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About Ginevra

Baltimore City - Station North A&E District

Ginevra Shay is an artist and curator living and working in Baltimore, Maryland.  Ginevra's solo exhibition, "Sweet Broth, A Cure For Those Windows" is on view at Full Circle through Jan 5, 2019. Ginevra's photography and studio practice are in many ways inextricable from her site-specific curatorial work; they reflect one another through their investment in fostering an openness of exchange and dismantling passive engagement. Ginevra uses photography and sculpture to depict poetic moments... more

Sweet Broth, A Cure For Those Windows (Pt 1 of 2)

As Ginvera Shay completes a two month Color Darkroom Residency, Full Circle Gallery is excited to host her first solo exhibition. With a deep framework of conceptual objectives, Shay's chromogenic creations utilize experimentation, humor, and fiction to translate her personal experiences. And rather than strict adherence to conventions in color printing practices, Shay pushes her exposures in the darkroom in search of bold, duotone-like palettes.

Shay’s photography and studio practice are in many ways inextricable from her site-specific curatorial work, which reflect one another through their investment in fostering an openness of exchange and dismantling passive engagement. Photography and sculpture are employed to depict poetic moments of observation and adaptation. A 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award Recipient, Shay's recent two-person exhibition "A Big Toe Touches A Green Tomato", with Roxana Azar at Resort, was featured online in Artforum and ARTnews. And in September, Phroom released an interview with shay (read it here!) She has lectured and participated in panels at the Queens Museum, the Oakland Museum, American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, College Art Associate's National Conference, and the Society For Photographic Education National Conference. Ginevra was invited to participate in Yale University Art Gallery’s 2017 intensive on photo book publishing, and was selected to be part of the inaugural 2018 Ardesia Projects photography residency in Daverio, Italy. Her work and publications are in the libraries of Yale University Art Gallery Library, The International Center for Photography, Indie Photobook Library, Houston Center for Photography, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
  • Le Bonheur

    Le Bonheur Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) Diptych 24 x 40” Edition of 3
  • Installation view of "Le Bonheur" and "Sweet Broth, A Cure For Those Windows"

    Le Bonheur Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) Diptych 24 x 40” Edition of 3 and Sweet Broth, A Cure For Those Windows Silver Gelatin Prints (Printed by the artist) 80 x 128” (32, 20 x 16” Photographs)
  • Ray Johnson

    Ray Johnson Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 24 x 20” Edition of 3
  • María Tinaut

    María Tinaut Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 19 x 16” Edition of 3
  • Installation view of "Ray Johnson" and "María Tinaut"

    Ray Johnson Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 24 x 20” Edition of 3 and María Tinaut Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 19 x 16” Edition of 3
  • Tarp (Self Portrait)

    Tarp (Self Portrait) Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 24 x 20” Edition of 3
  • Je Tu Il Elle

    Je Tu Il Elle Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 24 x 20” Edition of 3
  • Installation view of "Tarp (Self Portrait)" and "Je Tu Il Elle"

    Tarp (Self Portrait) Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 24 x 20” Edition of 3 and Je Tu Il Elle Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 24 x 20” Edition of 3
  • Rip, Reclining Nude

    Rip, Reclining Nude Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 20 x 16” Edition of 3
  • Red Nude

    Red Nude Chromogenic Photograph (Printed by the artist) 20 x 16” Edition of 3

Sweet Broth, A Cure For Those Windows (Pt 2 of 2)

As Ginvera Shay completes a two month Color Darkroom Residency, Full Circle Gallery is excited to host her first solo exhibition. With a deep framework of conceptual objectives, Shay's chromogenic creations utilize experimentation, humor, and fiction to translate her personal experiences. And rather than strict adherence to conventions in color printing practices, Shay pushes her exposures in the darkroom in search of bold, duotone-like palettes.

