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Lake2Lake Rayobello

Lake2Lake Rayobello aerial
The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.

Sew to Harvest Trail

Sew to Harvest Trail kids playing perspective
The Sew to Harvest Trail plaza mural features agriculture and cultural symbols embedded along a green “agility trail” weaving through a colorful field of fabric-like pattern representing the unity, history, diversity and culture of the adjacent community center, The Oasis. The artwork was a collaboration between Iandry Randriamandroso and Graham Coreil-Allen.

York Rd Unity Tracks

York Rd Unity Tracks art crosswalks community paint day birds-eye view
The “Unity Tracks” art crosswalks and traffic calming bump outs improve safety for street crossing pedestrians while beautifying the corridor, celebrating local culture, and strengthening community connection to the adjacent Govans Farmers Market.

Design for Distancing Curbside Commons birdseye view of midblock crosswalk

Design for Distancing Curbside Commons birdseye view of midblock crosswalk
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.

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About Graham

Baltimore City

Graham Coreil-Allen's picture
Graham Coreil-Allen (he/him) is a Baltimore-based public artist making places more inclusive and livable through public art, placemaking, and civic engagement. From artistic crosswalks and creative wayfinding to immersive sculptures and participatory urban design, Coreil-Allen infuses public space with play and intrigue. Coreil-Allen was born in Galveston, Texas, grew up in Tampa, Florida, studied at Tulane School of Architecture, completed his BA at New College of Florida, and earned his MFA from the... more

Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello

Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello

https://grahamprojects.com/projects/lake2lake-rayobello 
Project partners: National Association of City Transportation Officials, Baltimore City Department of Transportation, Bikemore, Black People Ride Bikes, Baltimore City Mayor & Council
33rd Street & Hillen Street, Baltimore, MD 21218
November 2021

The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.

  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello aerial
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Druid Hill Farmers Market Pop-Up

    Lake2Lake Druid Hill Farmers Market Pop-Up
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Play Day

    Lake2Lake Play Day
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello birds-eye view with lake
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello birds-eye view with people standing in a circle
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello perspective facing east
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello sidewalk gateway perspective with people
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello action shot of man power walking
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello birds-eye view of sunset facing southwest
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.
  • Lake2Lake Rayobello

    Lake2Lake Rayobello birds-eye view of sunset facing east
    The Lake 2 Lake: Rayobello traffic calming pavement art features bright streaks of yellow, orange, purple, and teals that enhance pedestrian safety within the bump outs, crosswalks, and sidewalks located at the entrance to Lake Montebello at 33rd Street and Hillen Road. Local residents inspired the design by sharing their cherished experiences witnessing colorful sunrises and sunsets as seen from the lake.

Design for Distancing Curbside Commons

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts. The team collaborated with the Hamilton-Lauraville Main Street and adjacent small businesses to create public spaces that meet their needs to stay open while maintaining COVID-19 precautions, including outdoor seating, distancing markers, event space, pedestrian and wheelchair accessibility, public art, signage, bicycle parking, and artful wayfinding.

Design for Distancing Curbside Commons
StreetBond 150 pavement coating, thermoplastic crosswalks and bump outs, flex-posts, water-filled barriers, shade sails, outdoor seating, umbrellas, custom benches, bike racks
15,400sf, dimensions vary
June - November 2020
4300, 4700, & 4800 blocks of Harford Rd, Baltimore, MD 21214
Project partners: Hamilton-Lauraville Main Street, Baltimore Development Corporation, Neighborhood Design Center, Baltimore City DOT, Equus Striping

  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons birdseye view of midblock crosswalk

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons birdseye view of midblock crosswalk
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons aerial view midblock crosswalk

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons aerial view midblock crosswalk
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons merchant in pedestrian space

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons merchant in pedestrian space
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons First Fridays merchant community event

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons First Fridays merchant community event
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons Annie Howe stencils detail

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons Annie Howe stencils detail
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons physical distancing bench

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons physical distancing bench
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons outdoor seating

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons outdoor seating
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons 4800 Harford Rd outdoor event space

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons 4800 Harford Rd outdoor event space
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons birdseye view 4800 Harford Rd

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons birdseye view 4800 Harford Rd
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.
  • Design for Distancing Curbside Commons perspective view with ADA curb ramp

    Design for Distancing Curbside Commons perspective view with ADA curb ramp
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Curbside Commons Design for Distancing project converted a parking lane into public space for safe, physically distanced community gathering, shopping, services, and culinary encounters along Hamilton-Lauraville’s main street, Harford Road. Led by Graham Projects, the design-build team included Property Consulting, Inc., LANNINGSMITH, and Annie Howe Paper Cuts.

Art Crosswalks for Pedestrian Safety

Public artist Graham Coreil-Allen collaborates with neighbors to improve public space through placemaking projects for pedestrian safety and play. Designed with communtiy input and created with volunteer assistance, these iconic, bright crosswalk artworks enhance safety by creating more protected pedestrian space and drawing the attention of passing motorists to the pedestrians’ safety needs and right-of-way.

