Block title

Work Samples

The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore (excerpt)

EXCERPT from the film The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore: Featuring the genre-busting talent of James Nasty and TT the Artist, The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore offers a punny and nuanced view of Baltimore neighborhoods in a short film edited from iPhone screenshots of Wi-Fi network names. The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore poses this challenge: Are we connected?

Cylburn Park (excerpt)

EXCERPT from Cylburn Park: Cylburn Park is a text movie in two acts inspired by and edited from a Baltimore neighborhood’s Google Group daily feed and the media’s coverage of it. The texts scroll by at a quick pace as if on a teleprompter screen and include lively exchanges over ducks and racial profiling, offering different perspectives from “bitchy” indeed to high-minded and deeply moving. Cylburn Park is relevant today in Baltimore and beyond as communities struggle to keep it together.

Why

Julia Kim Smith utilizes Google’s search engine's autocomplete feature to find out what people are wondering about her, an Asian woman, and discovers unsettling abstractions, truths, fallacies, desires, and fears about all of us. Why is a compilation of 24 of the search engine results.

Anonymous Rage

With the gap widening between rich and poor, Julia Kim Smith collected nearly 30 signs by the homeless and created a shelter-like installation as a statement of anonymous rage. Anonymous Rage may be viewed in different ways. The signs are real expressions of individual need and desperation. The signs are symbols of a society that cannot take care of its own. The signs are art, as valid as any other form, expressing an anonymous rage that cuts to the core and provokes raw emotions that range from compassion, fear, suspicion, and anger. Through their signs, the homeless rebel against anonymity and invoke our vulnerability and mortality as individuals and as a society.

INSTALLATION
Maryland Art Place, Baltimore, MD, 2006
20th Annual Critics Residency Program, “Mapping The Alternative,” Curator: Lilly Wei, Independent Curator and Critic, Art in America, ARTnews, Art Asia Pacific

  • Anonymous Rage

    Signs by the homeless, frames, plexiglass, Site: Maryland Art Place, Baltimore, MD, 2006, 20th Annual Critics Residency Program, “Mapping the Alternative,” Curator: Lilly Wei, Independent Curator and Critic, Art in America, ARTnews, Art Asia Pacific
  • Anonymous Rage

    Signs by the homeless, frames, plexiglass, Site: Maryland Art Place, Baltimore, MD, 2006, 20th Annual Critics Residency Program, “Mapping the Alternative,” Curator: Lilly Wei, Independent Curator and Critic, Art in America, ARTnews, Art Asia Pacific

Cylburn Park

Community–it’s no walk in the park.

Cylburn Park is a text movie in two acts inspired by and edited from a Baltimore neighborhood’s Google Group daily feed and the media’s coverage of it (below). The texts scroll by at a quick pace as if on a teleprompter screen and include lively exchanges over ducks and racial profiling, offering different perspectives from “bitchy” indeed to high-minded and deeply moving. Cylburn Park is relevant today in Baltimore and beyond as communities struggle to keep it together.

BEST SOMETIMES-RACIST GOOGLE GROUP
“For cringe-worthy entertainment, nothing beats reading the daily feed from the Mount Washington Google Group, the provenance for overly educated people with too much time on their hands and axes to grind. Aside from the mundane stuff–free kids’ toys and recommendations for dentists–the group’s archive of bitchy exchanges over whether to allow ducks to live in the community garden nearly brought some residents to blows. The Group’s Greek chorus really pulls out all the stops when teens from the Pimlico neighborhood are spotted in Mount Washington. Accusations of racial profiling are never funny, but you’ve gotta roll your eyes when Mount Washingtonians call each other ‘moron’ and ‘ass’ as they try to sidestep their own prejudices.”
City Paper’s “Best of Baltimore 2013”

SCREENINGS
2015 Official Selection Brooklyn Film Festival, Brooklyn, NY

DIY Juche

DIY Juche offers Swiftian perspectives on the Great Leader’s ideology of juche (“self-reliance”) and of North Korean political realities.

