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Work Samples

Public_Operations

Video documentation of Public Operations, an interactive, site-specific installation made for the Akimbo Dance and Movement Festival. The show took place in the Baltimore North Station Tool Library, September 2016.

Floor Marionette #2

Video documentation of the interactive sculpture, intended for operation by two people at a time. Floor Marionette #2, 2016. Wood, metal, papercrete and string. 52 x 37 x 32 inch.

Entropia

Excerpts from the full video of 8:17 min. Work in Progress. Entropia, 2016. Single channel, HD, 16:9 format.

Flood

Excerpts from the full video, of 5:27 min. 2016. Single channel, HD, 16:9 format.

Public Operations

“Public Operations” is an interactive, site specific installation which I like to think of as a large ‘architectural marionette’. It was made for the 2016 Akimbo Dance Festival, and designed for the Baltimore North Station Tool Library, a community center that offers woodworking workshops and from which members of the community can borrow tools for their own use.

The forms that comprise the piece are based on the architecture of the space. They are made of papercrete and steel and are connected to each other with handmade hinges, creating structures that rise and collapse according to their operation by the public. Some structures demand the cooperation of several visitors, and some are placed far from the handle that operates them, creating movements in unexpected parts of the space: elements around one’s body might move as a result of one’s own act, or the act of a total stranger.

In the context of a dance festival, both the architectural elements and the visitors who moved them became dancers, and the act of building and constructing- a dance. In the context of a marionette sculpture, the characteristics of concrete as a material that represents rigidity, monumentality and permanence were enhanced and challenged. Marionettes are often referred to as “the mask from which the human actor has completely withdrawn”. In “Public Operations” I attempted to pull the puppeteer back to the stage, while also returning movement to concrete and engaging the public in a silent dance in which everyone is influenced and influential.

Floor Marionette #2

Floor Marionette #2, 2016. Wood, papercrete, metal and string. 52 x 37 x 32 inch.

This video is a documentation of an interactive sculpture, intended for operation by two people at a time.
The stage upon which the piece is placed acts as a sound box, amplifying the sound created by the manipulation of the pieces.

  • Floor Marionette #2

    Video documentation of the interactive sculpture, intended for operation by two people at a time. Floor Marionette #2, 2016. Wood, metal, papercrete and string. 52 x 37 x 32 inch.

Entropia

Entropia, 2016-2017. Video and stop motion animation. HD. 16:9 format. Duration: 8:27 min.

The sculpture that appears in the videos is a clay made landscape, divided and numbered and then cast in concrete. The pieces allude to a jigsaw puzzle being solved or a reconstruction of a divided or broken land. The numbering of the pieces was inspired by the system of conservation used on buildings in Jerusalem; when renovated, their bricks are numbered with red paint so that each brick can be put back to its exact original position. These bricks, which stood in a pile and randomly placed to create a wall, acquire through their endurance of time and weather an irreplaceable role. The creatures, underground whales or slugs, seem to appear out of nowhere and constantly break the order of the land. But at the same time they seem to belong to the land more than the hands that are attempting to reconstruct it: the hands are moving stones that are inanimate, the creatures are stones that are alive, and it is thus unclear who is disturbing whose order.

  • Entropia

    Video and stop motion animation. HD. 16:9 format. Duration: 8:15 min.

Flood

Flood, 2016. Stop motion animation video. HD. 16:9 format. Duration: 5:27 min.


  • Flood

    Flood, 2016. Stop motion animation video. HD, 16:9 format. Duration: 5:27 min.

Floor Marionette #1

Floor Marionette #1, 2016. Wood, concrete and fiberglass, foam, wheels, rope and pulleys. 110 x 71 x 115 in.

This video is a documentation of an interactive sculpture, intended for operation by one person at a time. With "Floor Marionette #1" I invite the visitors to climb the stairs and take the position of a puppeteer, look down at the architectural structure and be in full control of its manipulation. In this sculpture as well as with my other interactive, marionette-like pieces, I attempt to bring back movement to seemingly still and permanent architectural structures, while questioning the role of individuals as audience, participators, activators or full manipulators of their space.

Olive Tree / Marionette

This piece was made upon invitation to the show "The Benevolent Tree" at the Umm El Fahem gallery, curated by Daniel Cahana. It was shown in 2014 and remained on permanent display at the gallery, upon the gallery's request. In Israel and Palestine, the olive tree symbolizes roots and adherence to a land. Being a popular symbol, it has turned through the years into a highly sought after decoration. As such, it is grown in commercial gardens and then uprooted and transported to foreign soils. In some severe cases, trees which are a hundred years old or more are stolen from Palestinian lands under Israeli occupation, to be sold for profit.

The sculpture is made of olive tree parts, joints that were carved out of olive tree wood, rebar, string and a ladder. The joints are fully functioning, though in this piece the audience cannot move them. The branches and stem were collected from trees that were uprooted from a garden in Jerusalem after a decision was made to redesign it; those same trees were previously removed from their original location to be replanted in this garden. The red ribbon on one of the branches is a remainder of the marking system of the trees chosen for removal. While the turning of the tree to a marionette suggests the exploitation of it as a natural resource and as a traditional symbol, the ladder is brought it to give a human scale and remind one of the absent fruits.