Seasonal Turn

https://grahamprojects.com/projects/seasonal-turn
Project partners: Reservoir Hill Improvement Council, Maryland Institute College of Art, Maryland Department of Transportation
Whitelock Street & Brookfield Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21217
Installation team: Graham Coreil-Allen, Q Batts, Vilde Ulset, Stephanie Baker, Iandry Randriamandroso, Ellie Burg, community volunteers
April 2021

Seasonal Turn is a traffic calming intervention and street art installation enhancing pedestrian safety and representing the seasonal changes and diversity of Baltimore’s Reservoir Hill neighborhood. The artwork created three missing crosswalks within four curb extensions, or “bump outs” that slow down cars to improve pedestrian safety. Inspired by community input and selected through a public design process, its array of colors and angled lines conjure branches and roots, evoking the plant life of the adjacent Whitelock Farm and the ever growing strength of community life in Reservoir Hill.

Unity Tracks
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/unity-tracks
Project partners: Baltimore Development Corporation, York Road Partnership, Loyola University, Baltimore City DOT
York Rd & Beaumont Ave, Baltimore, MD 21212
Installation team: Graham Coreil-Allen, Q Batts, Stephanie Baker, Mar Braxton, Equus  Striping, community volunteers

May 2021

The “Unity Tracks” art crosswalks and traffic calming bump outs improve safety for street crossing pedestrians while beautifying the corridor, celebrating local culture, and strengthening community connection to the adjacent Govans Farmers Market.

Reverberations Crosswalks
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/reverberations-crosswalk-calvert/
Friends of Margaret Brent Elementary/Middle School
26th St. & St Paul St. + 26th St. & Calvert St., Baltimore, MD
June - September 2019

The Reverberations Crosswalks are pavement murals that enhance pedestrian safety for children and residents walking to and from Margaret Brent Elementary/Middle School while celebrating the school’s art education focus. Located in central Baltimore along 26th Street and St. Paul Street, and 26th Street and Calvert Street, the artistic crosswalk features large scale icons in white representing the arts, love, and beauty, surrounded by reverberating outlines on top of a base layer of angled shapes in eye-catching colors, including turquoise, orange, lime green, and salmon red. The symbols and colors that make up the design are inspired by drawings created by students during a workshop held the school in June 2018 and installed with the help of local volunteers. The icons include a crayon, music note, book, paint brush, microphone, heart, and flower.

Collington Square Oak Wisdom Crosswalks & Street Pole Banners
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/collington-square/
Collington Square Neighborhood Association, City Life Community Builders, and the Baltimore City Department of Transportation
N Chester St & E Chase St, Baltimore, MD 21213
November 2020

The Collington Square community of East Baltimore holds a 200+ year old Swamp White Oak tree as its symbol. The “Oak Wisdom” traffic calming art crosswalks and Collington Square Neighborhood Association street pole banners are inspired by looking up through those sanctuary leaves. For decades the adjacent active, elevated train tracks have served as a visual and psychological barrier between Collington Square and its neighbors closer to Johns Hopkins Hospital. The street pole banners elevate neighborhood identity by showcasing a positive symbol for the area - the beloved centuries-old tree that stands magnificently atop the hill in their local park. The art crosswalks and “bump outs” provide a welcome gateway to Collington Square while slowing down aggressive car traffic, improving street-crossing safety for its residents who rely on walking to get to school and work.

Hopscotch Crosswalk Colossus
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/hopscotch-crosswalk-colossus/
Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts
Eutaw and Lombard Streets, Baltimore, MD
December 2013

The Monumental City is played by giants among many – the business person, the bird, the worker and you. Hopscotch Crosswalk Colossus is an intersection of four oversized hopscotch-court-crosswalks, each featuring a quintessential Baltimore path-print. Featuring the shoe, the bird track, the boot and the footprint, the project is a monument to the people who populate the Bromo Tower Arts & Entertainment District and make Baltimore The Greatest City in America.

  • Whitelock Seasonal Turn

    Whitelock Seasonal Turn birds-eye view during community paint day
    Seasonal Turn is a traffic calming intervention and street art installation enhancing pedestrian safety and representing the seasonal changes and diversity of Baltimore’s Reservoir Hill neighborhood. The artwork created three missing crosswalks within four curb extensions, or “bump outs” that slow down cars to improve pedestrian safety. Inspired by community input and selected through a public design process, its array of colors and angled lines conjure branches and roots, evoking the plant life of the adjacent Whitelock Farm and the ever growing strength of community life in Reservoir Hill.
  • Whitelock Seasonal Turn

    Whitelock Seasonal Turn birds-eye view with Whitelock Farm event
    Seasonal Turn is a traffic calming intervention and street art installation enhancing pedestrian safety and representing the seasonal changes and diversity of Baltimore’s Reservoir Hill neighborhood. The artwork created three missing crosswalks within four curb extensions, or “bump outs” that slow down cars to improve pedestrian safety. Inspired by community input and selected through a public design process, its array of colors and angled lines conjure branches and roots, evoking the plant life of the adjacent Whitelock Farm and the ever growing strength of community life in Reservoir Hill.
  • York Rd Unity Tracks

    York Rd Unity Tracks art crosswalks community paint day birds-eye view
    The “Unity Tracks” art crosswalks and traffic calming bump outs improve safety for street crossing pedestrians while beautifying the corridor, celebrating local culture, and strengthening community connection to the adjacent Govans Farmers Market.
  • York Rd Unity Tracks

    York Rd Unity Tracks art crosswalks aerial view
    The “Unity Tracks” art crosswalks and traffic calming bump outs improve safety for street crossing pedestrians while beautifying the corridor, celebrating local culture, and strengthening community connection to the adjacent Govans Farmers Market.
  • Reverberations Crosswalks - aerial

