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About Karly Fae

Baltimore City

Karly Fae Hansen is an artist living in Baltimore Maryland. She graduated magna cum laude from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2008. Some of Karly Fae’s  art has been exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Goucher College, Load of Fun gallery, Northwest Studio, Maryland Institute College of Art, and the Radisson Hotel of Cross Keys.  Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/karlyfaehansen Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/altahaus/ Baker Portfolio: http://bakerartist.org/portfolios/... more

Deep water drawing

  • Chance Meeting

    Chance Meeting, acrylic and charcoal on paper, 2006 Karly Fae Hansen, part of the Arbuckle collection
  • The Spectacle

    Acrylic and charcoal on paper. Spring 2006. Karly Fae Hansen. A part of the Arbuckle collection
  • Impending

    42X52" Acrylic and charcoal and pastel on paper, spring 2006. Karly Fae Hansen.
  • (detail)

    Acrylic and charcoal and pastel on paper, Karly Fae Hansen.
  • Reaching

    24X42" Acrylic and charcoal and pastel on paper. Karly Fae Hansen.
  • By sea by starlight

    30X44" Acrylic and charcoal and pastel on paper. Karly Fae Hansen.
  • Grief

    72X18" Acrylic and charcoal and pastel on paper, Spring 2006. Karly Fae Hansen.

Landscape drawings

  • Drawn to the forest

    3X5ft charcoal over acrylic wash drawing, drawn from both Hudson and more recent Maryland wilderness memories.
  • It wasn't the same

    It wasn't the same 30X41" Acrylic and charcoal and pastel on paper, Karly Fae Hansen.
  • Returning (burial)

    Approx 40X50" Acrylic, charcoal, and pastel on paper. Spring 2008. Karly Fae Hansen
  • (detail)

    Acrylic and charcoal and pastel on paper, Karly Fae Hansen.
  • Red Dog Lodge

    Approx 40X50". Acrylic and charcoal on paper, Spring 2006. Karly Fae Hansen. A part of the Schreiber collection
  • barn

    Acrylic wash and charcoal on paper 28X41" Karly Fae Hansen

Something to write home about, Marlyand My Maryland

Right now, I'm working on a new line of prints with the theme "Maryland, my Maryland". For better or worse Baltimorians like to both regale in pride and deride our hometown. It is a land of many names: Merryland, Murderland, Charm City, Harm City, Smalltimore, Baltamour, Birdland, the City That Reads, The City That Bleeds, the list goes on and on... I have designed a few prints around my hometown pride and will be rolling them out as the ink dries! First up are these awesome cards designed around the MD state flag. I'm kind of gushing with pride about them. Next up will be a full scale version of the MD flag and some variations on it (particularly the home town brews Vs. a non-alcoholic rendition).

Did you know that the North American Vexillological Association (a.k.a. official flag gurus of North America) conducted a survey in 2001 of the 72 Canadian provincial, U.S. state, and U.S. territory flags; and it ranked Maryland's flag as 4th best in design quality!?

These cards are an ode to my love of Maryland’s sensibly designed flag and an undeniable love for picking and eating crabs (only Maryland blue crabs of course). I’ve carved a crab figure to emulate the red and white, "Crosslands", section of the flag. On the other side is the traditional golden yellow and black, "Calvert coat of arms" / check pattern. The end result is a reversible card, with each side equally handsome as the front or back. At first glance it looks just like the MD flag and usually only after closer inspection do most realize the true blooded passion for crabs has shone through in the Crosslands section of the flag. Kraft paper was used for the card and envelope material since it is often used at crab feasts to cover the tables before dumping a pile of steaming blue crabs covered in Old Bay seasoning on top. Man, I’m getting hungry just thinking about it!

The design for this MD themed print was conceived while sitting, with the dog, in the park next to the Washington Monument (in Baltimore) and was printed in my basement studio during the storm of Hurricane Sandy. True story, folks!

Drawing-on-Hudson

Since graduation the Hudson River, particularly life in the small town of Cornwall-on-Hudson, has proven to be my greatest source of inspiration. This is a selection of drawings drawn by my experiences along the river. I should also like to note that the River was what brought me back to drawing again after graduation when there was a year long lull in art making.