Shay’s photography and studio practice are in many ways inextricable from her site-specific curatorial work, which reflect one another through their investment in fostering an openness of exchange and dismantling passive engagement. Photography and sculpture are employed to depict poetic moments of observation and adaptation. A 2018 Maryland Individual Artist Award Recipient, Shay's recent two-person exhibition "A Big Toe Touches A Green Tomato", with Roxana Azar at Resort, was featured online in Artforum and ARTnews. And in September, Phroom released an interview with shay (read it here!) She has lectured and participated in panels at the Queens Museum, the Oakland Museum, American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, College Art Associate's National Conference, and the Society For Photographic Education National Conference. Ginevra was invited to participate in Yale University Art Gallery’s 2017 intensive on photo book publishing, and was selected to be part of the inaugural 2018 Ardesia Projects photography residency in Daverio, Italy. Her work and publications are in the libraries of Yale University Art Gallery Library, The International Center for Photography, Indie Photobook Library, Houston Center for Photography, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

A Big Toe Touches A Green Tomato

A Big Toe Touches A Green Tomato

Roxana Azar and Ginevra Shay
Resort Baltimore

January 20–March 11, 2018

Resort is pleased to present its inaugural exhibition, “A Big Toe Touches A Green Tomato,” featuring the work of Roxana Azar and Ginevra Shay.

These artists use photography, sculpture and ceramics to depict poetic moments of observation and adaptation. Both artists use dystopian backdrops of collapsing dominant structures to point out not just the flaws of these systems, but to highlight alternative, minor modes of persistence.

It is worth noting that Azar and Shay are close friends. The subjects of their work vary greatly, ranging from modernist architecture and speculative science-fiction, to geology and cinematic slapstick. However, when their work is viewed together, the body becomes their shared point of dialogue. In their work, bodies are acknowledged as permeable and vulnerable, while striving to retain autonomy. The body and its environment are forever acting on one another; Azar and Shay re-envision these interactions, folding together bodies, plants, minerals, and space to discover alternative trajectories.

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A meandering stroll from a gesture to a joke, to a plant, and around a building does not diminish the essential complexity of the world. It’s a search for tiny luminous traces; a golden dandelion basking in the burning sun, putting faith in the perseverance of what seems most doomed to perish. You can pursue lightness, without disavowing the importance of the weight of living—invent strategies for cultivation.

In an apocalyptic world slow movement through space is not a refusal of a direct approach—it is counterpoint to catastrophe. A pause to gaze out the window and thank the moon for a very particular shade of dark blue, only to catch a hot and slow moving green. Have you ever seen the same colors as opposites? The meteor was the opposite green of a weeping pine. I would’ve missed it if I wasn’t fixing my broken window.

In utter dissatisfaction with the world one needs to remove the plaque, clear the overgrowth, to make way for light to reach the bottom. When growing, a trellis or a cage for support is best. When fruit forms it can become rather top heavy. Yellow flowers, nightshade. Bloodmeal for nutrition. Give them space and some companions, like marigolds, sage, nasturtium. Companions work together to keep away pests, balance the soil. 94% of its weight is water. Thirsty birds peck at them on hot summer days when they aren’t near a water source. In the garden, we accidentally created a hybrid when propagating seeds for the next season. The fruit was bell shaped, like the first fruit, but the color was a yellowy-orange into dark pink gradient like the second fruit. Unripe fruit may contain a small amount of toxic alkaloids which are more concentrated in the stems and the leaves—these alkaloids are a defense.

Here heaviness dissolves—a big toe touches a green tomato.

*ONLY GINEVRA'S WORK INCLUDED IN BAKER PROFILE

We No Longer See It

We No Longer See It

LVL3 Gallery
Chicago, IL
Jan 9th - Feb 7th, 2016

We No Longer See It: a two-person show featuring new works by Dan Rizzo-Orr and Ginevra Shay. Chicago-based Rizzo-Orr explores structures of art history and the translation of painting through his processes. Baltimore-based Shay focuses on material investigation as a way to map modern cityscapes and aesthetic shifts. "We No Longer See It" brings these two artists together to complement the different approaches of casting an understanding upon images that allow history to unravel.