    Reverberations Crosswalks - aerial
    The Reverberations Crosswalks are an intersection mural that enhances pedestrian safety for children and residents walking to and from Margaret Brent Elementary/Middle School while celebrating the school’s art education focus. September 2019, Federally-specified traffic paint, crosswalk, concrete bumpouts, 26th St. & Calvert St., Baltimore, MD, Friends of Margaret Brent, Live Baltimore, Margaret Brent Elementary/Middle School, the Harwood Community Association, the Charles Village Civic Association, and Baltimore City Department of Transportation.
  • Reverberations Crosswalk 26th Calvert - students crossing

     Reverberations Crosswalk 26th Calvert - students crossing
    The Reverberations Crosswalks are an intersection mural that enhances pedestrian safety for children and residents walking to and from Margaret Brent Elementary/Middle School while celebrating the school’s art education focus. September 2019, Federally-specified traffic paint, crosswalk, concrete bumpouts, 26th St. & Calvert St., Baltimore, MD, Friends of Margaret Brent, Live Baltimore, Margaret Brent Elementary/Middle School, the Harwood Community Association, the Charles Village Civic Association, and Baltimore City Department of Transportation.
  • Collington Square Oak Wisdom Crosswalks

    Collington Square Oak Wisdom Crosswalks aerial view
    The “Oak Wisdom” traffic calming art crosswalks and Collington Square Neighborhood Association street pole banners are inspired by a 200+ year old Swamp White Oak tree that the community holds as its symbol. The street pole banners elevate neighborhood identity while the art crosswalks and “bump outs” slow down cars for pedestrians safety and provide a welcome gateway to the Collington Square community.
  • Collington Square Oak Wisdom Crosswalks

    Collington Square Oak Wisdom Crosswalks perspective view with Hoen Lithograph building
    The “Oak Wisdom” traffic calming art crosswalks and Collington Square Neighborhood Association street pole banners are inspired by a 200+ year old Swamp White Oak tree that the community holds as its symbol. The street pole banners elevate neighborhood identity while the art crosswalks and “bump outs” slow down cars for pedestrians safety and provide a welcome gateway to the Collington Square community.
  • Hopscotch Crosswalks Colossus

    Hopscotch Crosswalks seen from above
    The Monumental City is played by giants among many – the business person, the bird, the worker and you. Hopscotch Crosswalk Colossus is an intersection of four oversized hopscotch-court-crosswalks, each featuring a quintessential Baltimore path-print. Featuring the shoe, the bird track, the boot and the footprint, the project is a monument to the people who populate the Bromo Tower Arts & Entertainment District and make Baltimore The Greatest City in America.

Creative Wayfinding & Alley Activations

Sew to Harvest Trail
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/sew-to-harvest-trail
A collaboration of Graham Coreil-Allen and Iandry Randriamandroso
Project partners: Bible Center Church, The Oasis Project, Studio Volcy, Siplast
717 North Homewood Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15208
April 2021

The Sew to Harvest Trail plaza mural features agriculture and cultural symbols embedded along a green “agility trail” weaving through a colorful field of fabric-like pattern representing the unity, history, diversity and culture of the adjacent community center, The Oasis. The artwork was a collaboration between Iandry Randriamandroso and Graham Coreil-Allen.

Bromo Wayfinding
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/bromo-wayfinding 
Project partners: Bromo Arts District, Baltimore National Heritage Area
Bromo Arts District, Baltimore, MD 21201
September 2021

The Bromo Wayfinding project connects pedestrians with the Bromo Arts District’s cultural spaces and historic sites via colorful thermoplastic sidewalk markers. Designed with input from local stakeholders, the over one-mile long walking path includes eighteen pennant-like markers celebrating local sites and Bromo Arts District logo markers connected by smaller diamond shaped “bread crumb” pieces.

Towanda LaneScape Grantley Ave
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/towanda-lanescape-grantley 
Project partners: Towanda Neighborhood Association, Baltimore City Department of Planning, Baltimore City Department of Transportation, Healthy Neighborhoods, Plantation Park Heights Urban Farm
E Wabash Ave & Grantley Ave, Baltimore, MD 21215
October 2021

The Towanda LaneScape project connects Towanda residents with a community green space and the Cold Spring Station Metro Subway via pedestrian-safety-enhancing and beautifying public art. With inspiration and installation help from local legacy residents Graham Projects and the Towanda Neighborhood Association co-created a curving wayfinding “Purple Path”, up-cycled tire planters, and murals of local medicinal plants.

Pimlico Wayfinding
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/pimlico-wayfinding 
A collaboration of  Graham Coreil-Allen and Whitney Frazier
Project partners: Baltimore City Department of Planning, Pimlico Elementary Middle School, Cylburn Arboretum, Park Heights Renaissance, Cylburn Community Association, Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks
Oakley Avenue corridor, Baltimore, MD 21215
January 2021

The Pimlico Wayfinding art path connects Pimlico Elementary Middle School students and residents of the surrounding Park Heights neighborhood with CC Jackson Recreation Center to the west and Cylburn Arboretum to the east via colorful sidewalk butterfly stencils, thermoplastic flower markers, and prismatic butterfly street signs. The artwork was created in collaboration with community artist Whitney Frazier and is based on input from neighborhood residents and inspired by local flora and pollinators.