  • Pausing

    Charcoal and pastel drawing over acrylic washes. The end drawing is actually a Maryland drawing but the drawing actually began with three men setting out in the snow towards the Storm King Mt. (along the Hudson River) but as the day wore on the 3 hikers were lost in a blizzard of palms and fingers, and when the dust and snow settled all that was left was the girl and the dog in Maryland. You can still vaguely see the men in the bottom right. (30X40in) 2010
  • Moodna

    Charcoal drawing over acrylic washes. Paddling out the Moodna creek towards the Hudson River with Bailey Bones taking a passenger position . (15x20in) 2010
  • Scott

    A charcoal drawing. We were paddling out north early one evening, when the days were still long and sun shone. (20X30in) 2009
  • Campfire

    Charcoal drawing over acrylic washes. Nature's television. (20X30in) 2010
  • Nature's television

    Charcoal drawing over acrylic washes. Nature's television. (20X30in) 2011
  • Loitering (updated)

    Charcoal and pastel drawing over acrylic wash. We hiked mountains and loitered in the ends of winter. (20X30in) 2010- 2011
  • (right panel)

    A diptych of two large full sheet (30 x40in) drawings, charcoal over acrylic wash. 2010 -2011, 90% completed
  • (left panel)

    A diptych of two large full sheet (30 x40in) drawings, charcoal over acrylic wash. 2010 -2011, 90% completed
  • In the evenings

    A diptych of two large full sheet (30 x40in) drawings, charcoal over acrylic wash. 2010 -2011, 90% completed
  • Adventure Dog

    Adventure dog, 19X11"charcoal on paper. Karly Fae Hansen

Hudson Printing

Prints, stamps, and carved blocks (to be printed) inspired by the great Hudson River and life along the river.

  • Greetings from the Hudson (and If I were a Unicorn) back

    Relief printed blank greeting cards from lino cut block. Self portrait ( as a unicorn - because we all have our own legend/myth) on the Hudson (front of card) with Bailey Bones riding on the kayak ( back of card) as she does best. Used as end of the year letter and general "How you doing?" stationary. 2009
  • Happy Birthday to James

    An altered version of Greetings from the Hudson (and If I were a Unicorn). Relief print from lino cut block. 2010
  • Adventure Dog Bunting

    Karly Fae Hansen Relief print on paper with ink and merino wool yarn 2011
  • Bailey Bones Wilderness Stamps

    an example of one of the many ways the stamps are used... Karly Fae Hansen Relief print with ink drawing and paper 4X7in 2011
  • Bailey Bunting (packaged)

    Karly Fae Hansen Relief print on paper and merino wool yarn 2011
  • Charted Territories (front/right)

    A sleepy kayak ride with the dog slipping through the river and a journey through the woods towards the glittering water. Charted Territories a single color relief diptych printed card. 7X5inches. Winter 2010.
  • Charted Territories (back/left)

    A sleepy kayak ride with the dog slipping through the river and a journey through the woods towards the glittering water. Charted Territories a single color relief diptych printed card. 7X5inches. Winter 2010.
  • Charted Territories

    Slipping through the river, a sleepy kayak ride with the dog, and a journey through the woods towards the glittering water. Charted Territories a single color relief diptych printed card. My goal with this card was to have two images that the viewer could read both images together as one whole image as well as separately as two image. The backs of the cards are signed and editioned twice (once on the left and once on the right) so that if the recipient wishes they can separate it as two prints or save it one. 7X10inches. Winter 2010.

Seasons-on-Hudson, photography

"The rivers are our brothers. They quench our thirst. They carry our canoes and feed our children. So you must give to the rivers the kindness you would give any brother."
Chief Seattle - 1855

After taking a summer off in 2009 to live in the the Hudson Valley, primarily in Cornwall-on-Hudson, I embarked on a year plus long photography project documenting the seasons turning on the Hudson River returning monthly to observe the changes over the course of the year. The project was to culminate with a book to be published in 2011, however it was cancelled. A smaller book, called Proud Mary was my anthem and Thoreau my homeboy, was published in 2009 of a shorter time period of photos.

Windhorse Prayer Flags

These flags were made with blood, sweat, tears, frustrations, and very good intentions.

There were hand torn from yards of muslin and hand dyed in buckets in the basement -and may or may not have contributed to the staining of my mother's clothes dryer. Meanwhile the Windhorse was hand drawn and hand carved, and the laundered flags were ironed. Then the stamp was printed by hand on each flag. Lastly they were sewn by hand and strung. This long handmade process makes each flag unique.

The Windhorse is a symbol of an uplifting life force or energy of basic goodness or buddhanature and wakefulness. Printed on fluttering flags it carries our wishes with the speed of wind and the strength of a horse. On the back of the Windhorse are three wish fulfilling jewels of enlightenment bringing peace, wealth, and harmony. I drew the Windhorse in the style of a Dala Horse, which is a Scandinavian stylized horse usually in carved wooden toy form- a joyful symbol of some of my own Nordic roots.

These flags should be hung outside so that the wind and natural elements will spread your good thoughts, fortunes, and prayers. Ideally they are hung on a windy day, but any day is a good day as long as it done with a clear and open heart. The natural elements will eventually take their toll on the flags and this is to reminds us of the impermanence of life. You can replace them with new ones and burn the old ones or let nature run its full course.

