Block title

“…A BLACK STORY ABOUT NOT JUST SURVIVING BUT THRIVING. IT IS WONDERFULLY WRITTEN, DETAILING THE NUANCES OF HISTORIES AS THEY UNFOLD—BOTH THE VIOLENCE OF SLAVERY AND THE CONSTANT INSIDIOUS INJUSTICES AND MICRO- AND MACRO-AGGRESSIONS OF BEING BLACK (AND BROWN!) AND THIS PARALLEL PLANE OF EXISTENCE OF A PURPORTEDLY AND EARNESTLY POST-RACIAL WORLD…." SHE TRACES HER “GENESIS WITH SHARP, GORGEOUS DETAIL ABOUT THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN PEOPLE'S WORDS AND ACTIONS…." SHE “DEFTLY EXPLICATE[S] [HER] CHILD SELF'S BELONGING ALMOST AS CODE-SWITCHING, MAKING SENSE OF THE LARGER OUTSIDE WORLD AND ITS EVENTS, ITS SENSIBILITY, ON THE ONE HAND, AND [HER] INTERNAL, PRIVATE, BURGEONING SENSE OF SELF, ON THE OTHER HAND…." HER "MEMOIR IS DEEPLY PERSONAL, INTIMATE, AND GENEROUS, THROUGHOUT; IT FELT TO THIS READER NOT SO MUCH LIKE BEING ‘INVITED IN’ AS BEING INSTANTLY TRANSPORTED IN—INTO [HER] SPECIFIC EXPERIENCE OF BEING BLACK IN AMERICA; LIKE [SHE WAS] REMOVING THE WALLS BETWEEN [HERSELF] AND [HER] READER, NO MATTER WHO THEY WERE OR WHAT SKIN THEY WERE IN…." "…THIS IS A BOOK ABOUT BELONGING, SOURCES OF POWER, AND IDENTITY." --Mayumi Shimose Poe, author of Alice on the Island: A Pearl Harbor Survival Story Click here to read more advance praise for Disrupt/ed (a mem-noir)

PDF icon Advance Praise for Disrupt/ed