  • Sew to Harvest Trail

    Sew to Harvest Trail aerial view
    The Sew to Harvest Trail plaza mural features agriculture and cultural symbols embedded along a green “agility trail” weaving through a colorful field of fabric-like pattern representing the unity, history, diversity and culture of the adjacent community center, The Oasis. The artwork was a collaboration between Iandry Randriamandroso and Graham Coreil-Allen.
  • Sew to Harvest Trail

    Sew to Harvest Trail kids playing perspective
    The Sew to Harvest Trail plaza mural features agriculture and cultural symbols embedded along a green “agility trail” weaving through a colorful field of fabric-like pattern representing the unity, history, diversity and culture of the adjacent community center, The Oasis. The artwork was a collaboration between Iandry Randriamandroso and Graham Coreil-Allen.
  • Sew to Harvest Trail

    Sew to Harvest Trail kids playing birds-eye view
    The Sew to Harvest Trail plaza mural features agriculture and cultural symbols embedded along a green “agility trail” weaving through a colorful field of fabric-like pattern representing the unity, history, diversity and culture of the adjacent community center, The Oasis. The artwork was a collaboration between Iandry Randriamandroso and Graham Coreil-Allen.
  • Bromo Wayfinding

    Bromo Wayfinding Abell Building historic garment factory marker
    The Bromo Wayfinding project connects pedestrians with the Bromo Arts District’s cultural spaces and historic sites via colorful thermoplastic sidewalk markers. Designed with input from local stakeholders, the over one-mile long walking path includes eighteen pennant-like markers celebrating local sites and Bromo Arts District logo markers connected by smaller diamond shaped “bread crumb” pieces.
  • Bromo Wayfinding

    Bromo Wayfinding Current Space marker perspective
    The Bromo Wayfinding project connects pedestrians with the Bromo Arts District’s cultural spaces and historic sites via colorful thermoplastic sidewalk markers. Designed with input from local stakeholders, the over one-mile long walking path includes eighteen pennant-like markers celebrating local sites and Bromo Arts District logo markers connected by smaller diamond shaped “bread crumb” pieces.
  • Bromo Wayfinding

    Bromo Wayfinding birds-eye view of Bromo Arts District marker with pedestrians
    The Bromo Wayfinding project connects pedestrians with the Bromo Arts District’s cultural spaces and historic sites via colorful thermoplastic sidewalk markers. Designed with input from local stakeholders, the over one-mile long walking path includes eighteen pennant-like markers celebrating local sites and Bromo Arts District logo markers connected by smaller diamond shaped “bread crumb” pieces.
  • Towanda LaneScape Grantley Ave

    Towanda LaneScape Grantley Ave install birds-eye view
    The Towanda LaneScape project connects Towanda residents with a community green space and the Cold Spring Station Metro Subway via pedestrian-safety-enhancing and beautifying public art. With inspiration and installation help from local legacy residents Graham Projects and the Towanda Neighborhood Association co-created a curving wayfinding “Purple Path”, up-cycled tire planters, and murals of local medicinal plants.
  • Towanda LaneScape Grantley Ave

    Towanda LaneScape Grantley Ave barrier, planters, street art perspective
    The Towanda LaneScape project connects Towanda residents with a community green space and the Cold Spring Station Metro Subway via pedestrian-safety-enhancing and beautifying public art. With inspiration and installation help from local legacy residents Graham Projects and the Towanda Neighborhood Association co-created a curving wayfinding “Purple Path”, up-cycled tire planters, and murals of local medicinal plants.
  • Towanda LaneScape Grantley Ave

    Towanda LaneScape Grantley Ave recycled tires hanging planters fence mural
    The Towanda LaneScape project connects Towanda residents with a community green space and the Cold Spring Station Metro Subway via pedestrian-safety-enhancing and beautifying public art. With inspiration and installation help from local legacy residents Graham Projects and the Towanda Neighborhood Association co-created a curving wayfinding “Purple Path”, up-cycled tire planters, and murals of local medicinal plants.
  • Pimlico Wayfinding Park Heights Pathways

    Pimlico Wayfinding Park Heights Pathways birds-eye view
    The Pimlico Wayfinding art path connects Pimlico Elementary Middle School students and residents of the surrounding Park Heights neighborhood with CC Jackson Recreation Center to the west and Cylburn Arboretum to the east via colorful sidewalk butterfly stencils, thermoplastic flower markers, and prismatic butterfly street signs. The artwork was created in collaboration with community artist Whitney Frazier and is based on input from neighborhood residents and inspired by local flora and pollinators.

Sun Stomp

Premiering at the 2018 Light City Baltimore festival, Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that for eight nights activated McKeldin Square. The monumental scaffolding sculpture featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Electrical energy collected during the day and was stored as chemical energy in a battery bank which provided electricity to a colorful array of LED neon lights illuminating the structure after dark. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleacher footboards to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun sourced from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. Passersby were also invited to peer into the custom built “Power Shed” to learn about the solar technology and AV controls energizing the project. Foot-stomping powers combined, participants visually and experientially conjured the awesome and beautiful power of the sun.

Solar and Storage Statistics

  • Sun Stomp featured 527 feet of LED lighting.
  • All 16 solar panels provided 4,640 Watts per sun hour or 23,200 Watts per day in April.
  • The average home in Baltimore uses 7,546 kilowatts per year; the same amount of electricity produced by these 16 solar panels and stored by the battery bank.
  • The 16 solar panels installed on a home would save $1,052 annually in electricity charges.During Light City the Sun Stomp solar panels will prevented 200 pounds of CO2 emissions from local electricity generation.