Raum Bilder

Raum Bilder explores how societies utilizes the proliferation of images in print and media as a means of distraction within a dystopian late-capitalist landscape. I’m interested in the ways re-appropriated images can be used to construct a new visual landscape, one that can critique and challenge the need for distraction through narrative spectacle — though, my dioramas were initially conceived as a means to dissolve the prescribed meaning or use of the photographic image. I’ve been pulling source imagery from advertisements and articles within mass produced publications. Through the dioramas I’ve been able to strip these images of their initial content and focus on their tonal quality, form, and texture — the photograph becoming a paint stroke, or other mark, to build new meaning and purpose within a reimagined landscape.

Brondelidded

Bronzelidded continues my interests in dismantling the photographic medium and the deconstruction of images. Immediately preceding Bronzelidded, I had spent a year making a series titled Lesser Chains, executed in a black and white darkroom without the use of a camera. It was important for me to abandon the camera for a moment and make photographs with the most minimum of means. After exhausting my set parameters for image making, and finishing the series, I decided to start a new body of work where I used bleach to destroy the remaining photographs from Lesser Chains. These manipulated prints became the Bronzelidded series. It was exciting to make photos that were unfixed, imperfect, and ever-changing.

Created for an exhibition at Yale University Art Gallery and now in their collection.

Lesser Chains (pt 1)

Lesser Chains (of Being) stems from my long-standing skepticism regarding photography and its relationship to mass culture. Though I was trained in traditional darkroom methods, and having early on pursued direct, documentary, decisive-moment style image making, I became wary of the ease with which images could be used to manipulate society. I felt a need to rebuild my practice, tossing out anything I deemed inessential. To this end, I temporarily abandoned both the camera and the world external to the darkroom.

Early images from Lesser Chains were as simple and direct of photographic experiences as I could articulate; they are the record of the choreography of my body engaging with the chemistry and space of the darkroom. Slowly, I began to re-incorporate the use of the camera in documenting the world, albeit in a different way. Fragments of architecture began to appear as grounds in some of these prints.

Lesser Chains (pt 2)

Lesser Chains (of Being) stems from my long-standing skepticism regarding photography and its relationship to mass culture. Though I was trained in traditional darkroom methods, and having early on pursued direct, documentary, decisive-moment style image making, I became wary of the ease with which images could be used to manipulate society. I felt a need to rebuild my practice, tossing out anything I deemed inessential. To this end, I temporarily abandoned both the camera and the world external to the darkroom.

Early images from Lesser Chains were as simple and direct of photographic experiences as I could articulate; they are the record of the choreography of my body engaging with the chemistry and space of the darkroom. Slowly, I began to re-incorporate the use of the camera in documenting the world, albeit in a different way. Fragments of architecture began to appear as grounds in some of these prints.

Paintings on Found Photographs for Shay/Bouché

Paintings on Found Photographs for a publication created with artist James Bouché. Two separate artists’ books that were conceptualized and printed together by Ginevra Shay and James Bouché. Each book explores non-traditional photographic processes. Ginevra's zine is a series of 16 paintings on found photographs. James' zine is composed of 16 scans of personal objects with talismanic qualities.

Published March 2013
Edition of 100
Two Zines
32 pages total
Risograph Printed
Saddle Stitch Bound
5.5x8"

Available at Printed Matter in NYC

In the following collections:

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA
Rock Paper Sissors, Oakland, CA
International Center for Photography, New York, NY
Arts & Sciences PROJECTS, New York, NY
Parallel Art Space, in Queens, NY
950 Hart Gallery in Bushwick, NY
Indie Photobook Library, Washington, DC
Houston Center of Photography, Houston, TX
Bethel University Collection of Artist Books & Publications, St. Paul, MN
Little Brown Mushroom Books, St. Paul, MN
Open Space Library, Baltimore, MD
Memorial Library at 17 Cox, Beverly, MA
Salford Zine Library, in Manchester, UK
Work Flow, Brighton, UK

Connect with Ginevra

Ginevra's Curated Collection

This artist has not yet created a curated collection.