EXHIBITION HISTORY
A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn, NY, 2013
“A.I.R. National & International Exhibition,” Curator: Jill Conner, Founder, AS | ARTISTS STUDIOS; Independent Critic and Curator; New York Editor, Whitehot Magazine

Washington Project for the Arts, Washington, DC, 2013
“SELECT Auction Gala And Exhibition,” Curator: Lawrence Waung, Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, Washington, DC

PRESS
The Washington Post, Mark Jenkins, “A Glimpse Of What Washington Project For Arts Auction Gala Has In Store,” March 2013

Domesticated Beauty

Domesticated Beauty challenges the line between art and craft and creates quietly subversive domestic objects that reference art history and the contemporary DIY craft movement, including Damien Hirst, Tang Dynasty sculpture, Méret Oppenheim, Janine Antoni, and Martha Stewart.

The works exist both as physical objects and as photographs of the physical objects.

EXHIBITION HISTORY
A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn, NY, 2015
“Transformed Viewpoints,” A.I.R. National & International Exhibition, Curator: Charlotta Kotik, Curator Emerita of Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum

“A.I.R. ReFreshed”
The Center for Gender and Sexuality Studies, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 2015
Washington University, St. Louis, MO, 2015
Governors Island, New York, NY, 2015

Grand Teton

Dedicated to all immigrants and refugees

Grand Teton is a video portrait of a first-generation Korean-American family in transition, as artist Julia Kim Smith films her family assembling once again for a group photo in the same spot where they had stood 35 years earlier in Grand Teton National Park. Through juxtaposition of photography and video, Smith documents the process of assimilation and challenges those racial and cultural boundaries of what it means to be “American.”

“A stunning video portrait of a first-generation Korean-American family. Director Julia Kim Smith films her family assembling for a group photograph in the same spot in Grand Teton National Park where 35 years earlier they stood for the same portrait. That a story can be told in barely five minutes of a static shot of two sisters and their mom, and range in emotion from whimsy to a mother’s tears is remarkable. A director’s love letter to her family.”
Mick Muirfield, Film Programmer, Slamdance Film Festival

SELECTED SCREENINGS
2009 A.I.R. Gallery, “A.I.R. Gallery 8th Biennial,” Brooklyn, NY
Curator: Lilly Wei, Independent Curator and Critic, Art in America, ARTnews, Art Asia Pacific

2009 Official Selection Slamdance Film Festival, Park City, UT
2009 Slamdance On The Road: The Engine Collision Festival, Studio 1636, Hollywood, CA with David Lynch

2009 Official Selection Center for Asian American Media: San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival, San Francisco, Berkeley, San Jose, CA

2009 Official Selection Maryland Film Festival, Opening Night Selection with Bobcat Goldthwait

North Korea In Emoji

A simple, emoji video of what is going down in North Korea for those who find the news coverage too onerous to follow

The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore (Are U Connected?)

Featuring the genre-busting talent of James Nasty and TT the Artist, The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore offers a punny and nuanced view of Baltimore neighborhoods in a short film edited from iPhone screenshots of Wi-Fi network names. The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore poses this challenge: Are we connected?

This project is supported in part by a Rubys Artist Project Grant. The Rubys Artist Project Grants were conceived and initiated with start-up funding from the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation and are a program of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance.

View complete film (password available upon request)

PRODUCTION NOTE
“Baltimore is the world. The world is Baltimore.”
Your Face In Mine, Jess Row

In the wake of the Freddie Gray uprising, I was traveling around Baltimore, lost and looking for a Wi-Fi connection, and was fascinated by the Wi-Fi network names that came up on my phone. I started taking screenshots which I edited into a short film. Thanks to a Rubys Artist Grant, I was able to remaster the film for projection on the big screen and combine forces with James Nasty and TT the Artist to produce an original soundtrack for the film, “Are U Connected?”–both a question and a challenge.
— Julia Kim Smith, Director

SCREENINGS
2017 Official Selection Slamdance Film Festival, Park City, UT
2017 Official Selection Cinequest Film Festival, San Jose, CA
Vimeo Curated Collection: Comedy