About the Sun Stomp Collective
The Baltimore-based Sun Stomp Collective brings expertise in solar energy, interactive media, and participatory environments. Matthew Weaver has over a decade of experience in renewable energy engineering, including hydrogen and solar; and grassroots organizing around social justice and sustainability. Mark Brown is a video artist, DJ, curator, and AV expert at the Peabody Conservatory. His video work embraces the Internet as both gallery and medium, creating new works from the cracks, glitches, and fall-out of digital realities. Graham Coreil-Allen is a public artist and organizer making cities more inclusive and livable through public art, radical walking tours, and civic engagement.

Sun Stomp
http://grahamprojects.com/projects/sunstomp
April 14-21, 2018
Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD
Scaffolding, bleachers, solar panels, solar hardware, projection screen, projector, LED neon, contact microphones, video processor
34’x24’x75’
Project partner: Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts

  • Sun Stomp Light City 2018

    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp

    Sun Stomp
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - bleacher interaction

    Sun Stomp - bleacher interaction
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - LED neon matrix

    Sun Stomp - LED neon matrix
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - LED neon solar panels

    Sun Stomp - LED neon solar panels
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - solar panels daytime

    Sun Stomp - solar panels daytime
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - Power Shed

    Sun Stomp - Power Shed
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - Power Shed interior

    Sun Stomp - Power Shed interior
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - opening night crowd

    Sun Stomp - opening night crowd
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.
  • Sun Stomp - projection

    Sun Stomp - projection
    Sun Stomp was a solar powered light and interactive audio-visual environment that featured an interactive projection on one side and an array of sixteen 290 watt solar panels on the other. Participants were invited to stomp on the bleachers to trigger sun-inspired visuals and amplified sounds of the Sun. Sun Stomp April 14-21, 2018 Light City Baltimore, McKeldin Square, 101 E.

Dancing Forest & Choose Your Own Adventure

Dancing Forest
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/dancingforest/
July 21-23, 2017
Artscape
Charles Street Bridge, Baltimore, MD
Submersion printed nylon, blowers, felt, LED lights, grass, website
20’ x 45’ x 200’
Project partners: Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, Station North Tool Library

Anchoring the 2017 Artscape Charles Street Trail July 21-23, Dancing Forest was a kinetic environment of inflatable trees emblazoned with trail markers identifying Baltimore’s many classic places, features, and customs. Participants were encouraged to walk among and explore the the animated trees as they undulated in the sky. Up close, one found an array of urban trail symbols, such as benches, snowballs, bikers, and buildings. Internal LED illumination of the sculptures allowed nighttime exploration. Combining spectacular movement with urban wayfinding symbols, Dancing Forest created an exciting, playful environment inspiring participants to continue exploring Baltimore’s many intriguing places.

Choose Your Own Adventure
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/adventure-artscape/
A collaboration Graham Coreil-Allen and Becky Borlan
July 20-22, 2018
Charles Street Bridge at Penn Station, Artscape, Baltimore, MD
Beach balls, line striping paint, tent structure, LED lights, poetry
12’x40’x100’
Project partner: Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts

Choose your own Adventure transformed Baltimore’s Charles Street Bridge into a colorful playscape of pedestrian pathways and hanging beach balls. The project was commissioned by Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts for the free 2018 Artscape festival. Spray chalk lines marked a site-based map converging under a forest of beach balls hanging from an open air structure. The streetscape-enhancing project was a collaboration between Baltimore-based public artists Becky Borlan and Graham Coreil-Allen.

Choose your own Adventure took inspiration from the natural paths taken by street-crossing pedestrians, the Jones Falls and train tracks below, and the joyful experiences of summer-inspired toys. Hundreds of thousands of festival goers interacted with the kinetic environment of over four hundred colorful, translucent beach balls and a line striping street mural covering over three thousand square feet. Numerous beach balls featured hand-painted instructions offering choices for adventures beyond. Adventures included “Write a Poem in the Dirt”, “Change your name for the summer,” and “Take the first train to the end of the line.” Through tactical urbanism and creative design, the installation previewed possibilities for completely transforming the Charles Street Bridge into a playful, poetic, and pedestrian environment.

Beach ball text hand-painted by Greg Gannon of Signs of Intelligent Life

  • Dancing Forest

    Anchoring the 2017 Artscape Charles Street Trail July 21-23, Dancing Forest was a kinetic environment of inflatable trees emblazoned with trail markers identifying Baltimore’s many classic places, features, and customs. Participants were encouraged to walk among and explore the the animated trees as they undulated in the sky. Up close, one found an array of urban trail symbols, such as benches, snowballs, bikers, and buildings. Internal LED illumination of the sculptures allowed nighttime exploration.
  • Dancing Forest

    Dancing Forest
    Anchoring the 2017 Artscape Charles Street Trail July 21-23, Dancing Forest was a kinetic environment of inflatable trees emblazoned with trail markers identifying Baltimore’s many classic places, features, and customs. Participants were encouraged to walk among and explore the the animated trees as they undulated in the sky. Up close, one found an array of urban trail symbols, such as benches, snowballs, bikers, and buildings. Internal LED illumination of the sculptures allowed nighttime exploration.
  • Dancing Forest - detail

    Dancing Forest - detail
    Anchoring the 2017 Artscape Charles Street Trail July 21-23, Dancing Forest was a kinetic environment of inflatable trees emblazoned with trail markers identifying Baltimore’s many classic places, features, and customs. Participants were encouraged to walk among and explore the the animated trees as they undulated in the sky. Up close, one found an array of urban trail symbols, such as benches, snowballs, bikers, and buildings. Internal LED illumination of the sculptures allowed nighttime exploration.
  • Dancing Forest - kid tipping tree