Peace, love and learning patience!
Karly Fae

  • Windhorse Drawing

    Inspired by the flags... Windhorse Karly Fae Hansen Sumi ink and pastel drawing over top of Acrylic paint stained Rives BFK paper 29.5X16in 2011
  • Paper Windhorses

    An indoor version of the Windhorse prayer flags. 2011
  • Paper Windhorses

    Paper Windhorses Prayer Flag set is a small edition indoor variation on the fabric Windhorse prayer flags created by Karly Fae Hansen in 2010. The Windhorse symbol was designed and carved into a stamp by Karly Fae, hand printed with waterbased ink on brightly colored acid free papers, and strung on dark blue merino wool yarn. Each set contains 5 Windhorse flags each printed on one square of red, yellow, blue, green, and white paper. These paper flags are meant to swing indoors and enliven your home or office or where ever you choose to hang them. 2011
  • The Windhorse (actual carved stamp)

    The Windhorse is a symbol of an uplifting life force or energy of basic goodness or buddhanature and wakefulness. Printed on fluttering flags it carries our wishes with the speed of wind and the strength of a horse. On the back of the Windhorse are three wish fulfilling jewels of enlightenment bringing peace, wealth, and harmony. I drew the Windhorse in the style of a Dala Horse, which is a Scandinavian stylized horse usually in carved wooden toy form- a joyful symbol of some of my own Nordic roots.
  • Fall 2011 - one year later

    The flags one year later... reminding us of the impermanence of life. 2011
  • flap

    These flags should be hung outside so that the wind and natural elements will spread your good thoughts, fortunes, and prayers. Ideally they are hung on a windy day, but any day is a good day as long as it done with a clear and open heart. The natural elements will eventually take their toll on the flags and this is to reminds us of the impermanence of life. You can replace them with new ones and burn the old ones or let nature run its full course.
  • hang

    These flags should be hung outside so that the wind and natural elements will spread your good thoughts, fortunes, and prayers. Ideally they are hung on a windy day, but any day is a good day as long as it done with a clear and open heart. The natural elements will eventually take their toll on the flags and this is to reminds us of the impermanence of life. You can replace them with new ones and burn the old ones or let nature run its full course.

The last of their kind

The last of their kind, these unicorns walk among us. Everyone has their own myth that follows them. Our stories, our myths may live on but we are no less susceptible to the effects of time and age. Even stones weathers to sand.

Horses

  • Phred

    30X40" charcoal over acrylic wash on paper, Karly Fae Hansen
  • Bubbie S.

    30X40" charcoal and conte over acrylic wash on paper, Karly Fae Hansen
  • wake up

    30X40" charcoal over acrylic wash on paper, Karly Fae Hansen
  • ink sketches

    sumi ink sketches, Karly Fae Hansen
  • Horse Crazy

    Massive wall piece made of cut paper, with acrylic wash and ink and charcoal on paper. Karly Fae Hansen
  • Calliope

    Cut paper horse, acrylic on paper and assembled. Karly Fae Hansen
  • Cut paper horse

    Cut paper horse, acrylic on paper and assembled. Karly Fae Hansen
  • litho plate for Pegasus had an Icarus Moment

    litho plate for Pegasus had an Icarus Moment , Karly Fae Hansen

Graffiti Alley

I used to work for the gallery / artist space / theater Load of Fun. During my time there I became the archivist and documenter for the graffiti alley in the rear of the building. I was its cheerleader, encouraging people to come and paint while the owner of the building, Sherwin Mark, fought the good fight with the city creating a legal spot for graffiti in Baltimore. The alley's safe haven status allowed artist to come out of retirement and paint for the first time in years without the risk of jeopardizing their families and lives. It was amazing seeing the correlation between the rise in amount and quality of art in the alley and the decrease in illicit activities that used to happen in the alley. During some of the alley's low points I was driven to add my own art in an effort to spur on other artist to return to the alley's walls. The graffiti alley has garnered a fair amount of press and I would like to clarify publicly that I was its documenter for a long time and help spur things along at the very beginning BUT now the alley runs on its own feet and the graffiti artist are the ones who really make it shine and that without the enormous help and generosity of Sherwin Mark none of it would have ever happened. Thank you Sherwin.

After a few good years of tracking the alley and documenting its evolution (sometimes on a nearly daily basis) my life doesn't allow me to visit nearly as often, but I do like to pass through when I can.

Visit the Load of Fun Flickr pool: http://www.flickr.com/groups/612452@N22/
Visit Load of Fun: http://www.loadoffun.net

A few samplings of press for the alley:

City Paper Best Of Award:
http://www2.citypaper.com/bob/story.asp?id=14503

City Paper, Baltimore Aerial Festival held in the alley
http://www2.citypaper.com/arts/story.asp?id=19074

The Baltimore Sun:
http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2009-12-27/entertainment/bal-ae.alley27...

There Were Ten Tigers blog:
http://thereweretentigers.blogspot.com/2008/09/load-of-graffiti.html

Baltimore Brew:
http://www.baltimorebrew.com/2010/05/29/wild-style-reunion-tonite-a-bmor...

Connect with Karly Fae

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Karly Fae's Curated Collection

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