of mental health in society.

The objects I create begin at sites of memory and mourning: a cemetery, the home of a loved one, or any site to which I can connect emotionally. From these spaces I collect artifacts and materials, sometimes leaving what I can in their place, and sometimes incorporating the sacrifice of irreplaceable objects into my work. This is an emotional and cathartic process of intake, exchange, and expulsion that is inextricably tied to place and mobility, found objects and containment, preservation and attachment, release, and purification.

  • Raw Material #6 - #7

    Clay, glaze, glass, fragments of a horse’s jaw bone HWD 7’’ x 16’’ x 16’ (each cylinder)
  • Raw Material #6

    Clay, glaze, glass, fragments of a horse’s jaw bone HWD 7’’ x 16’’ x 16’
  • Raw Material #6

    Clay, glaze, glass, fragments of a horse’s jaw bone HWD 7’’ x 16’’ x 16’
  • Raw Material #7

    Clay, glaze, glass, fragments of a horse’s jaw bone HWD 7’’ x 16’’ x 16’
  • Raw Material #7 detail

    Clay, glaze, glass, fragments of a horse’s jaw bone HWD 7’’ x 16’’ x 16’

I AM Outside

Artist Statement
RAW MATERIAL

My artwork is tied to the confrontational aesthetic and psychic potency of West African, Vodun religious sculpture. Inevitably untethered from authenticity by whiteness, Western culture, and modernity, my works are surrogates for my own life (or death), and a form of advocacy against the neglect and marginalization of mental health in society. In particular, this body of work focuses on the transparency of coponent parts to undo the distanced relationship between public and private.

The objects I create begin at sites of memory and mourning: a cemetery, the home of a loved one, or any site to which I can connect emotionally. From these spaces I collect artifacts and materials, sometimes leaving what I can in their place, and sometimes incorporating the sacrifice of irreplaceable objects into my work. This is an emotional and cathartic process of intake, exchange, and expulsion that is inextricably tied to place and mobility, found objects and containment, preservation and attachment, release, and purification.

  • I AM Outside #1 - #2

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired), earth from the home of the artist's mother (fired) HWD 74’’ x 50’’ x 18’’
  • I AM Outside detail

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired) HWD 74’’ x 36’’ x 18’’
  • I AM Outside #2

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, earth from the home of the artist's mother (fired) HWD 30’’ x 20’’ x 18’’
  • I AM Outside #2 detail

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, earth from the home of the artist's mother (fired) HWD 30’’ x 20’’ x 18’’
  • I AM Outside #1 detail

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired) HWD 74’’ x 36’’ x 18’’
  • I AM Outside #1 detail

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, earth from the town of the artist’s birth (fired) HWD 74’’ x 36’’ x 18’’
  • I AM Outside #3

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, sheep wool and bones HWD 16’’ x 13’’ x 13’’ (each vessel)
  • I AM Outside #3 detail

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, sheep wool and bones HWD 16’’ x 13’’ x 13’’ (each vessel)
  • I AM Outside #3 detail

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, sheep wool and bones HWD 16’’ x 13’’ x 13’’ (each vessel)
  • I AM Outside #3 detail

    Clay, glaze, cement, glass, sheep wool and bones HWD 16’’ x 13’’ x 13’’ (each vessel)

Anthony's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.