    Dancing Forest - kid tipping tree
    Anchoring the 2017 Artscape Charles Street Trail July 21-23, Dancing Forest was a kinetic environment of inflatable trees emblazoned with trail markers identifying Baltimore’s many classic places, features, and customs. Participants were encouraged to walk among and explore the the animated trees as they undulated in the sky. Up close, one found an array of urban trail symbols, such as benches, snowballs, bikers, and buildings. Internal LED illumination of the sculptures allowed nighttime exploration.
  • Dancing Forest - night

    Dancing Forest - night
    Anchoring the 2017 Artscape Charles Street Trail July 21-23, Dancing Forest was a kinetic environment of inflatable trees emblazoned with trail markers identifying Baltimore’s many classic places, features, and customs. Participants were encouraged to walk among and explore the the animated trees as they undulated in the sky. Up close, one found an array of urban trail symbols, such as benches, snowballs, bikers, and buildings. Internal LED illumination of the sculptures allowed nighttime exploration.
  • Choose Your Own Adventure

    Made in collaboration with Becky Borlan, Choose your own Adventure transformed Baltimore’s Charles Street Bridge into a colorful playscape of pedestrian pathways and hanging beach balls. The project was commissioned by Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts for the free 2018 Artscape festival.
  • Choose Your Own Adventure

    Choose Your Own Adventure
    Made in collaboration with Becky Borlan, Choose your own Adventure transformed Baltimore’s Charles Street Bridge into a colorful playscape of pedestrian pathways and hanging beach balls. The project was commissioned by Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts for the free 2018 Artscape festival.
  • Choose Your Own Adventure

    Choose Your Own Adventure
    Made in collaboration with Becky Borlan, Choose your own Adventure transformed Baltimore’s Charles Street Bridge into a colorful playscape of pedestrian pathways and hanging beach balls. The project was commissioned by Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts for the free 2018 Artscape festival.
  • Choose Your Own Adventure

    Choose Your Own Adventure
    Made in collaboration with Becky Borlan, Choose your own Adventure transformed Baltimore’s Charles Street Bridge into a colorful playscape of pedestrian pathways and hanging beach balls. The project was commissioned by Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts for the free 2018 Artscape festival.
  • Choose Your Own Adventure

    Choose Your Own Adventure
    Made in collaboration with Becky Borlan, Choose your own Adventure transformed Baltimore’s Charles Street Bridge into a colorful playscape of pedestrian pathways and hanging beach balls. The project was commissioned by Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts for the free 2018 Artscape festival.

Arches & Access Light Art and Community Parade

Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party. On the evening of November 3rd, 2019, over three hundred residents, artists, and performers transformed Madison Avenue at Druid Park Lake Drive into a spectacular, roving block party. Neighbors collectively created a place to march, dance, and perform in celebration of our West Baltimore communities united in green space and creating safe streets for people.

Arches & Access was a Neighborhood Lights Project presented as part of the Brilliant Baltimore / Light City festival of light and literature. The event was led by Reservoir Hill artist Jessy DeSantis, Reservoir Hill advocate Courtney Bettle, and Auchentoroly Terrace public artist Graham Coreil-Allen with major support from the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council, a grant from Baltimore Heritage, and volunteers from Beth Am Synagogue’s IFO organization. The Reservoir Hill mothers Bettle and DeSantis took inspiration from DeSantis’ colorful painting of the Arches when they came up with the idea of creating a light art project in early 2019. Later the two reached out to Coreil-Allen of Graham Projects to help realize the light art. Collectively they expanded the vision to include solar powered lights leading into the park, activated by a joyful community parade showing what life could be like without highways hindering pedestrian access to Druid Hill Park.

Arches & Access Light Art and Community Parade
https://tapdruidhill.org/2019/11/20/arches-and-access/
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/arches-access 
Multicolor LED spotlights, parade, block party
Druid Hill Park Gate, Druid Hill Park, Rawlings Conservatory
November 3, 2019
Reservoir Hill Improvement Council, TAP Druid Hill, Rawling Conservatory, Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, Beth Am IFO

  • Arches & Access - Twilighters Marching Band performing on Druid Park Lake Drive

    Arches & Access - Twilighters Marching Band performing on Druid Park Lake Drive
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access - Druid Hill Park Gate light art

    Arches & Access - Druid Hill Park Gate light art
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access - Druid Hill Park Gate light art and crowd

    Arches & Access - Druid Hill Park Gate light art and crowd
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access - families crossing Druid Park Lake Drive

    Arches & Access - families crossing Druid Park Lake Drive
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access - Puppets & Crowd

    Arches & Access - Puppets & Crowd
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access - Catrin & Catrina puppets and Benevolent Bubbles bicycle group

    Arches & Access - Catrin & Catrina puppets and Benevolent Bubbles bicycle group
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access - performers at Rawlings Conservatory illuminated with light art

    Arches & Access - performers at Rawlings Conservatory illuminated with light art
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access - dance party at Rawlings Conservatory illuminated with light art

    Arches & Access - dance party at Rawlings Conservatory illuminated with light art
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.
  • Arches & Access

    Arches & Access organizers Graham Coreil-Allen, Jessy DeSantis, & Courtney Bettle
    Showcasing the cherished connections between Druid Hill Park and surrounding neighborhoods, the Arches & Access project illuminated and activated the historic Druid Hill Park Gate at Madison Avenue, Druid Hill Park, and the Rawlings Conservatory with colorful lights, a community parade, and a public party on November 3, 2019.