This work was made in collaboration with carpenter Tom Attias, 2014.

Non-Sites

Non-Sites is a group show I curated and participated in in June 2015.
Participants were Relli de Vries, Milcah Bassel and myself (Noa Heyne).
Non-Sites was exhibited in Hanina Contemporary Art gallery, Tel Aviv, a cooperative gallery I was member of in the years 2013-2016.

Excerpts from the exhibition text (written by Noa Heyne, 2015. Translated from Hebrew by Noa Heyne, 2017):

"The works in the show all deal with body and space, or with space from which the body is explicitly absent [...] with dialectics of in and out, of center and periphery.

[...]

Milcah Bassel’s installation which is made of elastic bands, stretches along the boundaries of the gallery like a drawing in space [...] The elastic bands are marked with lines - perhaps measuring units. Bassel invites the viewers to follow the bands and discover how the distance between the units changes in accordance with the journey in space and the tightness of the material. By connecting the elasticity of the bands with the firmness of the architecture, Bassel explores the flexibility of structure and space in relation to the viewers.
[...]
Like the earth and the roots that are modeled by the pot, like the bird’s nest which is built as the negative of its body (“A bird’s tool is its own body, that is, its breast, with which it presses and tightens its materials…) so does the turtle’s armor grow with the turtle’s body, to house it and fit its dimensions perfectly. The sculpture Armor is a free standing relief, based on a turtle shell but enlarged to fit - in its dimensions - a human body. In its traditional form, the relief is a flat sculpture framed according to the architecture and intended to create an illusion of three dimensionality without disrupting the continuity of the walls. In the sculpture Armor the artist attempted to do the opposite. The entire form is situated in the middle of the space in a way that creates, from certain angles, an illusion of volume, but mainly emphasizes its absence. In this way, the structure of the house becomes an illusion, not only of the external shell but of the space inside it: the large empty armor cannot contain what it was meant to protect.

The inability of a place to function as such stretches from the Clay Bird (Noa Heyne) to the bird swing that hangs from Terarium #3 (Relli de Vries); it is a swing too small and a bird too heavy, made of clay, of earth. While the swing hangs outside the box (where a stuffed animal would have been placed, in its original museum setting), and the box hangs from the ceiling, the bird is anchored to the ground. The work Parachute (Noa Heyne) is also a relief: a slice of a tree and pieces of stretched cloth that create - from certain viewpoints - an illusion of volume. The cut-out tree carries the parachute, which in a different time had the volume of an immense balloon; what enabled its volume was the weight of the person - now absent - that hanged from it and pulled it down toward the ground."
[...]
The act of demarcation inevitably contains a reminder of chaos. The making of art is the building and the breaking of the frame, an eternal return to the chaos in order to examine the components of the world around us and to define ourselves in relation to them over and over again. [...] Each work is a result of interaction and a desire to turn thoughts, physical sensations and bits of imagination into presences, into worlds that are complete but flexible in their peripheries, and capable of maintaining a dialogue with their surrounding.

  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Entrance to Gallery
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Noa Heyne. Armor. Aqua resin and fiberglass mounted on rebar and wood. 43 x 31.5 x 8 in.
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Noa Heyne. Armor [side view]. Aqua resin and fiberglass mounted on rebar and wood. 43 x 31 x 8 in.
  • IMG_6270.jpg

    Non-Sites
    Noa Heyne. Parachute. Wood, cloth, wire and metal. 78 x 28 x 6 in. At the Back: Milcah Bassel. Where Is The Line With You. Elastic bands and iron hooks. Dimensions variable.
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Noa Heyne. Clay Bird. Clay, wire and metal armature. 19 x 15 x 15 in.
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Noa Heyne. Clay Bird. Clay, wire and metal armature. 19 x 15.4 x 15.3 in.
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Relli de Vries. Terarium no.3. Mixed Media.
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Relli de Vries. Water Adhesion. Iron string, concrete, bucket and water. Dimensions variable. At the back: Milcah Bassel. Where Is The Line With You. Elastic bands and iron hooks. Dimensions variable.
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Relli de Vries. Cane. Mixed Media. 110 x 31 x 31 in.
  • Non-Sites

    Non-Sites
    Milcah Bassel. Where Is the Line With You [detail]. Elastic bands and iron hooks. Dimensions variable.

Is Time an Action

Is Time an Action, 2016. Concrete, fiberglass and rebar. 33.5 x 7.9 x 33.5 in.

  • Is Time an Action

    Is Time an Action
    Is Time an Action, 2016. Concrete, fiberglass and rebar. 33.5 x 7.9 x 33.5 inch.
  • Is Time an Action

    Is Time an Action
    Is Time an Action, 2016. Concrete, fiberglass and rebar. 33.5 x 7.9 x 33.5 inch.

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About Noa

Baltimore City

Noa Heyne is an artist working in 3D, video and animation. She was born in Ramat Gan, Israel, and is currently living in Baltimore, USA. Heyne has begun her artistic education as a painter at the Jerusalem Studio School (2005-2007) in the Master Class of Israel Hershberg, and has moved on to... more

Connect with Noa

Noa Heyne Artist: http://www.noaheyne.com


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