PRESS
We Are Moving Stories, Carmela Baranowska, “Slamdance - The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore,” January 2017
Deadline Hollywood, Diana Lodderhose, Dominic Patten, “Slamdance 2017 Unveils Special Screenings, Beyond & Shorts Program,” December 2016
Rubys Media And Performing Arts Grantees 2016, Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance
kottke.org, Jason Kottke, “The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore,” November 2015 (The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore rough cut)
Good Morning Silicon Valley, Levi Sumagaysay, “Off Topic,” November 2015 (The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore rough cut)
Holy Kaw, Guy Kawasaki, “Mapping Baltimore By Wifi Names,” November 2015 (The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore rough cut)
Baltimore Fishbowl, Rachel Monroe, “Lifeline: Wu Tang LAN And Other Great Wifi Network Names In Baltimore,” November 2015 (The Real Wi-Fi Of Baltimore rough cut)

Why

Julia Kim Smith utilizes Google’s search engine's autocomplete feature to find out what people are wondering about her, an Asian woman, and discovers unsettling abstractions, truths, fallacies, desires, and fears about all of us. Why is a compilation of 24 of the search engine results.

SELECTED SCREENINGS
2017 Feminist Art Conference, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada
2016 Gold + Beton, “Exquisit Corpse,” Cologne, Germany
2015 Fuse Art Space, “Exquisite Corpse,” Bradford, UK
Curator: Sarah Faraday
Exhibiting Artists: Anastasia Vepreva, Evelin Stermitz, Faith Holland, Julia Kim Smith, Kate Durbin, Lacie Garnes, Poppy Jackson, Rupi Kaur, Sarah Faraday, Sheena Patel, Sue Williams

2014-2015 Institute for Women and Art, Rutgers University, “MTV: Momentum Technology Video” and “Momentum: Women/Art/Technology,” New Brunswick, NJ

2014 Official Selection Center For Asian American Media CAAMFest, San Francisco, Berkeley, Oakland, CA
2013 DUMBO Arts Festival, Brooklyn, NY

2013 Washington Project for the Arts, Pepco Edison Place Gallery, “Experimental Media 2013: Cyber In Securities,” Washington, DC
Curator: Lisa Moren, Professor of Visual Art, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Exhibiting Artists: Birgit Bachler, Walter Langelaar, Owen Mundy, and Tim Schwartz; Channel TWo (CH2): Adam Trowbridge and Jessica Westbrook, with Jesus Duran; Heather Dewey-Hagborg; Hasan Elahi; The Force of Freedom with Dave Young; Taylor Hokanson; Ricarda McDonald and Donna Szoke; Lexie Mountain; Preemptive Media: Beatriz de Costa, Jamie Schulte and Brooke Singer; David Rokeby; Julia Kim Smith; WhiteFeather

2013 Baltimore Artscape, “Slippage,” Center for the Arts Gallery, Towson University, Towson, MD
Curator: Daniel Belasco, Curator, Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, State University of New York

PRESS
Feminist Art Conference, Valérie Frappier, “Meet The Artists FAC 2017: Julia Kim Smith,” December 2016
Paper Magazine, Layne Weiss, “Exquisite Corpse: Inside Germany’s Powerful Feminist Exhibit,” February 2016
Dazed Digital, UK, Sooanne Berner, “After Cologne Sexual Attacks, Art Show Champions Women,” January 2016
artnet News, Sarah Hyde, “Cologne Art Show Celebrates Women In The Wake Of Attacks,” January 2016
this is tomorrow, UK, Alice Miller, “Exquisite Corpse,” September 2015
Corridor8, UK, Elspeth Mitchell, “Review: Exquisite Corpse, Fuse Art Space,” August 2015
The Washington Post, Mark Jenkins, “Fall Critics’ Picks: Gallery Exhibits,” September 2013
Washington Project for the Arts, Lisa Moren, “Experimental Media 2013: Cyber In Securities,” September 2013
Angry Asian Man, Phil Yu, “Julia Kim Smith Asks Google Why,” March 2013

  • Why

    Film, running time: 00:02:44
  • Why

    Still from film
  • Washington Project for the Arts Experimental Media 2013: Cyber In Securities