Participatory Mapping

Produced seperately with the City of El Paso and the Baltimore Museum of Art, Crafting the Corridor, Visioning Home Mapping, and FutureSite Baltimore were interactive mapping installations and activities in which residents wrote on and placed laser cut cardboard signs within immersive maps to illustrate and discuss their neighborhood assets, challenges, and new ideas.

Crafting the Corridor
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/crafting-the-corridor/

October 6, 2018
El Paso Museum of Art, El Paso, TX
Color vinyl banner, laser cut pop-up signs, play doh, tape, markers
10’x20’
Project partners: Planning & Inspections Department of the City of El Paso, Offices of El Paso City Council Representatives Peter Svarzbein and Cissy Lizarraga

Through the Crafting the Corridor community tour and interactive mapping workshop, El Paso residents, business owners, planners, and elected officials shared personal perspectives and identified local assets, challenges, and ideas for strengthening their neighborhoods along the city’s new streetcar routes. Locals participated in an interactive hop-on/hop-off bus tour that took them along the North and South streetcar loops. At each stop speakers shared points of interest and perspectives on current issues, local history, and opportunities for preservation and growth. Participants returned to the El Paso Museum of Art for a facilitated discussion and creative mapping session led by public artist Graham Coreil-Allen and El Paso 1st District council representative and artist Peter Svarzbein. Residents used laser cut cardboard signs, colorful tape, and play doh to write, illustrate, and sculpt their neighborhood assets, challenges, and new ideas for building on the city’s streetcar revival. They placed their handmade signs and sculptures on corresponding locations within an immersive, colorful 10’ x 20’ vinyl floor map. El Paso city planners documented participants’ numerous contributions as input for the El Paso Streetcar Corridor Plan.

BMA Visioning Home Mapping Workshop
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/bma-visioning-home-mapping/
September 23, 2017
Baltimore Museum of Art
10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218
gaff tape, laser cut cardboard, spray paint, play doh, markers
24' x 24' x 12”
Project partner: Baltimore Museum of Art

Visioning Home was a day-long workshop at the Baltimore Museum of Art that invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about Baltimore neighborhoods and envision possible futures. As part of the Imagining Home exhibit series, forty residents from across the city gathered for this meaningful day to learn about civically engaged art, find inspiration in the museum’s collection, and take part in a series of facilitated conversations and artmaking activities designed to spark creative thinking about changes and opportunities in Baltimore. El Paso artist and city councilperson Peter Svarzbein presented on how his fictitious advertising campaign to revive a defunct trolley raised $97 million in funding to re-establish strong cultural and economic bonds between El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico communities. Group discussions were captured throughout the day by visualizations drawn onto the studio's walls by graphic recorder Lucinda Levine. The day of engagement culminated in an interactive mapping installation and activity created and led by public artist Graham Coreil-Allen. Participants used laser cut cardboard signs to write and illustrate their neighborhood assets, challenges, and new ideas. They placed these signs on corresponding locations within an immersive, 22’ x 24’ floor map made of brightly colored tape. Residents highlighted and sensitively discussed a range of issues such as the school-to-prison pipeline, food deserts, and industrial pollution; and proposed new ideas such as job-creating urban farms, universal tuition, and completing Baltimore’s mass transit rail network.

FutureSite Mapping Baltimore
http://grahamprojects.com/projects/futuresite-baltimore/
The Necessity of Tomorrow(s): Mark Bradford—Making a Path
Saturday, November 11, 2017, 12pm-3:30pm
Presented by the Baltimore Museum of Art at Union Baptist Church, Baltimore, MD
Partners: The Baltimore Museum of Art, Union Baptist Church

How do you make a path to power where none exists? How do you assess a community's needs and create access for a community to self-determine?

Presented by the Baltimore Museum of Art at Union Baptist Church, FutureSite Baltimore invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about our city and envision possible futures by sharing their neighborhood assets, concerns, and ideas. This interactive mapping activity was presented as part of the The Necessity of Tomorrow(s) lecture series featuring luminary artist Mark Bradford in conversation with BMA Director Christopher Bedford. Bradford’s talk explored how the artist grapples with “making a path,” and other key questions in his artistic practice and community-based work. Afterwards, attendees were invited to contribute to the FutureSite Baltimore map by writing on laser cut signs and creating play doh sculptures representing their inspired visions for the future of Baltimore City. Contributions to the map were collected by the museum to inform forthcoming programming.

  • El Paso Crafting the Corridor participation

    El Paso Crafting the Corridor participation
    Through the Crafting the Corridor community tour and interactive mapping workshop, El Paso residents, business owners, planners, and elected officials shared personal perspectives and identified local assets, challenges, and ideas for strengthening their neighborhoods along the city’s new streetcar routes.
  • El Paso Crafting the Corridor gathering

    El Paso Crafting the Corridor gathering
    Through the Crafting the Corridor community tour and interactive mapping workshop, El Paso residents, business owners, planners, and elected officials shared personal perspectives and identified local assets, challenges, and ideas for strengthening their neighborhoods along the city’s new streetcar routes.
  • El Paso Crafting the Corridor Map

    El Paso Crafting the Corridor Map
    Through the Crafting the Corridor community tour and interactive mapping workshop, El Paso residents, business owners, planners, and elected officials shared personal perspectives and identified local assets, challenges, and ideas for strengthening their neighborhoods along the city’s new streetcar routes.
  • El Paso Crafting the Corridor signs

