Block title

Spiraling Corn Production

Description

Invasive Ecologies (Spiraling Corn Production), 2015 Paper, ink, adhesive 15” x 9” diameter Spiraling Corn Production stemmed from a desire to visualize the rampant upward spiral of both US corn production and population, representing exactly 150 years of data, plotted every two years. Data is vertically extruded, spiraling counterclockwise around an invisible center point. The vertical walls of the spiral represent the United States’ population growth as documented for the years 1866 through 2014, and projected to 2016, marked in increments of 15 million per every vertical row. Population representation begins at approximately 36 million persons and ends at 318 million persons. Population values are indicated in the innermost spiral and on the very outer rim, and fluctuations account for the uneven top, as the growth of both population and agricultural production is visualized on a steady incline. Plotted at the top line upon this graph is the data for Annual Corn, Harvested Acres, in Millions, marked with red spacers and florescent yellow diamonds. Years are indicated on the bottom edge of the spiral. The horizontal length of the spiral is guided by the number of years for which data is gathered, from 1866 to 2014, and projected data to 2016, with the most recent years positioned centrally in the spiral. Eco-visualization artwork is a political act, situated in context of ecopsychology, specifically solastalgia, and the charged climate of rising awareness regarding environmentalism and sustainability. The sculptural series draws on industrial corn production data, offering a response to the devastation of monoculture landscapes, and a vantage point for considering the politics, policy, and ecology of our food production system. Eco-visualization artwork is a political act, situated in context of ecopsychology, specifically solastalgia, and the charged climate of rising awareness regarding environmentalism and sustainability. The sculptural series draws on industrial corn production data, offering a response to the devastation of monoculture landscapes, and a vantage point for considering the politics, policy, and ecology of our food production system.