    “This knowledge engine was at play when the artist Julia Kim Smith took to Google in 2013 [2012] in order to produce the 1 min. video loop titled Why?. Before Kim Smith finished typing her question “why do asian women...?” the knowledge engine kicked-in, anticipating her possible thoughts: “like black men”, “age well”, “wear masks” and so on. These results are all the more disturbing because there is no human intervention in the algorithm at Google that generates these results, as there is when they censor pornographic and violent words. According to algorithms, a common denominator of people (a type of shared consciousness) are privately asking Google these questions about Asian women more than they are asking anything else. Google reads the action of both individuals and collective social and geographic groups in order to anticipate user’s intentions when they type. When such algorithms are applied to a group of people, especially a minority, the presumed objectivity inherent in the search sanctifies the anticipated result as simply true. We’re left with the question: does the action of the masses constitute truth?” Lisa Moren, Curator, Washington Project for the Arts, Experimental Media 2013: “Cyber In Securities”
    PDF icon Washington Project for the Arts Experimental Media 2013: Cyber In Securities

With Banksy

Street artist Banksy pulls off no small feat by being both the anonymous artist and the famous artist at the same time. But by being anonymous, he is like Virginia Woolf’s anonymous woman—“Anonymous was a woman.”—and anyone can appropriate his identity. Which is exactly what Julia Kim Smith does in her photo project With Banksy. She heeds Banksy’s edict (and Picasso’s: “The Bad Artists Imitate, The Great Artists Steal”), appropriates his hooded identity, and places him and his work in her own scenarios. In a series of photographs that challenge gender and celebrity roles, “Banksy” lounges front and center while Smith performs daily chores. But Smith is more than just the accommodating hostess, with “Banksy” she creates new social memes and street art for the internet.

EXHIBITION HISTORY
Kochi-Muziris Biennale, Kochi, India 2016-2017
“Cooperative Consciousness: A.I.R. Artists At Kochi,” Curators: Kathryn Myers, Jayanthi Moorthy

A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn, NY, 2014
“Liminal Communities,” A.I.R. National & International Exhibition, Curator: Lucy Li, Independent Curator and Critic, New York, NY

Platoon Kunsthalle, Seoul, South Korea, 2011
“At Platoon With Banksy”

PRESS
Korean American Story, Grace Jahng Lee, “Portrait Of Artist Julia Kim Smith,” May 2014
Urbanite, Cara Ober, “Great Artists Steal,” November 2011
Oasis Magazine, Saudi Arabia, “At Home With Banksy,” Autumn 2011
Baltimore Magazine, John Lewis, “Life Changing Art: With Banksy in Korea,” September 2011
Shortlist, UK, “Banksy In The House,” July 2011
Juxtapoz, “Julia Kim Smith: At Home With Banksy Series,” July 2011
GQ, The GQ Eye, “Banksy, Beefrolls And LSD,” July 2011
Animal, Marina Galperina, “Banksy Is Her Homebody,” July 2011
Hypebeast, Douglas Brundage, “At Home With Banksy By Julia Kim Smith,” July 2011
Kidrobot KRonikle, “A Day In The Life Of Banksy,” July 2011
Baltimore Fishbowl, Betsy Boyd, “Provocative New Resident Artist Julia Kim Smith,” June 2011
Angry Asian Man, Phil Yu, “Julia Kim Smith Is Hanging With Banksy,” June 2011
Happy Famous Artists, “Julia Kim Smith With Banksy,” June 2011

Baltimore, Actually, I like it.

Think locally, act locally.

T-shirt and bumper sticker made in Baltimore: created and designed by Julia Kim Smith, printed by Stem Graphics Printshop, and available at Atomic Books. Every T-shirt and bumper sticker makes an impact: The artist donates 100% of profits to The Creative Alliance.

PRESS
“A trending unofficial civic slogan declares ‘Baltimore: Actually, I Like It,’ which best captures the mix of resignation and defensiveness that comes from residing in a place long synonymous with what’s wrong with American cities. This may never be a Portlandia-style urban playground, but the raggedy pleasures of Baltimore living are real and durable, and can be found no where else. That’s why we’re here, and why we stay, even though sometimes we all feel like tearing the place down.”
Grist, David Dudley, “Why Baltimore is fighting for its life, again,” April 2015

Share:

About Julia

Baltimore City

Julia Kim Smith is an inter- and multidisciplinary artist whose work explores issues of identity and the social and political landscape by any means necessary. Her projects take the form of new media, video, film, photography, printmaking, and craft. Smith’s debut solo show at The Creative Alliance, a... more

Socialize with #bakerArtists