    El Paso Crafting the Corridor signs
    Through the Crafting the Corridor community tour and interactive mapping workshop, El Paso residents, business owners, planners, and elected officials shared personal perspectives and identified local assets, challenges, and ideas for strengthening their neighborhoods along the city’s new streetcar routes.
  • Visioning Home Mapping - after

    Visioning Home Mapping - after
    Visioning Home was a day-long workshop at the Baltimore Museum of Art that invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about Baltimore neighborhoods and envision possible futures. As part of the Imagining Home exhibit series, forty residents from across the city gathered for this meaningful day to learn about civically engaged art, find inspiration in the museum’s collection, and take part in a series of facilitated conversations and artmaking activities designed to spark creative thinking about changes and opportunities in Baltimore.
  • Visioning Home Mapping - making signs

    Visioning Home Mapping - making signs
    Visioning Home was a day-long workshop at the Baltimore Museum of Art that invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about Baltimore neighborhoods and envision possible futures. As part of the Imagining Home exhibit series, forty residents from across the city gathered for this meaningful day to learn about civically engaged art, find inspiration in the museum’s collection, and take part in a series of facilitated conversations and artmaking activities designed to spark creative thinking about changes and opportunities in Baltimore.
  • Visioning Home Mapping - participants laying tape

    Visioning Home Mapping - participants laying tape
    Visioning Home was a day-long workshop at the Baltimore Museum of Art that invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about Baltimore neighborhoods and envision possible futures. As part of the Imagining Home exhibit series, forty residents from across the city gathered for this meaningful day to learn about civically engaged art, find inspiration in the museum’s collection, and take part in a series of facilitated conversations and artmaking activities designed to spark creative thinking about changes and opportunities in Baltimore.
  • Visioning Home Mapping - group discussion

    Visioning Home Mapping - group discussion
    Visioning Home was a day-long workshop at the Baltimore Museum of Art that invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about Baltimore neighborhoods and envision possible futures. As part of the Imagining Home exhibit series, forty residents from across the city gathered for this meaningful day to learn about civically engaged art, find inspiration in the museum’s collection, and take part in a series of facilitated conversations and artmaking activities designed to spark creative thinking about changes and opportunities in Baltimore.
  • FutureSite Baltimore - youth adding sign

    FutureSite Baltimore - youth adding sign
    Presented by the Baltimore Museum of Art at Union Baptist Church, FutureSite Baltimore invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about our city and envision possible futures by sharing their neighborhood assets, concerns, and ideas. This interactive mapping activity was presented as part of the The Necessity of Tomorrow(s) lecture series featuring luminary artist Mark Bradford in conversation with BMA Director Christopher Bedford. Bradford’s talk explored how the artist grapples with “making a path,” and other key questions in his artistic practice and community-based work.
  • FutureSite Baltimore - Map with signs

    FutureSite Baltimore - Map with signs
    Presented by the Baltimore Museum of Art at Union Baptist Church, FutureSite Baltimore invited participants to challenge the entrenched narratives about our city and envision possible futures by sharing their neighborhood assets, concerns, and ideas. This interactive mapping activity was presented as part of the The Necessity of Tomorrow(s) lecture series featuring luminary artist Mark Bradford in conversation with BMA Director Christopher Bedford. Bradford’s talk explored how the artist grapples with “making a path,” and other key questions in his artistic practice and community-based work.

Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding

The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland. This demonstration project counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park. As a local resident and public artist, Graham Coreil-Allen collaborated with Bikemore, Baltimore City Department of Transportation, and neighbors on creating signage and stencils along the Big Jump pathway that make it safer for all people to enjoy the cultural and public health benefits of Druid Hill Park.

The Big Jump logo was designed by Danielle Parnes on behalf of Bikemore, with icon input from Coreil-Allen. Coreil-Allen then adapted the logo to serve as pathway signage and wayfinding. The signage features icons representing different active uses, including walking, wheelchair riding, bicycling dog walking, and skateboarding. The vinyl cut signs show motorists and passersby the uses of the Big Jump pathway. To provide wayfinding for people not in cars we also made and sprayed large scale street stencils highlighting pathway primary uses - walking, wheelchair riding, and bicycling. In addition, we stenciled colorful footprint trails that visually lead residents from surrounding blocks to safe access points for the Big Jump Baltimore pathway and Druid Hill Park.

Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding
https://grahamprojects.com/projects/big-jump-wayfinding/

August 2018
Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street, Baltimore, MD
Aerosol traffic paint, cut vinyl
Dimensions vary
Project partners: Bikemore, Baltimore City DOT

  • Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - cut vinyl branding

    Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - cut vinyl branding
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - bicyclist

    Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - bicyclist
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore father and son bicyclists, photo by Brian O'Doherty

    Big Jump Baltimore father and son bicyclists, photo by Brian O'Doherty
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore

    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - stencil

    Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - stencil
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - neighborhood direction

    Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - neighborhood direction
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - shared use stencils

    Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - shared use stencils
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - cut vinyl branding

    Big Jump Baltimore Wayfinding - cut vinyl branding
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.
  • Big Jump Baltimore Walking Tour with Graham & Ms Dee, photo by Brian O'Doherty.jpg

    Big Jump Baltimore Walking Tour with Graham & Ms Dee, photo by Brian O'Doherty.jpg
    The Big Jump is a temporary path accessible by foot, bike, and mobility devices along Druid Park Lake Drive and 28th Street in Baltimore, Maryland that counteracts decades of highway expansion that effectively cut off the surrounding working class African American neighborhoods from the park.

Graham's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.