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Singularities

In my work, I use materials from daily life, objects that have cultural associations and points of reference for viewers. I explore the tension between the cerebral concerns of minimalism and an investigation of humanity: emotional, spiritual, symbolic, and narrative. At its core, the work is a meditation on entropy, time, loss, decay, renewal, and survival.

My background in painting informs my interest in the materiality of paint and how its physical properties can be explored beyond two dimensions. The artwork changes with time; it is a mirror that invites viewers to consider their own mortality. Materials off-gas, break down and decay, just as our own bodies do. Most recently, my study of 17th-century Dutch still life painting has resulted in bodies of work called Vanitas, Trompe l'Oeil, and Singularities.

Trompe l'Oeil

In my work, I use materials from daily life, objects that have cultural associations and points of reference for viewers. I explore the tension between the cerebral concerns of minimalism and an investigation of humanity: emotional, spiritual, symbolic, and narrative. At its core, the work is a meditation on entropy, time, loss, decay, renewal, and survival.

My background in painting informs my interest in the materiality of paint and how its physical properties can be explored beyond two dimensions. The artwork changes with time; it is a mirror that invites viewers to consider their own mortality. Materials off-gas, break down and decay, just as our own bodies do. Most recently, my study of 17th-century Dutch still life painting has resulted in bodies of work called Vanitas, Trompe l'Oeil, and Singularities.

Vanitas

In my work, I use materials from daily life, objects that have cultural associations and points of reference for viewers. I explore the tension between the cerebral concerns of minimalism and an investigation of humanity: emotional, spiritual, symbolic, and narrative. At its core, the work is a meditation on entropy, time, loss, decay, renewal, and survival.

My background in painting informs my interest in the materiality of paint and how its physical properties can be explored beyond two dimensions. The artwork changes with time; it is a mirror that invites viewers to consider their own mortality. Materials off-gas, break down and decay, just as our own bodies do. My newest body of work, Vanitas, explores these themes in dialogue with 17th-century Dutch still life painting.

Paint As Object

Installation views and some individual works from solo exhibition at Hillyer Art Space, Washington, DC.

Statement:
In my most recent body of work I use materials from daily life, objects that have cultural associations and points of reference for viewers. I explore the tension between the cerebral concerns of minimalism and an investigation of humanity: emotional, spiritual, symbolic, and narrative. At its core, the work is a meditation on entropy, time, loss, decay, renewal, and survival.

My background in painting informs my interest in the materiality of paint and how its physical properties can be explored beyond two dimensions. The artwork changes with time; it is a mirror that invites viewers to consider their own mortality. Materials off-gas, break down and decay, just as our own bodies do. I ask the viewer to feel raw and vulnerable and to delve into their own emotional landscapes.

Monopoles

In my most recent body of work I use materials from daily life, objects that have cultural associations and points of reference for viewers. I explore the tension between the cerebral concerns of minimalism and an investigation of humanity: emotional, spiritual, symbolic, and narrative. At its core, the work is a meditation on entropy, time, loss, decay, renewal, and survival.

My background in painting informs my interest in the materiality of paint and how its physical properties can be explored beyond two dimensions. The artwork changes with time; it is a mirror that invites viewers to consider their own mortality. Materials off-gas, break down and decay, just as our own bodies do. I ask the viewer to feel raw and vulnerable and to delve into their own emotional landscapes.

Ladders

In my most recent body of work I use materials from daily life, objects that have cultural associations and points of reference for viewers. I explore the tension between the cerebral concerns of minimalism and an investigation of humanity: emotional, spiritual, symbolic, and narrative. At its core, the work is a meditation on entropy, time, loss, decay, renewal, and survival.

My background in painting informs my interest in the materiality of paint and how its physical properties can be explored beyond two dimensions. The artwork changes with time; it is a mirror that invites viewers to consider their own mortality. Materials off-gas, break down and decay, just as our own bodies do. I ask the viewer to feel raw and vulnerable and to delve into their own emotional landscapes.

  • Ladder

    2004 mixed media and paint on wood 96" x 36" x variable distance from wall
  • Sheena

    2006 mixed media and paint on wood 96" x 48" x variable distance from wall
  • Dean

    2009 mixed media and paint on wood 144" x 48" x variable distance from wall
  • Little Hank

    2011 mixed media on wood with paint 72" x 18" x variable distance from wall
  • Hank

    2011 mixed media on wood with paint 96" x 36" x variable distance from wall
  • Auxilio

    2011 mixed media on wood with paint 96" x 48" x variable distance from wall
  • Kat

    2013 mixed media on wood 72" x 24" x variable
  • Erin

    2013 mixed media on wood 96" x 36" x variable

Panels

Through my creative process, I examine both physical forms and metaphysical concerns. In terms of spatial relationships, my work explores balance, materials, and a sense of presence. Intellectually, I consider the gray area between painting and sculpture, the territory between picture-plane and object, the relationship between viewer and object, the relationship of the object to the exhibition space, and the relationship between floor/wall/viewer. In my most recent body of work, I am using materials from daily life, objects that have cultural associations and narrative points of reference for viewers. My work is a meditation on entropy, blackness, time, loss, decay, renewal, and survival.

  • Amina

    2002 oil enamel and latex paint on wood panel 96" x 24" x 6"
  • Lorna

    2002 oil enamel and latex paint on wood panel 96" x 24" x 6"
  • Fela

    2002 oil enamel and latex paint on wood panel 96" x 24" x 6"
  • Franklin

    2010 mixed media, latex paint on wood panel 96" x 24" x 6"
  • Mary Helena

    2010 mixed media, latex paint on wood panel 96" x 24" x 6"
  • Maxwell

    2010 mixed media, latex paint on wood panel 96" x 24" x 6"
  • Cesarea

    2011 mixed media, latex paint on wood panel 96" x 24" x 6"

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About Annie

Baltimore City

Annie Farrar was born in Wheeling, West Virginia and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Nashville, Tennessee. She earned her BFA in Painting from the Maryland Institute College of Art and her MA in Museum Studies from George Washington University. Annie is a Baltimore artist whose process-... more

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